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linderbelle

So confused about Hurtigruten

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We always book a cabin on a low deck and have always had 'private facilities'. We have never had to share!

 

Transfers and hotels are quite expensive if they are booked through Hurtigruten so we always book our own. Flybussen, for example, is pretty much half price as are flights.

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The only ship with shared bathrooms in some cabins is MS Lofoten. All other ships have private bathrooms for all cabins.

I agree with digitl about organizing your own transport and flights, so much cheaper. The only transfer that might be of interest if you have heavy luggage is from Bergen airport to the ship (there is good public transport in Bergen but they will leave you at a spot from which you need to walk about 5/10 minutes to the ferry terminal).

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I agree that as a general rule if you book flights on your own you do get a better price. However, do check out all options. We booked hurtigruten for early January and they gave us a much better price for the exact flights that I was looking at.

 

We chose to book the hotel and transfer with hurtigruten also even though their prices were a bit higher. My concern is that it might be considerably icy in January and my husband has difficulty walking even on good surfaces. We might get better service and help with luggage than if wing it on my own.........don't know.

 

The money we saved on the flight more than compensates for the higher cost for hotel and transfers.

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We booked hurtigruten for early January and they gave us a much better price for the exact flights that I was looking at.

 

Well done. That has to be a first!

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I agree that as a general rule if you book flights on your own you do get a better price. However, do check out all options. We booked hurtigruten for early January and they gave us a much better price for the exact flights that I was looking at.

 

We chose to book the hotel and transfer with hurtigruten also even though their prices were a bit higher. My concern is that it might be considerably icy in January and my husband has difficulty walking even on good surfaces. We might get better service and help with luggage than if wing it on my own.........don't know.

 

The money we saved on the flight more than compensates for the higher cost for hotel and transfers.

 

Booking the ship to airport transfer also saves you the problem of finding your own taxi or lugging your suitcases blocks to the Main Street to catch the airport bus. We usually fly home from Bergen early the morning after the ship arrives back, and stay at the Airport Clarion, located a few feet from where the transfer bus leaves air passengers. That way we don't have to worry if the ship is a few hours late or get from town to the airport very early in the morning.

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Well done. That has to be a first!

Indeed! For the price of the flight package to Bergen for one person, we bought flights, one hotel night in Olso and Oslo-Bergen train for two! ;)

It might also depend on where in the world you are coming from.

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I booked my own flights (Norwegian Air RT from LAX to Oslo) and train (RT Oslo to Bergen) on-line separate from my Hurtigruten booking. I also booked my own lodging (AirB&B in Oslo and Bergen, and one night in a hotel in Bergen). I did take the hotel to pier transport in Bergen, but it was expensive and I could have done it less expensively in a cab. I took a cab from near the pier (where my AirB&B stay was) to the train station in Bergen. In Oslo I stayed in an AirB&B near the train station, so just walked there from the train and back, and took the train to the airport.

 

I had an inside cabin on deck 4 on the MS Trollfjord, and yes, I had my own bathroom.

 

I traveled alone, and found many Norwegians to talk to (they study English from Kindergarden all the way through high school), as well as people from the UK, the USA, Canada, and Australia. There were also a lot of Germans on board...some spoke English and others did not. Most of the Swedes on board also spoke English.

Edited by Splinter

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Thank you to everyone for all this excellent information. I've been toying for several years with doing a voyage on Hurtigruten, and have decided that it should probably be my next one, because I'm not getting any younger. ;)

 

I watch "New Scandinavian Cooking" on PBS, and several episodes were shot on Hurtigruten ships, which gave a good feel for their size and ambience.

 

This would be my first cold-weather cruise, and I don't really have the wardrobe for it, certainly not the boots. Would one of those packable down coats with a sweater underneath be warm enough? I'd probably sail in the fall, and be solo.

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Your outer layer need to be waterproof and (very important) windproof, so whichever you choose, make sure it has both those qualities. In the fall you can have very different weather along the way (nice sunny days or rain, mild to cold temperatures, snow, wind...) so you need to have a flexible wardrobe and I think the best is to have an outer layer that is not too warm and several layers underneath you can adjust from day to day.

In the fall you don't really need boots as there should not be snow (when in the fall though?). A pair of good waterproof hiking shoes will be fine.

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Thank you for the good advice, Sarnia. I think a lot of the packable down coats are NOT waterproof. I won't buy until I find one that is. The descriptions never mention wind, though.

 

This is the time to shop for that kind of clothing, so I have my eyes glued to all the sales. :)

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I think a lot of the packable down coats are NOT waterproof.

That was my feeling as well (except maybe the very expensive ones?). You can look at hiking jackets, or maybe sailing jackets (that's what I use). A light down coat could be one of your layers for the cold days, with a light, waterproof/windproof jacket as the outer layer. Breathable is also nice.

 

I am giving advice based on my own experience of the journey, and I spend a lot of time on the outside decks, snow or shine, so if you do not plan to do that you can maybe be more relaxed in your clothing, as it is always easy to go inside if the weather do not suit you. Although it is nice to have proper clothing if you do outside excursions (and particularly North Cape, which can be very very windy and bitterly cold).

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I'm not typically the outdoor type, which is why I don't have all the gear already. And Virginia has a fairly temperate climate, so it's rare to need boots. I have some, but they are not too rugged.

 

On this cruise, I would want to be out on deck a lot, as well as walk around the places we visit.

 

I was looking in the LL Bean catalog and it does describe down coats as being good against wind, but just "water resistant," which doesn't mean waterproof.

 

They also run very small. I tried a few on in Macy's, and for a coat to cover my bust (with a light shirt underneath), the sleeves went down to my knees! :(

 

So I'm thinking a packable down coat will NOT be suitable for wearing layers if I to zip it up. I've never heard of hiking or sailing jackets, so I'll check those out next. This is quite an education.

 

Karen

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I'm not sure "hiking jacket" is the proper word, as I am not an English native speaker and I am translating from French ;)

The kind of jacket I'm thinking of would be something like that:

http://www.tribord.co.uk/offshoroa-womens-breathable-and-waterproof-sailing-jacket-dark-blue-id_8319498

Or those on this page for instance : http://www.switchbacktravel.com/best-rain-jackets (I don't know any of these models, it's just to illustrate my point), although they don't say much about windproofing.

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I'm a former Virginian and took for Norwegian coastal adventures, 1) thermal underware, 2)a turtleneck, 3)a down jacket and 4) a gore tex raincoat.....on really cold, windy days all 4 together worked well.

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I'm a former Virginian and took for Norwegian coastal adventures, 1) thermal underware, 2)a turtleneck, 3)a down jacket and 4) a gore tex raincoat.....on really cold, windy days all 4 together worked well.

 

Layers is most important. I had a light weight down, fleece jacket, water proof jacket, thermal underwear, sweater/t-shirt. Sometimes I wore all of them, but rarely. When it rained, I had the water proof jacket over my fleece or the down. My suggestion is, if you have to buy a jacket, try to make it something you will wear again at home.

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Try checking Eddiie Bauer website. I got the superior down stadium coat for a cruise in January. I also come as a parka but I thought the longer lenghty wold keep me warmer. We have had a very mild winter so far but I did wear it to walk the dog on a few evenings that got into the 30's and was surprised how toasty warm I was. I go got the petite large and the sleeves are perfect. (I usually wear 12 petite). It's waterproof, wind proof, and not too heavy. I'm planning to carry it on the plane.

 

O, and it is now 40% off with free shipping and returns. I am not outdoorsy either and I figure I can wear this after the cruise when it is cold.

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I'm a former Virginian and took for Norwegian coastal adventures, 1) thermal underware, 2)a turtleneck, 3)a down jacket and 4) a gore tex raincoat.....on really cold, windy days all 4 together worked well.

 

Eek! :eek: Thermal underwear. I've never owned any, but it would definitely be handy on this trip.

 

Try checking Eddiie Bauer website. I got the superior down stadium coat for a cruise in January. I also come as a parka but I thought the longer lenghty wold keep me warmer. We have had a very mild winter so far but I did wear it to walk the dog on a few evenings that got into the 30's and was surprised how toasty warm I was. I go got the petite large and the sleeves are perfect. (I usually wear 12 petite). It's waterproof, wind proof, and not too heavy. I'm planning to carry it on the plane.

 

O, and it is now 40% off with free shipping and returns. I am not outdoorsy either and I figure I can wear this after the cruise when it is cold.

 

Haven't checked Eddie Bauer, so thanks for the tip. Petite large is probably what I would need as well, and it sounds like what I would need. I would also like stadium length to keep my tush warm. :)

 

Karen

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REI is another good place (either store or on-line) for winter gear, including boots and thermals. WinterSilks is also good for silk long underwear.

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We were on the round-trip Coastal cruise in late October/early November. For the very coldest day to North Cape (and the wind there was brutal but you're not outside all the time either) I wore a thin silk turtleneck (Winter Silks) underlayer on top and a thin merino wool bottom underlayer (from Costco .com). They were easy to fit under my usual travel pants and thin knit crew neck top.

 

I used a fleece vest and a thin (t-shirt weight) long sleeved hooded shirt. Topped all with a waterproof/windproof hooded rainjacket that was long enough to cover my hips. I had a thin wool knit cap and a gauzy scarf plus gloves.

 

For shoes I had thinsulate Propet brand booties with a slightly knobby sole. It all worked very well and packed great. m--

Edited by RMLincoln

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I have both the Eddie Bauer premium down parka and the ll bean Baxter state jacket. I live in Michigan, and am very pleased with the warmth of both. Debating which one I will take. The Eddie Bauer is softer and lighter, though just as warm. Also a bit longer. Both cover your Fanny. The llbean a wee bit more protection from wind and rain.

 

 

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Just picked up some Patagonia capilene base layer tops and bottoms. These are AMAZING! They are so thin you think that they can't possibly be warm, but when you put them on its like heaven. Today I worm them under legging and a velour hoody in 20 degree weather. I was toasty warm. I highly recommend you pick some up. I got mine online at REI. They aren't cheap, but I think I'll get plenty of wear out of them. I'm lounging in them right now!

 

 

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We took the 12 day Norwegian coastal trip from January 4 to 15 on Trollfjord and it was fantastic. I only did two excursions, dog sledding and the fishing village walk (I think that's what it was called.) I also got off the ship and walked in most of the stops that were a half an hour or more.

 

My Eddie Bauer down stadium coat, Ugg hiking boots with wool blend socks, and Target fleece lined mittens kept me toasty warm. Some people said their fingers and toes were cold dog sledding but I was fine. My face did get cold but I just pulled my scarf up. I also wore a knit hat under my hood but only when dog sledding.

 

I loved checking out the cultural differences as I walked the towns. Everyone was very friendly. We returned home to temps in the 20's and everyone is complaining about the frigid weather. In northern Norway young women walked their babies tucked in carriages in single digit temps. It's all what you're used to.

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We took the 12 day Norwegian coastal trip from January 4 to 15 on Trollfjord and it was fantastic. I only did two excursions, dog sledding and the fishing village walk (I think that's what it was called.) I also got off the ship and walked in most of the stops that were a half an hour or more.

 

 

 

My Eddie Bauer down stadium coat, Ugg hiking boots with wool blend socks, and Target fleece lined mittens kept me toasty warm. Some people said their fingers and toes were cold dog sledding but I was fine. My face did get cold but I just pulled my scarf up. I also wore a knit hat under my hood but only when dog sledding.

 

 

 

I loved checking out the cultural differences as I walked the towns. Everyone was very friendly. We returned home to temps in the 20's and everyone is complaining about the frigid weather. In northern Norway young women walked their babies tucked in carriages in single digit temps. It's all what you're used to.

 

 

Just how cold did it get? Did you go out on deck much in the evening?

When you went dog sledding, did you wear your own outerwear, or was it provided to you?

Thanks

 

 

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Once we got above the Arctic Circle it was probably in the single digits but it really did not feel horrible especially if you protected yourself from the wind. We did not go out on deck that much but a lot of people did. They had several activities on deck during the cruise: crossing the circl ceremony, salmon filleting, others that I don't remember right now. I walked around the towns when the stops allowed and it was cold but really not that bad. I think it was about 7 degrees the afternoon we went dog sledding.

 

I had my down coat, warm boots, mittens, hat for dog sledding then you go into a little cabin and they give you a jumpsuit to put on over your own things. Like I said, the only cold I felt was on my face so be sure to wear a scarf that you can pull up. Several of the others said their fingers and toes were cold. I kept my cell phone in my mitten to keep it warm but also ready to take some pictures. I did the excursion in Kerkines and we were on the sleds only for about a half hour. We then went into another cabin to get warm and have a warm drink. After that we were able to roam around the ice hotel and then feed the reindeer.

 

Dog sledding was great and I may have done it again if it had been offered. Seems the excursion prices were less onboard probably due to the advantageous exchange rate. We had a great musher, a young woman in her twenties, and she answered all our questions about the dogs, how they are trained, and a little about herself.

 

Let me know if you have other questions and I will answer as best I can.

 

Carol

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Great info Carol! Meant to respond and thank you sooner, but I see I didn't send my reply. It was still sitting here... Lol. My dogs sledding is in Tromso. I don't see the Kirkenes offered so it may be sold out. Two weeks to go for me! Can't wait!

 

 

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