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BillB48

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About BillB48

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  • Location
    Florida
  • Interests
    Cruising!
  • Favorite Cruise Line(s)
    Royal Caribbean
  • Favorite Cruise Destination Or Port of Call
    Panama Canal, TAs, Alaska

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  1. The only reason of cancellation at this point I can think of off hand would be insufficient interest in the excursion. Just a guess. Other suggestions... perhaps the excursion that takes you to Miraflores Locks and the IMAX theater. There is also the excursion The Shaping of Panama that may suit your needs. There is a brief walking portion to that excursion, but anyone who did not want to walk thru that section of the Casco Antiguo could just remain on the bus.
  2. Heading through the Suez would make a lot of sense particularly if they were going to pick up a crew along the way. Something that surprised me, there are only two or three days difference in sailing time to reach California by going through the Straits of Magellan as opposed to going through the Suez. The South American option is the slightly longer route, but 3 extra days might be cheaper than the tolls at Suez.
  3. To regularly call at a California port a ship must be able to connect to shore power while she is in port to comply with California's Air Resource Board emission requirements. The Navigator may have been the most convenient ship to equip with the ability to connect to shore power while in port.
  4. You are so right about the overhang on the Voyager/Freedom class ships, that perhaps is more of a showstopper for a transit than being a little too tall for the Bridge of Americas. On my last trip on the Liberty I took a measured length of cord with a weight so that I could measure the distance to the water. I came up with a height of a little over 50'. I measured it while we were in port, but I am not so sure on how just how accurate I was since there was really a strong wind blowing which bowed the cord at an angle which significantly which introduced a great deal error in my "guesstimate
  5. This tour will involve a bus ride to Gamboa to meet the boat. Once on the boat you will be in Gatun Lake and the ride to where you will encounter the monkeys will in part be in the main shipping channel of the Canal. The monkeys you will most likely encounter will be capuchin monkeys and they will be glad to see you since they are looking for a drive-by handout. Never know what else you may come across. The scenery on the way to Gamboa will be dependent on from which port your ship calls at. That would be Ft. Amador for Panama City on the Pacific and Colon for the Atlantic side
  6. The partial transit cruise is a great cruise and you can get a good feel for the Canal if you include the shore excursion that takes you on a partial transit that goes through the Pacific Locks and Gaillard Cut. However, a full transit cruise is truly the best way to experience the Canal. If you decide on a partial transit cruise with Carnival, ensure that the ship will offer shore excursions once the ship reaches Gatun Lake. Most cruise lines do offer shore excursions upon reaching Gatun Lake, however in the past I am aware of some Carnival partial transit cruises that have not offered th
  7. That's what it seems to me as well even though NCL's description of Panama Canal/Gatun Lake portion of the cruise indicates that there will be shore excursions once the ship reaches Gatun Lake. Since they have not indicated that the ship would stop in Colon after the partial transit, I think it would be impractical for the ship to wait at anchor in Gatun Lake while passengers are on shore excursions. Perhaps they will offer some excursions either pre or post cruise?
  8. Never did a Canal cruise over the holidays so I can't speak directly to that time frame. In the earlier fall and spring when we have done our Canal cruises, the demographics of a Canal cruise does skew a little older, but I have found that most age groups are fairly well represented. Having said that, probably older teens and young adults (early20s) will not be all that well represented. But each cruise is unique, you never know. If you select one of the Princess cruises using the new locks, that would certainly improve the odds of finding others in a similar age group. Ships t
  9. That would be perhaps not the fastest transcontinental railroad, but without a doubt the quickest transcontinental RR. Completed in 1855 the Panama Railroad can get you across the continent in a little over an hour. While the RR does skirt the edge of the Canal and glimpses of the Canal can be seen from the train, there is only two short areas where the railroad is actually running along the Canal where ship traffic can be easily seen. It is a pleasant ride and a large part mostly natural scenery, but you really don't see a great deal of the Canal proper.
  10. There was a voluntary program last year to keep the speed of ships to help protect whales off most of the California coast to 12 knots or less from the middle of May to the middle of November. I think they are doing it again this year which may account for her slower speed.
  11. A little earlier today at Pedro Miguel...
  12. Things you find when you read something after it is cold!! Remaining 😂
  13. I don't believe the Coral Princess has the balcony restriction as the Island Princess since the CP has not undergone the same modifications as the IP. Perhaps the CP may have Canal transits planned. The CP is the only other ship in the Princess fleet that can use the original locks. For a first or a bucket list cruise I would recommend using the original locks. While not knowing how convenient it will be for your parents to be out where they can be on the open decks in order to take in the sights of the transit, as EM pointed out they would miss a lot by being limited to the bal
  14. Now that clears up a few things. Disregard references to Gatun Locks, Agua Clara Locks it will be!
  15. It certainly can cost less without a reservation, $35,000 to be exact. There are other costs that could be avoided as well, no need to pay $30,000 for a daylight transit guarantee and the toll per passenger berth drops from $138 to $111 per berth so long as there are no passengers on board. Now it is possible that they might be using a transit reservation that was already made and paid for as they were unable to use it because of the changes brought about by Covid. They might be swapping transit dates, if that is they case they may have to go with what has already been payed for
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