What is done with the salt after making fresh water?

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#1
Holland
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Joined Oct 2014
An explanation of the distillation of seawater is shown in this video of the QM2

At "more than a thousand tonnes" of fresh water used on QM2 daily, and about 35g/kg salinity (Wiki), that's 35,000kg/77.000 pounds of salt/day.

One thing I don't understand is that by the looks of it, the way they remove the resulting salt wavers it can't be that much.

The other is: what do they do with it? Dumping anything in the sea seems forbidden, but returning salt a few hours later shouldn't be a problem? If it is kept on board, could I buy some?
#2
In the kamloops in the dry and hottest part of BC
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Joined Aug 2006
Originally posted by AmazedByCruising
An explanation of the distillation of seawater is shown in this video of the QM2

At "more than a thousand tonnes" of fresh water used on QM2 daily, and about 35g/kg salinity (Wiki), that's 35,000kg/77.000 pounds of salt/day.

One thing I don't understand is that by the looks of it, the way they remove the resulting salt wavers it can't be that much.

The other is: what do they do with it? Dumping anything in the sea seems forbidden, but returning salt a few hours later shouldn't be a problem? If it is kept on board, could I buy some?
I think it is 3.5g/kg of water . Remember that the salt isn't pure salt . It has other impurities that you can't use . Since the water comes from the sea there will all sort junk in it.
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#3
Holland
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Joined Oct 2014
Originally posted by Kamloops50
I think it is 3.5g/kg of water . Remember that the salt isn't pure salt . It has other impurities that you can't use . Since the water comes from the sea there will all sort junk in it.
I got the 35g/kg from Wikipedia, but even at 3.5g/kg there's still a huge amount of salt left.

There are more uses than eating it. You could create seawater with the exact right ingredients for use in aquariums, another use is to make my own little Dead Sea experience in a tub. And if it's not too contaminated, it could actually be sold for eating. Fleur de sel comes directly from the sea as well. Caribbean Ocean Salt would do nice next to Himalaya, Celtic and even smoked Norwegian salts I can find in shops.
#4
Palm City, Fl
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It may be distributed to the bars onboard for use on Margarita glasses.
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#5
Jensen Beach, FL
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Originally posted by AmazedByCruising
An explanation of the distillation of seawater is shown in this video of the QM2

At "more than a thousand tonnes" of fresh water used on QM2 daily, and about 35g/kg salinity (Wiki), that's 35,000kg/77.000 pounds of salt/day.

One thing I don't understand is that by the looks of it, the way they remove the resulting salt wavers it can't be that much.

The other is: what do they do with it? Dumping anything in the sea seems forbidden, but returning salt a few hours later shouldn't be a problem? If it is kept on board, could I buy some?
Now you know why the food tastes so salty!
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#9
6,250 Posts
Joined Jul 2007
LOL...dumping salt in seawater is not prohibited. It has a negligible impact on the salinity of the ocean.
#10
Silver Spring, Maryland
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After all, what happensto the salt when the H2O evaporation from the sea? Someone can't just pick up all that salt from the ocean when liquid becomes a gas right?
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#11
Las Vegas
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Although I do not know the answer, I can not see what harm putting the salt back into the ocean from whence it came can do any harm to anything. It is not as if you are putting something into the ocean that was not already there.

DON
#12
Florida
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Originally posted by ehfl
Thanks for the laugh. 77 lbs per day is perfectly safe to dump back into the ocean.
That is all😀
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#13
Winter: Sun City Grand Surprise , AZ & Summer: Prescott, AZ
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I think Viking puts it in the soup they serve! We were on the Embla in April the soups were so salty they were awful!


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#14
Georgia
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Looking forward to a definitive answer. All I could find from searching the Internet pertained to on-short desalination, such as this:
Q: What happens to the salt once it is removed from the seawater?
A: The concentrated saltwater is mixed with the circulating cooling water of the AES Generating Station, significantly diluting the concentrated seawater, and released back into the ocean, where it will be further diluted and dissipated to meet all local, state and federal standards including California’s Ocean Plan standards.
http://hbfreshwater.com/desalination-101
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#15
california
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Originally posted by goldenrod
I think Viking puts it in the soup they serve! We were on the Embla in April the soups were so salty they were awful!


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That might be funny but you were cruising on rivers which are fresh water. Might want to learn science and geography between rants.
#16
Winter: Sun City Grand Surprise , AZ & Summer: Prescott, AZ
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Originally posted by wheezedr
That might be funny but you were cruising on rivers which are fresh water. Might want to learn science and geography between rants.


Your right, the truth is the food on the Viking Embla a least on our 21 day trip was Awful, it's so nice to have a nasty jerk like yourself, give me the opportunity to express that again!


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#17
United States
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Joined Jul 2014
Originally posted by ehfl
LOL...dumping salt in seawater is not prohibited. It has a negligible impact on the salinity of the ocean.
It is in some jurisdictions.

Really.

I had for a client years ago a salt company. When at their facility in MD, I noticed the entire paved area had a 6+ inch high curb. SO I asked why?

The reason was, the State of Maryland required them to capture all the run off from rain on there paved area and test the salinity before releasing it. INTO THE CHESAPEAKE BAY, which is estuarian (partially salty, less than the ocean).

But the salinity of the bay varies from month to month and year to year.

STUPID.

Never underestimate the stupidity of government agencies.
#18
Low Country, SC
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Joined Dec 2005
It isn't dry salt, the flash evaporators have two outputs, fresh water from one spot and brine from the other, which is nothing but water with a lot more salt than regular sea water. It just gets pumped overboard when out to sea.

FWIW, if they use the same process we used in the Navy, the water is boiled at about 5 inches of vacuum which reduces the boiling temp to about 145F. Therefore they won't "make" water when near shore, since the water is usually much dirtier, and often polluted with sewage and other such nasties. Therefore they also chlorinate the water to ensure the nasties are dead.

Hope that helps.
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#19
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Originally posted by ehfl
Thanks for the laugh. 77 lbs per day is perfectly safe to dump back into the ocean.
Except it's 77,000 lbs, not 77 lbs.
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#20
Holland
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Originally posted by wraithe
It isn't dry salt, the flash evaporators have two outputs, fresh water from one spot and brine from the other, which is nothing but water with a lot more salt than regular sea water. It just gets pumped overboard when out to sea.
Unfortunately, the original video I posted was removed. I remember that it showed dry salt which was put in bags.
Maybe most salt is removed as brine, but at least some of it is "harvested" as dry salt before being thrown overboard.

I have bought sea salt in France before, which was quite expensive. So, if a ship arrives in Rotterdam and happens to have stored a few tonnes of salt, I'd certainly be interested.