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njhorseman

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  1. If Binder were going to take over for FDR why would his role in during the three month contract extension be strictly to provide transition support? The wording makes it pretty clear he's not going to be NCLH's CEO. It looks like he's leaving the company...to retire or perhaps do something else. "2. Transition period Beginning on January 1, 2022 and through March 31, 2022 (the “Transition Period”), your services shall be limited to providing transition support during normal business hours to the Company as may be reasonably requested by either the Board of Directors or Chief Executive Officer of Norwegian Cruise Line Holdings Ltd. (“NCLH”) or the new President and Chief Executive Officer of Oceania Cruises from time to time. During the Transition Period, you will continue to receive your base salary and benefits provided under your Employment Agreement, however, you will not be entitled to a Pro-rata Bonus under Section 5.3(b)(iii) of your Employment Agreement for the Transition Period."
  2. The Del Rio quote says ""My family and I, my grandchildren, my children, my wife, we will be on our first cruise,"...there is no "(NCL's)" in the quote. He is speaking for NCLH, not just NCL, and the first cruise could be on Oceania or Regent Seven Seas rather than NCL. Further the plans I've seen in the past had about six ships in total from the NCLH group sailing at the restart, and some could be from Oceania or Regent Seven Seas.
  3. By the way, the reason for the stock grant is explained in this 8-K filing: http://www.nclhltdinvestor.com/static-files/ed3ea1ff-8175-41af-b5f6-4ba75fd54aa5 Binder's employment contract has been extended through and terminates on December 31, 2021. He will then remain employed for three months in a transition role. The 115,000 restricted shares that vest on March 31, 2022 are in granted consideration for his work during the three month extension.
  4. They have lots and lots of stock available to compensate executives. From the latest NCLH 10 Q : "Ordinary shares, $0.001 par value; 490,000,000 shares authorized; 280,798,331 shares issued and 256,347,472 shares outstanding at June 30, 2020." With over 200 million authorized shares that have not been issued and 24 million shares issued but not outstanding granting 115,100 shares to Binder under the performance incentive plan is not giving away anything the company needs. Executive incentive compensation one of they are holding the issued but not outstanding shares. And the shares don't vest until March 21, 2022...18 months from now. By the time that 18 months has elapsed they'll either be worthless because the company has been restructured or dissolved in bankruptcy, or the company will have survived the crisis and returned to profitability. Also, see my next post for a further explanation of what's behind this.
  5. Our experience with the dining room on Oceania has been similar to yours and we ended up doing the same...eating in the Terrace Cafe except for nights when we had specialty restaurant reservations.
  6. What price increase in NCLH stock are you talking about? The stock closed today at $15.17. A month ago on August 24, it closed at $16.74. Two months earlier, on July 23 it closed at $14.41. Three months ago, on June 23 it closed at $18.03 . Yes, it's higher today than at the start of the pandemic when the cruise industry shut down and the stock market as a whole tanked , but the entire market has rebounded sharply since then . All you're seeing on NCLH stock in the last couple of months are the typical day-to-day fluctuations based on whether there's good news or bad news. No they're not buying back stock right now. They don't have the cash to do it. They bought back stock when the company was making money hand over fist, just like many companies do. It boosts the stock price, enriching the institutions and senior executives who have big stakes in the company.
  7. There are no taxes assessed in Bermuda. BTW...you're not in Bermuda 5 days. There's one day when the ship moves between St. George and Hamilton and on the schedule because the port is changing it looks like two days, but if you look closely it's really one. In terms of 24 hour periods you're actually in Bermuda for a bit more than 3 days spread out over four calendar days because you arrive in Bermuda at noon Sunday and depart Bermuda at 2 pm Wednesday.
  8. I know..but the none of the ships that have been cited here as possible subjects of the ad are currently docked in the US. Probably when the brochure was originally produced the ship in questions was located in the US, but that information was never changed when the ship moved. What was updated is the cover page in August, which lists the ship as being located in Glasgow.
  9. Saying that you may have to cancel if you're required to pay additional amounts for required shore excursions ignores the fact that you're also paying for the so-called "included" shore excursions and alcoholic beverages on all-inclusive lines like Viking Ocean. Your cruise fare is substantially higher on Viking than it would be without those items being included. That's why I prefer the ala carte model...it's anything but "nickel and dime", which is about the most ignorant term about cruising in existence. I only have to pay for what I want...not for the things that I don't want. I drink very little alcohol...at most a glass of wine with dinner or the occasional beer. Why should I pay for the people that are heavy alcohol consumers? And why should I pay for excursions in every port when I may not want to take them? I'll pay for just the excursions I want to take, thank you.
  10. All a COVID-19 test proves is your positive or negative status at the time the test is taken. It's just a snapshot of that moment in time. If you take a test today and it's negative but you're exposed to and acquire COVID-19 a few hours later a test taken a few days later will come up positive. So yes, for a highly communicable disease like COVID-19 when you're going to enter an environment like a cruise ship where there's great potential to either acquire or spread the disease you absolutely need repetitive testing in order to identify the infected as quickly as possible and isolate them from others. Plus...for COVID-19 it's generally accepted by epidemiologists that asymptomatic carriers can spreD the infection to others...so yes you retest someone who tests positive without symptoms.
  11. So-called social media influencers are the last people I would believe about anything. They're doing it for the purpose of self aggrandizement and are about as trustworthy as politicians...maybe less so.
  12. You're misinterpreting what the article says. The exact statement is "The MSC Grandiosa has been limited to 70% of its capacity", which means the maximum number of passengers that will be allowed is capped at 70% of capacity. It does not say how many passengers have actually been on board. Could a sailing or sailings have been at 70%? Sure...but the the article I previously cited says, at least for that sailing, they were at about 1/3 capacity, and we have no information on any of their other sailings, so you can't say they've been sailing at 70%. Think of it this way... if a baseball stadium has a capacity 50,00 people it doesn't mean there are 50,000 people at every game.
  13. Penthouse suites do not receive the six bottles of alcohol. That's only for suites above the penthouse category. Every stateroom from the least expensive inside cabin to the most expensive suite gets the complimentary soft drinks.
  14. The poster believes they are sailing at 30 to 40% of capacity, not 70%, and if this article about an MSC August 31 cruise is indicative of MSC's percentage of capacity, the poster is correct: https://www.cruisecritic.com/news/5572/ "There are about 2,000 passengers on board, on a ship that can accommodate more than 6,000. The distancing is, in fact, ensured."
  15. I believe the poster is saying they're losing money at the 30 to 40% of capacity they're currently sailing with.
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