All 21 Antarctica Daily Heralds and Dining Guides + Provided Items Here (Feb. 2018)

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#1
25 Posts
Joined Jul 2010
This post is for all the adventure seekers out there who like to get their hands on as much information as possible. In this case, all things Seabourn Quest in Antarctica. Contemplating going? Already booked? Then here’s an additional resource to get a feel for what makes Seabourn’s Ultimate Antarctica and Patagonia itinerary so special.

There’s tons of information about the Seabourn Quest and sister Odyssey Class ships on the Internet with regard to standardized service, amenities, dining, suite features, entertainment, and activities. The focus here is to highlight all the things that make this particular voyage unique. I’ve scanned all the daily Heralds and dining guides and made sure to photograph all the included extras that are specific to this itinerary.

Info includes my observations and Seabourn provided info on:
  • Antarctica Kayak Adventure
  • Zodiac and group landing processes
  • Strategically planning suite location and which month to go
  • Provided parka, beanie and backpack
  • Visitor guidelines to Antarctica
  • How to manage expectations
  • Other materials provided only after you board
Just my way to give back after reading so much on Cruise Critic!

https://patrickinantarctica.com/2018/02/25/543/
#2
Melbourne, Australia
440 Posts
Joined Dec 2010
Thank you Patrick for posting all this information, brilliant for those that haven't been on Quest to Antarctica and great reminiscences for those that have.
My comment on the backpack: I have used mine daily since returning over 1200 days ago, it is definitely NOT waterproof and hardly showerproof, everything put inside needs to go into plastic bags.
#3
Sydney, Australia
31 Posts
Joined Dec 2013
Thank you so much for providing this excellent resource. You have given great insight into so many aspects of our upcoming cruise.

We are very much looking forward to our Antarctic adventure departing Lima in November.
#4
Minnesota & California
36 Posts
Joined Aug 2012
Originally posted by FLgemini
This post is for all the adventure seekers out there who like to get their hands on as much information as possible. In this case, all things Seabourn Quest in Antarctica. Contemplating going? Already booked? Then here’s an additional resource to get a feel for what makes Seabourn’s Ultimate Antarctica and Patagonia itinerary so special.



There’s tons of information about the Seabourn Quest and sister Odyssey Class ships on the Internet with regard to standardized service, amenities, dining, suite features, entertainment, and activities. The focus here is to highlight all the things that make this particular voyage unique. I’ve scanned all the daily Heralds and dining guides and made sure to photograph all the included extras that are specific to this itinerary.



Info includes my observations and Seabourn provided info on:
  • Antarctica Kayak Adventure
  • Zodiac and group landing processes
  • Strategically planning suite location and which month to go
  • Provided parka, beanie and backpack
  • Visitor guidelines to Antarctica
  • How to manage expectations
  • Other materials provided only after you board
Just my way to give back after reading so much on Cruise Critic!



https://patrickinantarctica.com/2018/02/25/543/


We are considering this cruise in December, what suite location do you recommend? Your blog is excellent!



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#6
UK
910 Posts
Joined Oct 2008
We booked Deck 5 but were upgraded to Deck 7 - we liked that because we could just nip down to Seabourn Square for an early morning coffee . . .
#7
25 Posts
Joined Jul 2010
Thank you everyone for the compliments so far. I'm glad there are others out there in cyberspace who find this info interesting!

To you AquariusCruiseGal, I concur with others who have already chimed in that Deck 5 is certainly convenient for zodiac and kayaking comings and goings, although that's only for a third of the time on the Antarctica/Patagonia voyage. The Quest and Odyssey Class ships are brilliantly designed, so, regardless of itinerary, you can't go wrong on stateroom location anywhere. Personal preference and comfort all come into play: low and midship if prone to motion sickness (you never know what you'll get sailing in that part of the world); quick access to dining, entertainment and amenities you think you'll visit most often (like the Penthouse Spa Suites on the aft of the ship); budget; etc. It's a very manageable ship no matter where your stateroom is. That's what makes it so appealing.

We stayed in a Penthouse Suite on Deck 10 just a few doors down from the Observation Bar and loved, loved, loved the location. Being a scenic voyage, the Observation Bar was always a hub of activity, morning, noon and night as it offered incredible forward views both in the room and out on deck. Beyond just being a "bar," it also served light bites throughout the day, including pastries with early morning coffee, finger sandwiches and sweets with afternoon tea, and cold and hot hors d' oeuvres during evening cocktail hour. Rarely, if ever, was noise (crowd or live piano music) an issue inside our suite. Deck 10 also has a short, intimate hallway with fewer suites, so we got to know our neighbors well. Yes, we felt motion being high and forward, but nothing we didn't feel elsewhere on the ship in my opinion. For a three-week adventure, we valued the extra room of the Penthouse Suite over a standard Verandah Suite.

On the eastbound itinerary that I was on (San Antonio to Buenos Aires), port side faced the mountainous Chilean coast and beautiful Glacier Alley (four of them along the narrow passage) in Patagonia. On the westbound (Buenos Aires to San Antonio), that would then be starboard. In my opinion, suite location does not matter when in Antarctica. All of the views are amazing and the ship is constantly being repositioned because they are not allowed to drop anchor while in Antarctica. If think we even did a few 360s at one or two stops. Both port and starboard have the benefit of lots of natural sunlight because each side eventually has sunrise and sunset days in both north/south portions of the voyage.
#8
25 Posts
Joined Jul 2010
P.S.

There is no advantage to suite location between Antarctica and Buenos Aires (or vice versa). Not much to look at and more sea days. The scenic part of the itinerary is the 2/3 between San Antonio and Antarctica (or vice versa).

Many passengers also liked congregating in Seabourn Square on Deck 7 throughout the day. This is the coffee bar/cafe/library/passenger services desk/shops/outside aft viewing area. It was here and the Observation Bar where Seabourn Wildlife Guides were stationed, watching and offering commentary.

When it comes to stateroom selection on any ship, always follow the rule: choose a stateroom with other staterooms above, below, beside, and across from you. These provide buffers from noise in public venues or staff areas. Be aware of blank white spaces on deck plans. Those are usually housekeeping, engineering, and staff stairs and elevators. Avoid a connecting stateroom, unless you intend to use the connector.

On Seabourn Odyssey class ships (such as the Quest) it is best to avoid midship suites on Deck 7 just below the pool deck on Deck 8 as others have reported hearing occasional footsteps and chair dragging. I've stayed in a Penthouse Suite on Deck 9 right next to the forward elevators and never heard any mechanical or passenger noise in the suite from the elevator lobby.
#9
Brisbane Australia
88 Posts
Joined Jan 2011
What a great blog! Thank you for putting the time and effort in, we feel we must go to Antarctica now that we have seen the photos and read about the whole experience.

Have just booked on the Quest November 2019 Antarctic voyage!
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Seabourn - 54 nights at sea
Coming up:
Seabourn Sojourn - Seward to Vancouver. September 2018
Seaborne Quest - San Antonio to Buenos Aires. November 2019
#10
Atlanta,GA
1,840 Posts
Joined Mar 2006
Thank you for this wonderful blog and post. The time you took to do this is remarkable. Again, much appreciated. We sail on the Quest in July for our first Seabourn cruise so this has really given us an idea of things we will enjoy.
#11
12 Posts
Joined Dec 2017
So glad I found this information. It answered most of my questions. Thank you so much!
We are booked on the first Antarctic cruise of this season, Nov. 4 from Miami to Buenos Aires are are really looking forward to it.
#12
Oakland, CA USA
2,309 Posts
Joined Jan 2013
Patrick: Thank you for all of this. We are booked on the Quest for November/Dec, 2018, so this is very, very useful.

One question for you and others regarding gear: What about boots? Do we rent those?

Thanks in advance...Tom
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#13
Oakland, CA USA
2,309 Posts
Joined Jan 2013
Well it looks as though one rents the boots from Seabourn, and maybe by ordering them before we board.

So I should ask, is there any gear or clothing that we should bring from home for the Antarctic adventure?
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Cunard: 109 Days
Seabourn: 68 Days
Azamara: 64 Days
HAL: 59 Days
Crystal: 38 Days
Princess: 28 Days
Oceania: 14 Days
Celebrity: 14 Days
RCL: 7 Days
Commodore: 7 Days
Carnival: 3 Days
Goodtime II: 1 Day
#14
United States
547 Posts
Joined Apr 2013
Yes you are best off renting the boots from Seabourn as it would be one more big thing to have to carry in your luggage, and you do order them in advance of your voyage. Also they do a boot exchange in case what you ordered in advance does not fit.

I'd suggest bringing warm layers. Definitely 2 pair of gloves, one heavy and one light for taking pictures w/. And water proof pants for the landings, and warm pants for when you are outside the ship looking for wildlife.
#15
Oakland, CA USA
2,309 Posts
Joined Jan 2013
Originally posted by 2SailingNomads
Yes you are best off renting the boots from Seabourn as it would be one more big thing to have to carry in your luggage, and you do order them in advance of your voyage. Also they do a boot exchange in case what you ordered in advance does not fit.

I'd suggest bringing warm layers. Definitely 2 pair of gloves, one heavy and one light for taking pictures w/. And water proof pants for the landings, and warm pants for when you are outside the ship looking for wildlife.
Thanks Nomads! Helpful advice!
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Cunard: 109 Days
Seabourn: 68 Days
Azamara: 64 Days
HAL: 59 Days
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Princess: 28 Days
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RCL: 7 Days
Commodore: 7 Days
Carnival: 3 Days
Goodtime II: 1 Day
#16
United States
547 Posts
Joined Apr 2013
Originally posted by tv24
Thanks Nomads! Helpful advice!
Glad to help! And keep in mind that you will be departing and ending up in warm weather. Santiago was quite warm when we were there in December and BA was warm - but we had quite a bit of rain - in January. The part from Ushuaia to Santiago will mostly be warm weather although in the Fjords it was a bit chilly when out on the decks. We honestly did not find it to be very cold - but we are used to cold weather - only on one landing were we fully bundled up. Day time temps were usually between 32 - 38F when in Antarctica.
#17
25 Posts
Joined Jul 2010
If you plan to take advantage of any of the zodiac landings (the only way to get ashore in Antarctica), waterproof pull-on boots are a must. I agree, it is best to rent boots through Seabourn. They do this through a third-party vendor who will deliver them to the ship. Then at the end of the voyage, you just leave the rentals behind on the ship. There is an option to have rental boots delivered to your home (U.S. only), but skip that, or for that matter, taking your own if you already have a pair. Save weight and space in your luggage. You've spent thousands to get to Antarctica, what's another $80 per person for boot rentals? :-)

I'm happy to report that the rental boots are good quality and very utilitarian. My feet and socks were never wet from getting in and out of the zodiacs or from trekking in snow. Decent traction. As mentioned by 2SailingNomads, you'll have the opportunity to switch sizes onboard if the ones you ordered don't fit. Boots can only be pre-ordered prior to sailing as far as I know.

Link to boot rental here: https://seabourn.shiptoshoretraveler...als-antarctica

Side notes: you don't wear these boots to kayak if you purchase that excursion. They put you in full-body wet suits with built-in boots. Also, boots are kept in lockers in the zodiac staging area on Deck 5 aft. You don't keep them in your suite. Even if you do bring your own, they ask you to store them in lockers.

We also rented a single pair of trekking poles. Found them useful for the uneven terrain and where there was elevation. With two people, we split the pair up to have a pole each.

Seabourn has a suggested packing list for clothing in Antarctica. It pretty much follows what others recommend for any type of polar expedition. The list is buried on their website. Not the easiest information to navigate to. Here's a direct link: https://www.seabourn.com/pageByName/...ue&legacy=true

I followed the list exactly and was glad to have all elements throughout the colder portions of the voyage. Others may feel its overkill while others will feel that they can never put on enough to stay warm. It's all about individual comfort level and familiarity with colder climates. The shop onboard sold hand and feet warmers and some layered clothing.

Basically, it's layering so you can add or subtract clothing to get warmer or cooler. I already had a few of these items and bought additional items to supplement prior to leaving. My travel mate bought the package where all of the recommended cold weather items were waiting for him in the suite on embarkation (you own everything and take home with you). Pricey, but convenient. All of those items were good quality and generally fit. There was no way to exchange anything once onboard.

I also suggest everyone heeds 2SailingNomads advice on warm weather clothing. I touch on that in my blog as well. This was in February:

Don’t forget to pack summer clothes in addition to all the cold weather layers you’ll need for Antarctica. It is summer after all in the southern hemisphere and shorts, linen pants, short-sleeved shirts, sundresses, and sandals were not out of place at the height of the day in San Antonio (Chile), Puerto Montt, Montevideo, and Buenos Aires. I found if it was sunny with no wind in these cities, it could be hot in direct sunlight, but pleasant in the shade. There were also a couple of days – including two sea days between the Falklands and Montevideo – where passengers were sunning out on deck in their bathing suits and enjoying the pool.
#18
Oakland, CA USA
2,309 Posts
Joined Jan 2013
Thanks Nomads & Flg: thanks for all the tips which I will file away and use! And we know about the warm weather...This will be a long voyage for us, boarding in Miami and passing through the Canal and past Ecuador and Peru before we hit Chile. And then we are returning to Chile by air after we leave in BA. AND, this will be our long-awaited return to Seabourn after a 4 + years hiatus; just haven't found the right itinerary. Thanks again, we will be prepared, thanks to you, and looking forward to a true adventure!
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Cunard: 109 Days
Seabourn: 68 Days
Azamara: 64 Days
HAL: 59 Days
Crystal: 38 Days
Princess: 28 Days
Oceania: 14 Days
Celebrity: 14 Days
RCL: 7 Days
Commodore: 7 Days
Carnival: 3 Days
Goodtime II: 1 Day