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SargassoPirate

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Posts posted by SargassoPirate


  1. 37 minutes ago, rbslos18 said:

    +1!
    This was exactly our journey to VO ten days ago when we booked our first cruise.  It has become harder and harder to find DW’s required wrap-around promenade deck. 
    Happy Thanksgiving

    And Happy Thanksgiving to you.

     

    The wrap around promenade is to the point of being a deal breaker.  Besides walking around it in the mornings, I love sitting on a comfy deck chair with a good book and whiling away the afternoon watching the sea go by.


  2. After trying a couple of the giant floating amusement parks, She Who Must Be Obeyed and I found VO when invited along on a cruise with some friends. We loved their ships that feel like ships, no feral children running loose, and the relaxed atmosphere without being nickel and dimed at every turn.

     

    While we don't cruise exclusively with any one line, we have gravitated to lines that offer a more traditional cruising experience, among those are VO, HAL, Cunard, and the smaller ships of Celebrity and Royal.  When the promenades that go all the way around the ship disappear, so do we.


  3. She Who Must Be Obeyed doesn't drink so a beverage package would never work for me.  What I do is order a bottle or two or three of scotch (depending on how long the cruise is ) to be delivered to our cabin on embarkation day.  The liter sized bottles are more pricey than on land, but a heck of a lot cheaper than by the drink.

     

    It's supposed to be consumed in your cabin only, but I'll occasionally take a wee dram with me while out and about in the evening for a turn around the promenade.


  4. I agree with the first time HAL cruiser's observations since they echo our impressions on our first HAL cruise years ago. We booked it quite by accident when looking for a transatlantic that would get us to Europe at a particular time.  We loved it, and always consider HAL when looking to book cruises.


  5. 38 minutes ago, bemis12 said:

     

    He has quit sailing Princess dozens of times and wants to make sure you know it.

     😄 Only once by my count.  Since they pulled the barrel chairs we have booked four cruises on other lines.  One of those is a world cruise.  There were four cruise lines under consideration for the world cruise.  Princess narrowed it to three.  Thanks to CC we found out about the chair situation before booking further cruises with Princess.👌

     

    There are lots of cruise lines and lots of ships on the seas.  


  6. On 11/3/2019 at 9:50 AM, Peregrina651 said:

     

    Fetch it out! 

     

    Most of the time Viking will negotiate on the pay in full date, usually to 12 month in advance of sailing.

     

    However, if you already have a feature cruise booked, as you say you do, the pay in full will be 6 months in advance.

     

    Moreover, if you book while you are on board, you will be offered  6 months in advance along with some other booking benefits that you can't elsewhere -- and if you are working with a TA, and you so wish, your TA will go on the booking (so no hassle having to transfer the booking to your TA at a later date).

     

    I did fetch it out and let it lay for a few days. Finally, I picked up the phone and called our "usual" agent at Viking.  After expressing my interest in a particular cruise at the November sale price as well as my displeasure of the fine print requiring payment by the end of December in order to get the sale price, he went to work.  Long story short, we were able to get a three category upgrade, a reduced deposit, and final payment closer to the actual sale date.  It probably helped that we've sailed with Viking before and used the same Viking agent, but after all was said and done I was happy with the overall arrangements.

     

    We don't sail exclusively with any one cruise line, always looking for a good deal on somewhere we want to go.  Fortunately, in today's cruise industry, there are lots of choices.


  7. 2 hours ago, cruisekap said:

    I did a quick google search and found an article about NCL banning door decorations and citing them as a fire hazard.  I work in a hospital setting and know that we have been cited for a fire hazard by the Fire Marshall by having combustible materials (paper) in hallways and doors that are deems a hazard. (they were simply temporary signs/flyers for temporary way finding etc. )  Always seemed strange to me because there are many magazines etc around that are also combustible too.  Maybe they were cited in some sort of safety inspection too.

    Probably some over zealous fire inspector.  If your building is fully sprinklered and equipped with sufficient exits, I would ask to see what section of the NFPA or local fire code they are citing. 

     

    My only copy around here is over 20 years old, so I wouldn't trust it in a code argument.


  8. On 11/22/2019 at 9:12 AM, Iamcruzin said:

    They couldn't come up with a valid reason so they defaulted to safety.  Nobody can argue with that.

     I can.

     

    Door decorations do little to add the the fuel load in the corridor, especially when the occupancy, in this forum the ship, is fully sprinklered and equipped with automatic fire doors.

     

    A bigger hazard is mobility devices parked in the corridor, thereby blocking free and open access to the path of exit travel.  If only the cruise line would put a notice about that in their daily papers.


  9. While handwashing is indeed the best defense, how many common contact surfaces do you touch after you wash your hands and before you pop that roll into your mouth?

     

    Food ladles, beverage dispenser handles, the menu, the bottom of your chair as you pulled it in, the salt/pepper shakers, the table top itself? Was the table preset with drinking glasses/cups placed upside down on the table surface?  If so, take a few moments to see how the tables have been cleaned in between diners.  I've sat and watched the crew take a used cloth napkin and wipe the table with it and then reset the table with the drinkware upside down on the table.

     

    Sure, wash your hands, but carry a little container of sanitizer in your pocket or purse and use it just before you start your meal.

     

    45 plus cruises, ranging from 7 to 49 nights,  so far totaling almost a year and a half at sea and by following my own advice I've never, ever been sick on a cruise.

     

    All you need to do is break the chain of contamination.


  10. One can handle and touch all sorts of common-use surfaces, some of which are undoubtedly contaminated, including the door handle of the restroom on the way out, the handrails, serving ladles in the buffet, gambling chips in the casino, and so on.

     

    The key, as I stated before, is to break the chain of contamination, especially in a public environment.  Washing your hands and then touching a host of contaminated surfaces does little unless you sanitize your hands just before you start to eat.

     

    Keep the little beasties out of your mouth.


  11. 9 minutes ago, Iamcruzin said:

    I’ve suggested that on other boards. Celebrity was forced to reinvent formal night because they segregated the dining experience so much with a special DR or Aqua class and a special DR for suite guests. Neither required formal nights. formal Dress  was only required in the MDR for the steerage class.

     I suspect the demographics of the cruisers attracted by the various cruise lines is also a big factor in what one can expect to see as being dressed for dinner on formal nights.  We expect a certain decorum when cruising on the QM2 and the vast majority of the cruisers respect it.  When we cruise on Viking, every night is smart/resort casual and again, the vast majority of the cruisers respect it.  

     

    It does seem, however, that some cruise lines attact a demographic who, for whatever the reason, treat the ship and their fellow PAX as if they are on a party barge.

     

    Fortunatly, there are plenty of ships on the seas.


  12. It's easy to tell who didn't wash their hands - they are the ones with noro.

     

    While handwashing is indeed the best defense, how many common contact surfaces do you touch after you wash your hands and before you pop that roll into your mouth?

     

    Food ladles, beverage dispenser handles, the menu, the bottom of your chair as you pulled it in, the salt/pepper shakers, the table top itself? Was the table preset with drinking glasses/cups placed upside down on the table surface?  If so, take a few moments to see how the tables have been cleaned in between diners.  I've sat and watched the crew take a used cloth napkin and wipe the table with it and then reset the table with the drinkware upside down on the table.

     

    Sure, wash your hands, but carry a little container of sanitizer in your pocket or purse and use it just before you start your meal.

     

    45 plus cruises, ranging from 7 to 49 nights,  so far totaling almost a year and a half at sea and by following my own advice I've never, ever been sick on a cruise.

     

    All you need to do is break the chain of contamination.


  13. 54 minutes ago, Chianti Cowboy said:

    Sargasso said that SOLAS and cruise line policy is that they must not be stored in the cabin. Therefore the question.

    This is exactly how misinformation is spread on CC.

    My apologies cowboy. Should've deleted the word not.  The mobility devices are not to be stored in the corridor, but are to be stored in the cabin when not in use.

     

    I know better and am sorry for the error 


  14. 20 minutes ago, Charles4515 said:


    So what if it is not the real reason. Or if it is just an excuse. Whatever the reason they just don’t don’t want to wear a dinner jacket, sport coat or suit.  No reason for you to waste your time weighing clothes. On Royal Caribbean it’s their choice. Weighing clothes is not going to change their mind.  There is nothing you can do about it.    
     

     

     It took about three minutes tops to weigh the two jacket and ties combos. No waste of time at all.  But isn't it humorous that the reason people throw out there for the reason they don't want to dress up is luggage restrictions?

     

    What's next?  Bathrobe and flip flops in the MDR because they don't feel like dressing for dinner at all?

     

     

     

     


  15. 6 hours ago, Iamcruzin said:

    I'm not sold on the airline luggage excuse and wish people would just come out and say they just don't want to dress up. Those still blaming the airlines are only kidding themselves. No need to bring a suit unless you want to and women's formal wear hasn't had any weight to it since the 80's with the heavy fabrics and shoulder pads.

     

    I  was curious enough the airline excessive luggage excuse, so I broke out my digital scale to see what dressing up for formal night would mean on anyone's luggage allowance.  I didn't count trousers, shoes, or shirts since those can be worn on multiple evenings on the ship. The variable for a man to look dressed up for formal/gala/whatever the cruise line calls it is a dinner jacket and tie ( and I forgo the tie on my ensemble)  With all of this being said, I weighed a sport coat and two ties and then weighed a suit jacket and two ties.

     

    The sport coat and ties weighed 2 lbs 2 oz.

    The suit coat and ties weighed 2 lbs even.

     

    I don't think two pounds is the real reason - it's just an excuse.

     

     


  16. 1 hour ago, Iamcruzin said:

    I bet if they set up a formal event and charged $500 a person for a limited amount of guests, people  would be climbing over each other to book it like they do for the $1600 cabana's. Remember if the price drops you can cancel and rebook it.

     I always like your thoughts here.  One of the two seatings could be designated formal with a special benefit or two and the other as casual "my way" dress suggestion.  That way the formals wouldn't be forced to eat with the Golden Corral folks.  They class system is already at work with suite benefits, why not extend it to people who want a more refined dining experience?

     

    We cruise back and forth to Europe on the QM2. Their dress code is well known and we pack accordingly.  I wouldn't expect to show up for dinner in shorts, a wife beater, my ballcap on backwards, and expect to be seated.

     

     


  17. Regarding the "luggage restrictions" excuse, has anyone actually weighed "formal" wear?

     

    As I've stated before, I can get dressed up enough to pass for "formal" nights nowadays with a pair of black slacks, a black ribbed T-shirt, and a black sport coat.  They don't take up that much room, they don't weigh that much, and I look better than half of the men in there who can't be bothered to dress for dinner.

     

    What one wears in any social setting speaks volumes about the person and is the face that one presents to the world.  Dress for Golden Corral one way, but in a more elegant setting the Golden Corral duds should be put aside.

     


  18. 6 hours ago, donaldsc said:

     

    My understanding is that scooters must be kept in your room.   I promptly report any scooters that I see in the hall and most of the time they are removed.  If they aren't, I report them a 2nd, 3rd or 4th time.

     

    DPN

     Me too, donaldsc.  I keep after the the ship's  management until they correct the situation.  SOLAS and any fire code that one wishes to apply is clear - exit corridors must be kept clear and every cruise line has a policy that mobility devices must not be stored in the cabin when not in use.  There are no exceptions for little out of the way corners and such.  PLUS, more often than not, a scooter parked in the corridor often hinders other scooter users from getting past.  

     

    That being said, there is a specialty thread here on Cruise Critic that is a wealth of information about cruising with scooters and other mobility devices.


  19. On 11/18/2019 at 12:07 PM, franski said:

    We did RT in early October - boarded the Kong Harald on October 2nd.  We had rain (of course) in Bergen (we spent 2 nights there before getting on the boat...) - and then had marvelous weather for the entire trip.  There were a couple of misty times - but overall, clear and cool.  Of course, we needed hats/mitts/warm coats for our time on deck - but overall, nothing "brutal" on the weather front.  In fact, at one point - I ran out on deck with my sandals on - no socks... and I was fine.  Although, some might say that being from Canada, the "cold" wasn't that much out of line for us...   We were expecting colder once we crossed into the Arctic Circle - but were pleasantly surprised.  

     

    Thanks, franski, that's encouraging.  There is the old saying, "There's no such thing as bad weather, just inappropriate clothing"

     


  20. She Who Must Be Obeyed and her cabin boy are D+, so we just cannot see the value of the key for anyone with any status on Royal. 

     

    Put the pencil to it and see if it is worth it for what you get, especially if you are in a big rush to get on the ship, in a big rush to get off the ship, and don't mind paying extra to eat lunch in the MDR on boarding day, and want to use a lot of internet.

     

    As for us, we cruise to relax.


  21. 3 hours ago, davekathy said:

    Agree. If what someone is wearing is cool with the staff at the entrance to the MDR, that's all that matters. 

    The staff at the entrance are scared to call anyone out for inappropriate MDR dress for fear of upsetting the person and receiving less than a 10.  The staff's careers live and die by the 10.  Thus, enforcement of most anything - feral children running wild, chair hogs, card players claiming tables in the buffet, and appropriate attire in the MDR has fallen by the wayside.

     

    If people don't care to clean up for the MDR and follow the norms for dining attire in a more elegant setting, the buffet is always available.  

     

    Clothes make the person and what one wears in different social settings speaks volumes.  

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