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Ryndam or Rijndam

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Just a small question. Does anybody know why the Nieuw Amsterdam is spelled in the Dutch language (Nieuw/New), while the Ryndam is spelled in an unknown language? It not spelled in Dutch which would result in Rijndam and it is neither spelled in the English language. Cause that would give Rhinedam.

 

Greetz,

SeaSheep

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Because it's a proper name. The ship is named for the city of New York, which the Dutch called Nieuw Amsterdam. Now why it's not Rhinedam, I don't know. :)

Edited by jtl513

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Thanks for your reply. But I used the Nieuw Amsterdam as an example My question is actually about the name of the Ryndam. :o

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Do a search for Dutch By Association (DBA). DBA is a HAL employee and has his email, website, etc on his posts. He'll be able to answer your question.

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Just a small question. Does anybody know why the Nieuw Amsterdam is spelled in the Dutch language (Nieuw/New), while the Ryndam is spelled in an unknown language? It not spelled in Dutch which would result in Rijndam and it is neither spelled in the English language. Cause that would give Rhinedam.

 

Greetz,

SeaSheep

 

I believe it was going to be called the Rijndam but the sales and marketing people thought this would be do difficult for non-Dutch passengers so they had it changed to the phonetic english Ryndam to make it easier to spell and pronounce.

Edited by bishop84

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Quite often when words are spelled in the Dutch language with a 'ij" it will be rewritten with a 'y'. This is also done with peoples' names. I think it's just easier to understand pronunciation with that spelling.

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Hi,

 

As a dutch speaking Belgian, I think the previous poster is right. In Belgium a lot of people have a name with the ij in it (Schrijvers, Stijnen....) Initialy all the names would have been written with the ij, but these days you will see that half of these names are spelled with an y, so I think that even dutch speaking people thought it was easier to spell these names with a y. It does make it easier to type. We will specify this with saying it is a y (without dots) or a ij (with dots) when we have to write the name down.

 

Regards,

Sonja

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The first Ryndam (1901-1929) was initially named Rijndam -

- However the spelling was changed during WW1 while she was commissioned under command of the US Navy in 1918, and HAL never changed the name back when she was returned to commercial service in 1919.

Since then, the second (1951-1973) and current (1994-Present) namesakes have been Ryndam.

Edited by bepsf

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Quite often when words are spelled in the Dutch language with a 'ij" it will be rewritten with a 'y'. This is also done with peoples' names. I think it's just easier to understand pronunciation with that spelling.

 

One example that comes to mind is Dutch footballer Rutgerus Johannes Martinus van Nistelrooij better known as Ruud van Nistelrooy. Okay, I'll admit to being a football fanatic. :D

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the immigration officer couldn't spell the name correctly and wrote it down as Ryndam. That's what happened to many European anmes during the great immigration.

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Thanks for all the answers. I understood that it was easier, but an ij and an y are different in my opinion. :p

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That is write it should be Rijndam that is a dutch word never with a y

But it isn't. And since the ship is leaving the fleet shortly, there's no point in trying to get it changed now.

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Hey Brian! Hope you see this one.

 

The story of the ships's name is quite easy and not as hard at all.

 

There are three ships in the fleet named:

 

RYNDAM (1) 1901 to 1929

 

RYNDAM (2) 1951 to 1971

 

RYNDAM (3) 1994 - 2015

 

 

When the first RYNDAM was built at Belfast by Harland & Wolff,

Yard Number 336. ( Check through the H&W building names.... in addition This name was you can find photographs with the name clearly seem on the bows and her stern.) It seems that the company made a decision to spell the name in English as RYNDAM instead as the Dutch name would have been as RIJNDAM. The RYNDAM (2) and the present RYNDAM (3) are also spelt this way.

 

Even from 1901 you can find books, documents, postcards etc... all with the name spelt as RIJNDAM. Never spelt that way though... just always RYNDAM.

 

Any photo or postcard with the name RIJNDAM is not 'real'... simply a retouch job on the photograph... by who ever did it!

 

During the Frist War the RYNDAM was chartered to the US Emergency Fleet Corporation. The charter started 21 March 1918 and served as a troopship. Returned to Holland America 22 October 1919. Her name was always as RYNDAM. For some reason the name appears in some documents and in some US fleet names as RIJNDAM. This includes many photos.... written on the front or on the back simply as USS RIJNDAM. But on the name on the ship was still as RYNDAM.

 

If you look for any book in Dutch text.... the name is written as RIJNDAM. Not two books: DROOMSCHEPEN - HOLLAND-AMERIKA LIJN (Dreamships of Holland America Line) by Arne Zuidhoek and also on the 'bible' 125 Jaar Holland-Amerika Lijn by C.J. de Boer. Both authors and any other Dutch text the names of all three ships are written as RIJNDAM.... but the name as painted in official register papers the names are RYNDAM.

 

I will look for a few photos to help.

 

Stephen

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Hey Brian! Hope you see this one.

Very interesting information, Stephen, but Brian may not see it. This thread is almost 5 years old!

 

The fact is that for whatever reason, the ship is named "Ryndam", and since it's a proper name, that is now the correct spelling when referring to the ship.

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A bit more...

 

 

Ryndam

The "Ryndam" was a 12,340 gross ton ship, built by Harland & Wolff, Belfast in 1901 for the Holland America Line. Her details were - length 550.3ft x beam 62.3ft, one funnel, two masts, twin screw and a speed of 15 knots. There was accommodation for 286-1st, 196-2nd and 1,800-3rd class passengers. Launched on 18/5/1901, she commenced her maiden voyage from Rotterdam to New York on 10/10/1901. On 18/1/1916 she was damaged by a mine in the North Sea, was repaired in Rotterdam and resumed the Rotterdam - New York service on 15/4/1916. On 21/3/1918 she was requisitioned by the US government for transport services, released in Oct.1919 and resumed the Rotterdam - New York service on 31/7/1920. In May 1925 she was refitted to carry cabin and 3rd class passengers, and in May 1926 altered to cabin, tourist and 3rd class. She commenced her last Rotterdam - New York voyage on 16/4/1929 and was scrapped the same year at Hendrik Ido Ambacht. Although the name was spelt as "Ryndam" by the builders, it should have been "Rijndam" and although this was never amended, it was spelt this way in large white letters on the ship's side during the Great War for identification purposes.

 

 

 

Here three images showing RIJNDAM. First, note the postcard. Obviously the name is touched into the postcard... not the real name. The second photo shows the ship in the early years of the first war.... large lettering on the side as RIJNDAM -Holland America. This was simply for identification purposes. The next one of USS RIJNDAM. Probably most people thought the spelling because of RIJNDAM was on the sides of the ship. When people say she was 'commissioned' as USS Rijndam.... the prefix is what they are talking... the prefix 'USS'.

341110695_Rijndam.jpgc..jpg.9b1fa2dd0ca1733a44e7fc6c476a8a99.jpg

1397688093_Rijndam-1915.jpgb.jpg.67c51e51834eff47331af5224c72a496.jpg

767532825_USSRIJNDAMa..jpg.89202e313f5c2cdf982563d5c9589d75.jpg

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In any event Ryndam is being transferred to P&O.

 

 

Ah... but in the next few years there will be a new Ryndam... and probably a new Statendam as well.

 

 

Might be a good chance to call the Koningsdam sistership is named

 

RIJNDAM

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Verzonden vanaf mijn iPad met behulp van Tapatalk

 

Surely you mean "myn" iPad :p

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A bit more...

 

 

Ryndam

The "Ryndam" was a 12,340 gross ton ship, built by Harland & Wolff, Belfast in 1901 for the Holland America Line. Her details were - length 550.3ft x beam 62.3ft, one funnel, two masts, twin screw and a speed of 15 knots. There was accommodation for 286-1st, 196-2nd and 1,800-3rd class passengers. Launched on 18/5/1901, she commenced her maiden voyage from Rotterdam to New York on 10/10/1901. On 18/1/1916 she was damaged by a mine in the North Sea, was repaired in Rotterdam and resumed the Rotterdam - New York service on 15/4/1916. On 21/3/1918 she was requisitioned by the US government for transport services, released in Oct.1919 and resumed the Rotterdam - New York service on 31/7/1920. In May 1925 she was refitted to carry cabin and 3rd class passengers, and in May 1926 altered to cabin, tourist and 3rd class. She commenced her last Rotterdam - New York voyage on 16/4/1929 and was scrapped the same year at Hendrik Ido Ambacht. Although the name was spelt as "Ryndam" by the builders, it should have been "Rijndam" and although this was never amended, it was spelt this way in large white letters on the ship's side during the Great War for identification purposes.

 

 

 

Here three images showing RIJNDAM. First, note the postcard. Obviously the name is touched into the postcard... not the real name. The second photo shows the ship in the early years of the first war.... large lettering on the side as RIJNDAM -Holland America. This was simply for identification purposes. The next one of USS RIJNDAM. Probably most people thought the spelling because of RIJNDAM was on the sides of the ship. When people say she was 'commissioned' as USS Rijndam.... the prefix is what they are talking... the prefix 'USS'.

 

OMG...Can you imagine (with horror) that little ship holding 1800 passengers in 3rd class? Total passenger capacity of 2282 is just slightly less than the Westerdam today! And people complain how crowded an inside cabin is for 2, much less 4...EM

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How about the British India S.S. Co. (P&O) s.s. RAJULA built 1927. Her passenger certificate was for..... 5,000 in Third Class! After the second war her certificate was lowered to just about 3,000.

Rajula_Madras_057_mod_SN.jpg.25cb9bf7c6a87f120a35fc57b331d5a0.jpg

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I was on the Old Westerdam in the '90s when the Rijndam was newly announced as sister ship to the Veendam and the Maasdam. It was being promoted with the original spelling. During that cruise there were multiple trivia questions (back when trivia was held in the Queens Lounge and there were horse races) passengers could not get the spelling or the pronunciation correct the entire week, no matter how often staff said it.

 

It was changed to the Ryndam because that is the phonetic pronunciation of Rijndam-at least that is the story I heard from the same cruise director the following year.

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I was on the Old Westerdam in the '90s when the Rijndam was newly announced as sister ship to the Veendam and the Maasdam. It was being promoted with the original spelling. During that cruise there were multiple trivia questions (back when trivia was held in the Queens Lounge and there were horse races) passengers could not get the spelling or the pronunciation correct the entire week, no matter how often staff said it.

 

It was changed to the Ryndam because that is the phonetic pronunciation of Rijndam-at least that is the story I heard from the same cruise director the following year.

 

 

I hate to say, it was just a myth. Of course it MIGHT have been the intended for the ship, but I assure you, when the ship came out of the shipyard at Belfast from Harland & Wolff the name on the bow and stern as RYNDAM.

 

Again, look at any Dutch books today... it will use the name RIJNDAM.... on the present RYNDAM. Try Google.... m.s. RYNDAM and m.s. RIJNDAM both in use.

 

Stephen

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I hate to say, it was just a myth. Of course it MIGHT have been the intended for the ship, but I assure you, when the ship came out of the shipyard at Belfast from Harland & Wolff the name on the bow and stern as RYNDAM.

 

Again, look at any Dutch books today... it will use the name RIJNDAM.... on the present RYNDAM. Try Google.... m.s. RYNDAM and m.s. RIJNDAM both in use.

 

Stephen

 

I made a mistake, it was 1992 when they announced it (Rijndam) and it was 1994 when I questioned the name change to Ryndam. Since the ship was built in 1994 I don't doubt that it left the shipyard as the Ryndam. It was christened as the Ryndam not the Rijndam. Two years prior to it being built was the time frame I was referencing.

I wish I had daily planners from then, I know it was in print as the Rijndam in one. I also don't think Brian Price, the CD, was known for his sense of humor.

Edited by bermuda triangle

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