Ever wondered what a crew cabin looks like?

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#21
Shalimar FL
5,754 Posts
Joined Jan 2008
As mentioned before, as a junior officer, I had a SR that had 6 bunks and two sinks, with a ‘head’ down the passageway. As a medium grade, I shared a SR with one other guy (two bunks) and again a sink. As a senior officer I got a single rack SR, but the same size as the other two-person SRs, and ‘head’ down the passageway. My sailors had three-tier rack bunks with minimal storage and shared the space with a large number all in one space. The most senior had more room, usually a bit more space for meetings, but not much.

That’s Life on a ship where space was premium, just as it is for the crew on any cruise ship; main or luxury. You learn how to give each other ‘space’ where little space exists.

I’ve got a kick out of listening to someone complain about their small SR or little storage in front of or even to crew......and the crew don’t fall down laughing, they just shake their heads agreeing how terrible it all is for the poor passenger.

Den
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#22
Maine or at sea
13,961 Posts
Joined Feb 2013
Our onboard internet doesn't do video, so I can't see the cabin, but from the descriptions, that sounds like a junior officer/supervisor level single (third engineer, third officer, deck supervisor for cabin stewards, head bartender, etc, basically your one-stripers). And, also as noted, this is a "perk" cabin. Cabin status is one of the few perks the crew get as they move up the hierarchy. By far, the majority of crew share a cabin about 9 x 12, that sleeps 4. Two sets of bunks separated by about 3 feet, with a tiny writing desk between, the bathroom smaller than a pax bathroom, 4 lockers, 4 under bed drawers, and a desk chair. There are even 6 person cabins. I've known third engineers to bring their wives to sail with them (another perk of rank), and two people have lived in one of those single cabins for 10 months. What I call a strong marriage. More senior officers get larger cabins, right up to the Captain, Chief Engineer, and Hotel Director, who have suites.

Problems come when you lock the connecting door in the shower/toilet, and forget to unlock it when done, your "neighbor" can get real agitated with you about not being able to use the facilities.

And, I agree with all of the former "gray funnel line" posters, all accommodations on cruise ships is better than naval vessels, for all levels.
#23
604 Posts
Joined Jun 2006
Three thoughts.

First, guy is lucky to have own cabin. I thought that was reserved for officers, lead performers, and a few select others (he must be one of those).

Second, only slightly smaller than my first inside cabin on the SS Norway. Considering I shared it (upper/lower bunks), this crew member actually has more room per person, though we did have our own shower.

Third, a LOT more room than most US Navy enlisted have on ships and submarines. And more than many junior officers, some of whom must "hot bunk" (meaning you share the same bunk because you're on different watch sections so sleep at different times) and nearly all of whom share a stateroom

When you're working almost all of the time (true on cruise ships and USN ships), your cabin is really little more than a place to sleep and maybe do some work. Thus, having a place that's quiet is important. Having any space to yourself is a luxury!
#24
7,975 Posts
Joined Feb 2007
Originally posted by ggo85
Three thoughts.

First, guy is lucky to have own cabin. I thought that was reserved for officers, lead performers, and a few select others (he must be one of those).
I believe I've read somewhere that some of the performers (pianist in piano bar, comedian and the like, not the singers and dancers in the main theater shows) are booked in regular passenger cabins for their relatively short stints on board (compared to regular crew who work for months at a time). I'm sure it varies though.
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#25
atlanta
5,784 Posts
Joined Aug 2004
Tight fit, but I am sure a great experience of working on a cruise ship for at least one contract.
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#30
Kent, UK
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Joined Jun 2005
Originally posted by chengkp75
Then again, you are not subject to random alcohol testing, with a 0.04 limit, 24 hours a day, every day.
And Celebrity has a very strict policy regarding alcohol. No second chances!
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#31
Maine or at sea
13,961 Posts
Joined Feb 2013
Originally posted by Esprit
And Celebrity has a very strict policy regarding alcohol. No second chances!
Most of the lines (if not all), are that way, since the alcohol limits are set by international conventions and must be a part of the company's ISM code.
#32
Kent, UK
2,011 Posts
Joined Jun 2005
Originally posted by chengkp75
Most of the lines (if not all), are that way, since the alcohol limits are set by international conventions and must be a part of the company's ISM code.
The offender is brought before the Captain (usually the next day) with another crew member in attendance (manager/supervisor). The incident is logged and the offender dismissed instantly, no matter where in the world. They then have to pay their way back home!
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#34
UK
1,649 Posts
Joined Jul 2014
Originally posted by chengkp75
Then again, you are not subject to random alcohol testing, with a 0.04 limit, 24 hours a day, every day.
Is that 40 milligrammes of alcohol per 100 millilitres?


The English drink drive limit is only 80 milligrammes of alcohol per 100 millilitres. If you're over that you'll lose your driving license. One of the cocktails served in the Martini bar could in theory put you over this limit so the crew don't have much chance...
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#35
Huntington,WV and Backus, MN by way of Canada
715 Posts
Joined Dec 2012
Ex Infantry - dig trench - sleep in trench. I would of killed to sleep in that cabin especially when on exercise in Canada in the winter
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#36
Maine or at sea
13,961 Posts
Joined Feb 2013
Originally posted by Mynki
Is that 40 milligrammes of alcohol per 100 millilitres?


The English drink drive limit is only 80 milligrammes of alcohol per 100 millilitres. If you're over that you'll lose your driving license. One of the cocktails served in the Martini bar could in theory put you over this limit so the crew don't have much chance...
I think you may mean 80mg per 1000 ml, or 0.08%. You would be totally sloshed at 80mg per 100 ml. We measure in %, so, yes that is 40mg per liter. And, in the US, driving impaired is typically 0.08%, so mariners have half the allowance. Fairly comforting when you think they are responsible for your safety. Typically, crew bar only sells beer and wine, not cocktails, though I can't see the youtube to see what pricing is linked. Be a bit surprised if Celebrity sold hard liquor in crew bar, but they may. In the US, if crew measures over 0.04%, they can lose their merchant mariner credential, and any chance of a shipboard job until rehab is completed. Many lines also restrict the top officers (Captain, Staff Captain, Chief, Staff Chief, and Hotel Director) to 0% alcohol at all times.
#37
3,559 Posts
Joined Jun 2002
Originally posted by chengkp75
I think you may mean 80mg per 1000 ml, or 0.08%. You would be totally sloshed at 80mg per 100 ml. We measure in %, so, yes that is 40mg per liter. And, in the US, driving impaired is typically 0.08%, so mariners have half the allowance. Fairly comforting when you think they are responsible for your safety. Typically, crew bar only sells beer and wine, not cocktails, though I can't see the youtube to see what pricing is linked. Be a bit surprised if Celebrity sold hard liquor in crew bar, but they may. In the US, if crew measures over 0.04%, they can lose their merchant mariner credential, and any chance of a shipboard job until rehab is completed. Many lines also restrict the top officers (Captain, Staff Captain, Chief, Staff Chief, and Hotel Director) to 0% alcohol at all times.
It depends on whether we’re measuring alcohol in blood or breath. Drinkaware says: “In England and Wales, the alcohol limit for drivers is 80 milligrammes of alcohol per 100 millilitres of blood, 35 microgrammes per 100 millilitres of breath or 107 milligrammes per 100 millilitres of urine.”
#39
Amsterdam, Europe
4,809 Posts
Joined Jun 2012
Originally posted by chengkp75
Be a bit surprised if Celebrity sold hard liquor in crew bar, but they may.
Can confirm, been in the crew bar on a behind the scenes tour on Reflection this summer.
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#40
2,350 Posts
Joined Oct 2009
Maybe it is just an urban legend, but I think I remember stories of the staff partying pretty hard (at least some of the time)...enough that they would easily be over the limits mentioned here...I would bet as long as things don't get out of hand mgmt lets them be adults and doesn't go out of their way to look for reasons to test them.