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Harry Peterson

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About Harry Peterson

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  1. That’s interesting. I doubt they’d successfully persuade the FoS that ‘specific area’ could include a ship, but I bet they’d try!
  2. I said this: It may, but the hard fact remains that the older you get the greater the risk of serious outcomes from Covid. The risk of death is around 600 times greater for 65-75 year olds than for under 25s, and 1500 times greater for 75-85 year olds. Those figures came from official US statistics, which you challenged, claiming that the UK figures didn't support them. These are the official UK statistics, with the under 25 figure (because risk increases quite rapidly with age) likely to be much closer to 2 than 531. It only has to be 10.64, which it may well be, to substantiate the American-based 1500 times figure which you, on the basis of no evidence at all, claim to be 'so untrue as to be laughable'. Age Deaths Up to 14 2 15-44 531 45-64 4738 65-74 7282 75-84 15962 85+ 20852 You can believe what you like. If you choose to think the risk isn't dramatically higher for over 70s than young people (despite what the government believes), that's your choice. I'm wasting no more time on this. I understand risk, and I understand statistics. I'll go with the statistics - you go with your gut reaction.
  3. No new calculator needed - look at the age groups when you're comparing the two. Ignore all the figures if you like, but are you really suggesting there isn't a dramatic ramping up of risk as you get older? 15962/2 = 7981 by the way, and 15962/10.64 = 1500 10.64 may well be about right for the under-25s
  4. The ONS says this about those stats, but it's not really the totals that I was referring to - more the age split. Statistically you're pretty unlikely to die from Covid if you're in the younger age groups, but substantially more likely to die in the older age groups that tend to cruise. And it's not just the deaths - it's the evidence now emerging of substantial long-term health problems even for those who survive. Deaths involving COVID-19 Up to 19 June 2020, there were 49,371 deaths registered in England and Wales involving the coronavirus (COVID-19) (27,185 men and 22,186 women). The majority of deaths involving COVID-19 have been among people aged 65 years and over (44,096 out of 49,371). Our data are based on deaths registered in England and Wales and include all deaths where “COVID-19” was mentioned on death certificates.
  5. These are the official UK ONS statistics: Age Deaths Up to 14 2 15-44 531 45-64 4738 65-74 7282 75-84 15962 85+ 20852 Not so very different. No real risk for the young, but substantial risks for older people.
  6. Officially published US statistics. They won’t obviously be absolutely accurate, but the broad thrust is unlikely to be far out. It’s very dramatically more dangerous for older people than younger people, which is why the Foreign Office advises over 70s not to cruise, which invalidates any insurance.
  7. It may, but the hard fact remains that the older you get the greater the risk of serious outcomes from Covid. The risk of death is around 600 times greater for 65-75 year olds than for under 25s, and 1500 times greater for 75-85 year olds.
  8. Given, John, that the current FCO advice means that anyone over 70 or with various underlying health conditions will be uninsured if they choose to cruise, maybe the cruise companies are banking on a much younger market who will be less inclined to compare what’s on offer now with pre-CV days. British nationals aged 70 and over, and those with underlying health conditions such as chronic diseases and diabetes, have been advised not to travel on cruise ships in response to the coronavirus outbreak. Harry
  9. Bearing in mind your husband’s age and medical condition, there’s quite a serious risk of course should he contract Covid-19. Are you fully insured for all pre-existing conditions?
  10. Always gone to Barnard Castle for my eye tests. No restrictions in place there at all.
  11. I'm sure everyone would like to get on with life, rather than locking themselves up as you put it, but some people have medical conditions which make that very high risk indeed. Meaning that contact with the virus would be almost certainly fatal. Not everyone is in a position to make the same choices.
  12. Perception of personal risk is the key issue for those concerned about safety, as against a less than positive cruise experience. And there’s strong survey evidence showing that most people can’t assess risk with the remotest degree of accuracy. Hence the perception that children attending school are at risk of dying from Covid, when the real risk is lower for that age group than the risk of crossing the road to school. Older teachers are at far greater risk. It has a lot more to do with the age and underlying health of individual passengers than cruising itself.
  13. A point very well made. It’s very much a leap in the dark at the moment, but understandably so perhaps, given that nobody knows where we’ll be with this virus even a month down the line. Personally, cruising is very much off the agenda until things become a great deal clearer.
  14. Sorry to have wasted people's time with this thread - disappointingly ITV! ☹️
  15. Very interesting. All sounds eminently sensible, but it doesn't exactly sound like an appealing holiday.
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