Stop bringing non-service animals on ships

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UK
145 Posts
Joined May 2014
Am I correct in thinking this would only be an issue on cruises departing from the US?
I cannot imagine those people who have non-essential dogs e.g. 'fur babies' etc going to the trouble of acquiring the correct documentation to import their animal to whichever country their cruise departs from.
Maine
12,079 Posts
Joined Feb 2013
Originally posted by RandallFlagg
Like I said - this is what's wrong with this screwy system - someone, like yourself, defends someone carting their cute little Pomeranian through a grocery store restaurant and you ask "How many handicapped parking tags are fraudulent".

I rest my case.
Please point out where I defended allowing a dog to be in a shopping cart. Please point out where I defended someone bringing a non-service dog into a business. A Pomeranian can be a trained service animal, trained to alert the owner when blood sugar levels drop dangerously. Generally this is caused by the dog detecting ketones in the owner's breath. For this reason, many of these dogs need to be close to the owner's face. The ADA, as I've posted before on this thread, and many others, only allows for service animals to be in two places, either on the floor, or in the owner's arms (for cases like the one I just mentioned). It does not allow for them to be in a shopping cart or a baby stroller.

I said, quite clearly, that businesses have the legal right to remove someone who claims their dog is an ESA, for any reason, and to remove a genuine service animal, if it is ill behaved. Other than that, I am in support of the law requiring businesses being required to accommodate service animals for those that need them. I would hope that should you ever need a mobility assistance device, whether it be a cane, walker, roller, wheelchair, or scooter, that you would never be denied access to businesses because of that usage, which is apparently what you are advocating, unless you haven't made your position clear.

I am not a fan of the aspect of the law that does not require registration or certification of service animals, but I do understand why it is there, a fully trained service animal can cost tens of thousands of dollars. Who pays for this? Do we deny someone a service dog that allows a person to live on their own because they cannot pay this? Or do we subsidize the service dog training industry? You tell me. My comment on fraudulent HC tags was to show that even if there would be a requirement to register or certify service animals, there can still be cases of fraud, just like with the HC tags.
Maine
12,079 Posts
Joined Feb 2013
Originally posted by sailing canary
Am I correct in thinking this would only be an issue on cruises departing from the US?
I cannot imagine those people who have non-essential dogs e.g. 'fur babies' etc going to the trouble of acquiring the correct documentation to import their animal to whichever country their cruise departs from.
Well, for the Caribbean in general, all you need is an international vet certificate and a microchip in the dog to allow the dog into the country. Not everywhere is as strict as the UK or the EU on dog importation restrictions. But, also, I don't believe that there are many, if any, laws in the EU requiring businesses to give access to service animals, so it would be up to each business (or cruise ship) to set their own requirements. In the UK, businesses are required to make "reasonable exemptions" to their policies (like no dogs) for service animals, but cannot deny services based on the person's use of a service animal, per the Equality Act (as I see it).
Michigan
2,797 Posts
Joined Aug 2012
Originally posted by Underwatr
One catch, per the ADA language someone else posted, is that one task a service animal may perform is calming someone with PTSD. Given that an establishment isn't permitted to ask about the particular disability there's a very fine line between ADA-permitted "calming" and an emotional support animal.

No wonder establishments choose to err on the side of permissiveness.
It needs to be a bit more than "calming" to meet the standard as a service animal. Sitting to be petted is not sufficubent. The dog has to perform an actual task like getting the phone, pressing their head against the owner's chest, licking their hand, getting meds, etc.
United States
14,865 Posts
Joined Aug 2013
Ironically, cruise lines fought against ADA compliance citing that their ships are foreign flagged. I am not sure if cruise ships in 2018 are required to meet the same compliance for ADA as land based businesses in the United States. Does anyone know that status?