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SargassoPirate

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About SargassoPirate

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    Cool Cruiser

About Me

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    The Sargasso Sea
  • Interests
    Raiding and Plundering

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  1. Just curious, are the tables in the Horizon Court pre set with drinkware during breakfast hours? I've seen it and complained about it on every Princess cruise we've done. We have seen the unused, inverted or right-side-up drinkware left on the table between passengers, the tables "cleaned" with a swipe of used cloth napkin and the the unused drinkware re-positioned for the next user. Who's to say if the previous diners handled, sneezed on, or coughed on that drinkware? Maybe they coughed into that napkin that the crew used to wipe down the table. When I complain, I'm always told that it's corporate policy that the tables be pre-set at breakfast. I always grab my own clean drinkware from one of the beverage stations and I never, ever unroll my silverware burrito and lay my eating utensils on the table.
  2. Think about all viruses when you go to the Horizon Court for breakfast and find the drinkware already on the table, upside down. Then watch to see if they leave "unused" drinkware on the table for the next passenger and watch to see how they sanitize the table with that drinkware still sitting there. My advice - grab your own coffee and juice from the beverage station and don't use anything that you find already on the table.
  3. Try Travel Guard for an annual policy. It covers you for all travel beyond, I think, 150 miles from home. It does have limits and will not cover you for full cancellation of a cruise, for example. As long as you understand that it is not without limits and for losses beyond those limits you are self-insured, it may work for you. I figure that what I have saved by not buying cruise and air line's insurance over the years has been well worth it.
  4. I love it. I am an Appalachian hillbilly descended from Scottish immigrants who left the lowlands during the great leaving. Our national dress is a set of bib overalls and a plaid shirt. To dress up for Sunday-go-to-meetin' we add a fedora. No use puttin' on airs. We do get a little more dressed up for marryins and buryins since those are more formal affairs. I guess I need to pack my funeral suit for cruising.😄😄😄
  5. I, for one, speak up to the offended when I see a passenger ignore the serving tongs or ladles and use their hands at the buffet. I hope it embarrasses them enough to change their behavior. I also notify a supervisor. On a recent cruise I saw an ignorant passenger handle several rolls with her hand until she found the right one. The tongs were right there, but she apparently didn't know what they were for. I said "Please don't handle other people's food with your hands." She huffed and puffed and walked away mumbling about me being rude. I also speak to the supervisors when I see tables pre-set with drink ware - especially if unused drink ware is left on the table for the next person to use. The next time you are on a cruise, any cruise, watch to see how the buffet tables are cleaned between uses. I often see the tables given a swipe with a used cloth napkin and then drink ware placed upside down on the table surface or the multi-use placemat. And then they wonder how viruses spread.
  6. If it moves and it's not supposed to - Duct Tape. If it's supposed to move and doesn't, WD40. My little tool kits comes in handy on just about every cruise. Sewing kit with a couple of buttons, small leatherman tool, small Swiss Army knife with scissors and a cork screw, small vial of Gorilla Glue, duct tape, WD40 pen, eyeglass repair kit, Sharpie pen, and a few other bits and bobs.
  7. I like it, but I'm sure some of the fashion police will object. The dress code that I see on the P&O website does not mention the style of the shirt or the tie in the narrative, in fact it doesn't mention shirt at all, but does show some illustrations posted previously. "Our Gala Evenings, or Black Tie nights, offer a chance to get dressed to the nines in glamorous evening wear. Don your favourite cocktail dress, tuxedo, ball gown or dinner jacket, or alternatively a dark business suit and tie. You may also wear formal national dress or military uniform". BTW, does the Maitre D check to see if one is wearing socks with the required red toes and heels?
  8. We are aware of basic sanitation practices and are always on guard for poor sanitation practices by others when traveling. The basics: Wash your hands, wash your hands, wash your hands. Resanitize after you go through the buffet line and touch ladle handles, the bottom of your chair when you pull it in, and any condiment containers. DO NOT lay your silverware directly on the table - the table may have been sneezed on and then wiped down with a used cloth napkin (seen it done). Be suspicious of any food worker wearing plastic gloves - they work well to keep the person's hands clean and are even more effective in spreading germs from one surface to another. Sit for a bit and observe all of the surfaces a person wearing those gloves touches as well as your food. Essentially, break the chain between the dirty world out there and what you put in your mouth.
  9. Good point about a shirt and tie not being that heavy. I'll pack one or two when I cruise on P&O. A pompous ass in a tux is still a pompous ass is a roundabout counter to the old saw that clothes make the man. As I have cruised over the years, I have met a variety of people and some of the most charming have been amongst those who may not be dressed to the nines and some of the most boorish have been those who show up in a tux and are definitely dressed to impress. I know it's a broad generalization, but the extremes are memorable. Dress codes, chair hogs, and smoking are all hot topics aren't they? Cheers.
  10. No plans to change any travel plans here, but we are aware of basic sanitation practices and are always on guard for poor sanitation practices by others when traveling. The basics: Wash your hands, wash your hands, wash your hands. Resanitize after you go through the buffet line and touch ladle handles, the bottom of your chair when you pull it in, and any condiment containers. DO NOT lay your silverware directly on the table - the table may have been sneezed on and then wiped down with a used cloth napkin (seen it done). Be suspicious of any food worker wearing plastic gloves - they work well to keep the person's hands clean and are even more effective in spreading germs from one surface to another. Sit for a bit and observe all of the surfaces a person wearing those gloves touches as well as your food. Essentially, break the chain between the dirty world out there and what you put in your mouth.
  11. I can see and understand your position. Thanks for sharing. I prefer to travel light and pack what is necessary, but with enough that I can dress for dinner on a ship without offending anyone's sensibilities. A smile and some polite conversation go a long way. If my lack of a tie is offensive, I don't think I'm the one with the problem. A pompous ass dressed in a tuxedo is still a pompous ass. As the character Jack Dawson said in the movie Titanic "Just the other night I was sleeping under a bridge and now here I am on the grandest ship in the world having champagne with you fine people. I figure life's a gift and I don't intend on wasting it." Cheers.
  12. The clothes police do seem to be a bit more militant and opinionated on Cunard and P&O. I try to fit in as easily as possible when considering what to pack for a trip that includes a month or two on land before or after a cruise. To that end, my standard black ensemble has been allowed into the MDR on formal/gala nights on several lines - including Cunard. And I always check with the maitre d first. While it may be an affront to the "tea in first" crowd, a smile and polite behavior will carry the evening. As the character Jack Dawson said in the movie Titanic "Just the other night I was sleeping under a bridge and now here I am on the grandest ship in the world having champagne with you fine people. I figure life's a gift and I don't intend on wasting it."
  13. And it looks like the example photos posted meet the requirements for gala nights. I may have to upgrade my black T-shirt under a black jacket ensemble with a cravat
  14. Call it smart attire, and indeed it looks to me like the example photos meet the requirement for any evening except gala nights. Thanks for clarifying.
  15. And here are the two examples of what Cunard considers Gala dress for men.
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