Jump to content
Cruise Critic Community
czech

holland america formal nights

Recommended Posts

3 hours ago, KroozNut said:

 

How dare you!!  :classic_ohmy:

ROTFLMAO that is funny 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, terrydtx said:

image.thumb.png.48ab7f4285f5c8898dbd0a93dac6b2ae.png

I wonder if this will meet the HAL standards for formal wear? LOL

The carnation is a nice touch 🤣

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
7 hours ago, terrydtx said:

image.thumb.png.48ab7f4285f5c8898dbd0a93dac6b2ae.png

I wonder if this will meet the HAL standards for formal wear? LOL

The company that sells this shirt also has a version with a collar on the shirt, which probably comes closer to HAL's dress code for the MDR. They also have a long sleeve one for the colder Alaska Cruises. 

Edited by terrydtx

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 1/2/2019 at 1:47 PM, MauiWowie57 said:

As has been noted, people used to dress up for airplane flights.

 

Some of us once danced The Hustle; that doesn't mean that that dance is some kind of paragon.

 

People used to do a lot of thing that society now generally realizes were superfluous or otherwise a relic to be left behind. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 1/2/2019 at 1:47 PM, MauiWowie57 said:

I think there's a core group of HALsters that like the remaining wisps of elegance.

 

Very true; there is a rapidly shrinking group of customers like that. The question boils down to when they can expect to have to switch to a non-mass-market (read: more expensive) cruise line that serves their niche interests. It wasn't ten years ago. It may not have even been five years ago. It does seem now, though, that that time has been reached. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 1/2/2019 at 2:42 PM, blizzardboy said:

I don't look down on them. I was taught to lead by example. I was also taught that some will refuse to be be led, so don't let it ruin your day.

 

I don't think you realize it, but you contradicted yourself within the space of two sentences.

 

And that's really why threads like this get so heated: The people trying to defend their promotion of contexts for formal attire are apparently so desperate to do so that in the process they fail to realize how their advocacy is a baseless, and somewhat petty, insult. 

 

You're not "leading by example", blizzardboy. If anything, you're actually trailing by example. And there is nothing wrong with that; just as long as you don't consider it "leading". 

 

But the tail end of your contradiction is also worth highlighting: Some folks who are "trailing by example" will refuse to recognize that that is the reality, and will be unable to see their choice as no better than the other choice that other people make.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

 

On 1/3/2019 at 2:02 AM, akav8er said:

We cruise HAL because it's a more traditional cruise line

 

Not anymore. It's a mid-grade, mass-market cruise line. That's rather the point. "Traditional" cruising is a niche interest, now, just like expedition cruising, with the difference that expedition cruise is becoming more mainstream while traditional cruising is becoming less mainstream. Regardless, just as those who wanted expedition cruising had to choose boutique cruise lines for that in the past, those who want traditional cruising will now have to do so.

 

On 1/3/2019 at 2:43 AM, akav8er said:

In your opinion

 

No, that's not an opinion. It's a statement of fact for which there is overwhelming evidence here on Cruise Critic alone. Formal attire is increasingly viewed as fussy, not a sign of respect. I'm not talking about how I view formal attire; I'm talking about how it is increasingly viewed by society in general. If you don't see that as a statement of fact that there really isn't much I can do to help you understand the situation within which you find yourself.

 

On 1/3/2019 at 12:28 PM, slidergirl said:

If you are turned off by people dining in the MDR in clothing deemed fine by HAL, you can dine in your room in your finery.  Or, you can turn to Cunard and it's class-defining dining rooms or Crystal.

 

And that's the crux of the issue, I think: Those with this niche interest in traditional cruising don't want to have to pay the premium necessary to cruise a boutique cruise line that serves their niche interest (and in the process lose the frequent cruise benefits that they relish). They want to go back to a time when most everyone agreed with their personal preferences and they weren't increasingly the odd person out, as is the case today. 

Edited by bUU

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 1/2/2019 at 12:47 PM, MauiWowie57 said:

 

- I'm sorry if some posters equate dressing nicely for appropriate occasions as a subtle form of class warfare. Really? Surely you're kidding me. Is dressing neatly (and, btw, my tux is the least expensive suit I own. They aren't expensive.) and demonstrating manners and appreciation for fine table service showing off status? Please. Let's stop this sillyness right now. 

Suggest  you google 'clothing and social status'.  

 

When you wear a 'senior military officer', did you not wear rank insignia to distinguish your superior rank?  How about the 'fruit salad' on your chest?  Was that a way to distinguish yourself, to express your social status?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
26 minutes ago, RocketMan275 said:

Suggest  you google 'clothing and social status'.  

 

When you wear a 'senior military officer', did you not wear rank insignia to distinguish your superior rank?  How about the 'fruit salad' on your chest?  Was that a way to distinguish yourself, to express your social status?

I have to stop participating in this thread as it's out of hand.

As has been pointed out, there are some people that enjoy dressing for a special occasion on cruise, and some that prefer not to. At this point, again, as has been pointed out, HAL will follow its market, and if the majority of its loyal clientele want a more relaxed dress code, HAL will go that way. 

 

For the convenience of our fellow readers, I did google as suggested:

 

https://www.encyclopedia.com/fashion/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/social-class-and-clothing

---

To answer your question, assuming you're actually curious, wearing medals as prescribed on uniforms isn't a means of expressing "social status."  It's serves to exemplify the actions and accomplishments of the wearer. Whether that Medal of Honor winner is a non-high school graduate junior enlisted service person or a four star general, whether or not they come from a wealthy family or somewhat more modest origins, their wearing of that (or any other medal) is a visual testament awarded by the President (or Congress or other authority depending on the Medal) that they did something significant. 

Edited by MauiWowie57

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What we have here is a failure to communicate.  Let's all take a deep breath and make an attempt to use our manners.  There is a tendency to lower our standards when we communicate on social media.  Folks hide behind the screen and say things to others that they would never say directly to their faces.  This is not helping our society.  Can we agree to just follow the HAL clothing guidelines?   OK?  All together now....

Lyrics

Kumbaya, my Lord, Kumbaya,
Kumbaya, my Lord, Kumbaya,
Kumbaya, my Lord, Kumbaya, oh, Lord, Kumbaya.
Someone's singing, Lord, Kumbaya,


Now, don't you feel better?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 1/1/2019 at 3:32 PM, akav8er said:

 

On 12/31/2018 at 8:43 PM, akav8er said:

 

I've never quite understood the argument for not 'dressing up' for formal/gala nights because someone was flying to the embarkation point. ..... Folks are just not interested in putting forth the effort and 'Oh, I'm flying' is a convenient excuse.  Their choice, of course, but it seems like if one were that casual and disinterested in the customs of the ship or line they would opt for a Bubba Gump cruise rather than a traditional line like HAL. That said, HAL is a willing participant as more passengers equals more revenue even it diminishes the brand in the eyes of the more traditional among us. 

 

On 1/1/2019 at 3:27 PM, akav8er said:

You misunderstood my comment.  I was lamenting the loss of effort.  It's a show of respect to dress for the occasion. .... To borrow phrase, "if you want a -less- formal environment, then there are other cruise lines to choose from."   😉

 

On 1/3/2019 at 2:59 AM, akav8er said:

Slovenly? No, not at all. Lazy? Perhaps, yes.

 

That said, HAL is a willing participant as more passengers equals more revenue even it diminishes the brand in the eyes of the more traditional among us. HAL continuing to relax standards is turning the line into just another Carnival cruise similar to what Sears did when they incorporated Kmart into their stores. It tuned off some of its traditional clientele. 

 😉

 

These sorts of expressions are the type of thing that always has me rethinking whether HAL is the right line for me.

 

While you make an effort to pass off your thoughts as even-handed and considered, your verbal pokes and jabs (a few of which are included above) make it obvious that any who agree with HAL's relaxation of the dress code (together with virtually ever other mass market cruise line) are to be lamented for not showing proper respect; are "lazy" and not interested in putting forth an effort; and ought to opt for a "Bubba Gump" cruise.  Wow.

 

I have been cruising for more than 40 years, having started at a young age. I remember well the era of formal nights, informal nights (men must wear a jacket) and the very occasional casual night on mass market ships ranging from Sitmar (and later Princess) to Royal Viking to Holland America. But those were different times, and I don't regret their passing. Dining in the evening was a longer, more drawn-out affair with more courses and a much higher level of individualized service.  Things are different now for many reasons.  Gone are the days of having to pack a separate suitcase just for all my purses and shoes, thank goodness.

 

I dress to the code of whatever ship I sail on. In fact, I dress above code for most. However, I do not prefer to wear formal clothing when I cruise or travel -- not because I am 'lazy' but because it is not required and, in the scheme of things, dressing for dinner is not high on my priority list. I regard it as a bit of a chore.  It is only one tiny facet of my cruise experience.  If you knew how many hours I spend researching every single port I visit on a cruise, reading guide books and related materials, creating detailed step-by-step plans and documents for each site, vetting private guides -- not to mention detailed planning regarding what clothing and shoes are best suited for ALL my activities -- well, you'd be hard pressed to consider me "lazy". 

 

Do not misunderstand me. I certainly feel passengers should respect the cruise line's guidelines for dress. But those who fail to exceed those guidelines should not ever be looked down upon or considered lazy, and they certainly should not cause a lament about the perceived loss in standards. I am neither a snob nor a reverse snob. I'm not one of those who makes false syllogisms like "I have had much more interesting conversations with the family wearing stinky overalls than with the couple in a tux or ballgown."  Wearing a tuxedo doesn't make you less interesting, but it also doesn't make you more interesting.

 

Finally, I'd suggest (with all due respect) that your assertion that all mass market lines visit the same ports is false.  Some of us are of the opinion that HAL's most singular difference from other mass market lines is not its "traditional" experience -- whatever that means -- but its varied and interesting itineraries. 

 

 

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
30 minutes ago, MauiWowie57 said:

To answer your question, assuming you're actually curious, wearing medals as prescribed on uniforms isn't a means of expressing "social status."  It's serves to exemplify the actions and accomplishments of the wearer. Whether that Medal of Honor winner is a non-high school graduate junior enlisted service person or a four star general, whether or not they come from a wealthy family or somewhat more modest origins, their wearing of that (or any other medal) is a visual testament awarded by the President (or Congress or other authority depending on the Medal) that they did something significant. 

All medals and awards are awarded for doing something "significant'.  

The normal customs and courtesies of the service say that a MOH recipient is entitled to receiving a salute from a General Officer.  I think most would think that sounds like a measure of social status.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 7/13/2017 at 1:54 AM, czech said:

Hi,can anyone please tell me the formal night dress code on the westedam,we are travelling on her in febuary next year,we have only cruised on English ships previously and I was wandering can I wear a suite or do I need my tuxedo,thankyou

Sadly, society has changed.  There was a time when people dressed to even go to the grocery store.  Department stores used to have tux and gowns for sale and that is gone.  Even formal china patterns for wedding registries are not the same.  People just don't entertain that way anymore.  Growing up in Houston I was brought up that even at 95F and 98% humidity you wore a full on suit and tie to church.  Now as long as you are street legal people seem to go to church that way.  True, airline luggage polices means that you no longer have a "formal suitcase"  This shift in society also applies to cruise travel.  More and more cruise lines, even upscale, or getting more relaxed.  The official word on HAL's website is:

"

A: Yes, some refinements were made to improve consistency and the policy now reads:

  • Most evenings smart casual attire is appropriate. Shorts, pool/beachwear, distressed jeans and men’s tank tops are best left to the daytime and are not permitted in fine dining restaurants.
  • Gala Nights evoke the grand traditions of cruising as guests dress to impress for special events on board, including our five-course gourmet dinner in the Dining Room. For gentlemen, collared shirts and slacks are required in all fine dining restaurants.

 

Q: Why the change from “Formal” To “Gala” night?

A: To many, the “Formal” term was misleading as it implies a specific type of dress (black tie or tuxedo) that has never been a requirement. “Gala” still implies festive or dressy without misleading guests to bring attire the majority of guests don’t wear.

Q: What about ladies’ gala attire?

A: Dressy attire is appropriate. Dresses, skirts, and slacks are all acceptable.

Q: Are a jacket and tie required for men?

A: Jacket and tie is the preferred attire in all fine dining restaurants on Gala Nights, though it is not required. Guests without a jacket and tie were allowed in the fine dining restaurants before the new wording so this is not a policy change.

Q: Are jeans allowed?

A: Jeans without holes, tears or embroidery are welcome on most evenings in all restaurants, but on Gala Nights jeans are only allowed in the casual dining restaurants.

Q: Can I wear shorts in the main dining room?

A: Not at dinner. The dining room is considered a fine dining restaurant and shorts are not permitted.

Q: Is the dress code the same on Grand Voyages?

A: Yes. The policy applies to all Holland America Line voyages."

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 minutes ago, cruisemom42 said:

Do not misunderstand me. I certainly feel passengers should respect the cruise line's guidelines for dress. But those who fail to exceed those guidelines should not ever be looked down upon or considered lazy, and they certainly should not cause a lament about the perceived loss in standards. I am neither a snob nor a reverse snob. I'm not one of those who makes false syllogisms like "I have had much more interesting conversations with the family wearing stinky overalls than with the couple in a tux or ballgown."  Wearing a tuxedo doesn't make you less interesting, but it also doesn't make you more interesting.

 

Agree 100% cruisemom.  As long as all passengers are following the dress code stipulated then all is good 😉. If one wishes to exceed it as we often do, then that’s fine.  But there is no need to ‘look down’ or discount others because they have chosen not to.

 

I think most passengers take the attitude we do so you would be just fine on a HAL ship IMO 🙂 

 

8 minutes ago, cruisemom42 said:

 

Finally, I'd suggest (with all due respect) that your assertion that all mass market lines visit the same ports is false.  Some of us are of the opinion that HAL's most singular difference from other mass market lines is not its "traditional" experience -- whatever that means -- but its varied and interesting itineraries. 

 

Again I agree 100%. It would be interesting to see the person who asserted this to try to find any ship doing the itinerary we are this April on the Prinsendam.  Certainly no other mass market line offers it.

 

Taking the Caribbean out of the equation - one thing that HAL shines at is it’s itineraries 😄 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 minutes ago, cruisemom42 said:

 

While you make an effort to pass off your thoughts as even-handed and considered, your verbal pokes and jabs (a few of which are included above) make it obvious that any who agree with HAL's relaxation of the dress code (together with virtually ever other mass market cruise line) are to be lamented for not showing proper respect; are "lazy" and not interested in putting forth an effort; and ought to opt for a "Bubba Gump" cruise.  Wow.

I'm being disrespectful if I don't dress to their preferences but it isn't disrespectful if they don't dress to my preferences?     

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
20 minutes ago, cruisemom42 said:

 

These sorts of expressions are the type of thing that always has me rethinking whether HAL is the right line for me.

 

While you make an effort to pass off your thoughts as even-handed and considered, your verbal pokes and jabs (a few of which are included above) make it obvious that any who agree with HAL's relaxation of the dress code (together with virtually ever other mass market cruise line) are to be lamented for not showing proper respect; are "lazy" and not interested in putting forth an effort; and ought to opt for a "Bubba Gump" cruise.  Wow.

 

I have been cruising for more than 40 years, having started at a young age. I remember well the era of formal nights, informal nights (men must wear a jacket) and the very occasional casual night on mass market ships ranging from Sitmar (and later Princess) to Royal Viking to Holland America. But those were different times, and I don't regret their passing. Dining in the evening was a longer, more drawn-out affair with more courses and a much higher level of individualized service.  Things are different now for many reasons.  Gone are the days of having to pack a separate suitcase just for all my purses and shoes, thank goodness.

 

I dress to the code of whatever ship I sail on. In fact, I dress above code for most. However, I do not prefer to wear formal clothing when I cruise or travel -- not because I am 'lazy' but because it is not required and, in the scheme of things, dressing for dinner is not high on my priority list. I regard it as a bit of a chore.  It is only one tiny facet of my cruise experience.  If you knew how many hours I spend researching every single port I visit on a cruise, reading guide books and related materials, creating detailed step-by-step plans and documents for each site, vetting private guides -- not to mention detailed planning regarding what clothing and shoes are best suited for ALL my activities -- well, you'd be hard pressed to consider me "lazy". 

 

Do not misunderstand me. I certainly feel passengers should respect the cruise line's guidelines for dress. But those who fail to exceed those guidelines should not ever be looked down upon or considered lazy, and they certainly should not cause a lament about the perceived loss in standards. I am neither a snob nor a reverse snob. I'm not one of those who makes false syllogisms like "I have had much more interesting conversations with the family wearing stinky overalls than with the couple in a tux or ballgown."  Wearing a tuxedo doesn't make you less interesting, but it also doesn't make you more interesting.

 

Finally, I'd suggest (with all due respect) that your assertion that all mass market lines visit the same ports is false.  Some of us are of the opinion that HAL's most singular difference from other mass market lines is not its "traditional" experience -- whatever that means -- but its varied and interesting itineraries. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(bold is mine) I love formal nights and dressing up. That's one of the things I love about Cunard. For Cunard, I take the "posh frocks." So does everyone else. And for those who say ambiance isn't important to them, well it is to me, and I really enjoy it.

 

But formal nights on HAL are gone. LIke it or not, that's how it is. Do I wish everyone would dress to the nines for dinner? Yes, I do. But that isn't how it is on HAL. Hasn't been for quite a while, really, because "formal night" wasn't enforced. So HAL has gone to a less formal dress code, and I dress to meet that, or maybe a bit "above." But the evening gowns stay home.

 

Bottom line for me is their ship, their rules. And the text I bolded above states exactly how I feel. So well said!

 

The only complaint I have about HAL's dress code is the "gala night" nonsense. "Dress to impress" is silly when you read the description of the "gala night" minimum. Sorry, I'm not "impressed" by chinos and a golf shirt. HAL should stop pretending to have some kind of formal night, because they don't. 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, cruisemom42 said:

 

These sorts of expressions are the type of thing that always has me rethinking whether HAL is the right line for me.

 

While you make an effort to pass off your thoughts as even-handed and considered, your verbal pokes and jabs (a few of which are included above) make it obvious that any who agree with HAL's relaxation of the dress code (together with virtually ever other mass market cruise line) are to be lamented for not showing proper respect; are "lazy" and not interested in putting forth an effort; and ought to opt for a "Bubba Gump" cruise.  Wow.

 

I have been cruising for more than 40 years, having started at a young age. I remember well the era of formal nights, informal nights (men must wear a jacket) and the very occasional casual night on mass market ships ranging from Sitmar (and later Princess) to Royal Viking to Holland America. But those were different times, and I don't regret their passing. Dining in the evening was a longer, more drawn-out affair with more courses and a much higher level of individualized service.  Things are different now for many reasons.  Gone are the days of having to pack a separate suitcase just for all my purses and shoes, thank goodness.

 

I dress to the code of whatever ship I sail on. In fact, I dress above code for most. However, I do not prefer to wear formal clothing when I cruise or travel -- not because I am 'lazy' but because it is not required and, in the scheme of things, dressing for dinner is not high on my priority list. I regard it as a bit of a chore.  It is only one tiny facet of my cruise experience.  If you knew how many hours I spend researching every single port I visit on a cruise, reading guide books and related materials, creating detailed step-by-step plans and documents for each site, vetting private guides -- not to mention detailed planning regarding what clothing and shoes are best suited for ALL my activities -- well, you'd be hard pressed to consider me "lazy". 

 

Do not misunderstand me. I certainly feel passengers should respect the cruise line's guidelines for dress. But those who fail to exceed those guidelines should not ever be looked down upon or considered lazy, and they certainly should not cause a lament about the perceived loss in standards. I am neither a snob nor a reverse snob. I'm not one of those who makes false syllogisms like "I have had much more interesting conversations with the family wearing stinky overalls than with the couple in a tux or ballgown."  Wearing a tuxedo doesn't make you less interesting, but it also doesn't make you more interesting.

 

Finally, I'd suggest (with all due respect) that your assertion that all mass market lines visit the same ports is false.  Some of us are of the opinion that HAL's most singular difference from other mass market lines is not its "traditional" experience -- whatever that means -- but its varied and interesting itineraries. 

 

 

 

 

 

Yes, yes, yes!   I missed your rational, intelligent, and truthful missives while I was gone.   

I am tired of being called lazy, slovenly, not making an effort, being disrespectful, why don't I go to Carnival...  etc.  Some will say they aren't addressing those of us who meet the guidelines, but do not "exceed", but they end up lumping us in the "bad" group...

 

I am like you (besides our love for Sherpani 😉 ) - it is the destination that I go for.  I do not cruise for the food or the MDR or the "atmosphere."  If a cruise ship has the itinerary I want, I will choose it, regardless of the line. I'll be first off the ship at a port, the last one back on the ship, as I want to spend as much time as possible exploring the locations.   I always have my LBTD (Little Black Travel Dress) rolled up in my bag, at the ready for when times call for me to have to go to dinner where there is a dress suggestion.  I've said if that dress is good enough for dinner at a Michelin-starred restaurant, it's good enough for mediocre food in a mass-market MDR!  

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 12/30/2018 at 2:06 AM, Despegue said:

Look, just disregard my post. My point has not come over as intended and I certainly do not wish to offend anybody ( so easily done by me it seems). 

You, sir, are a throwback to a bygone age. If hats were still in fashion, I would doff mine in your honor.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I remember 15 years ago on CC the very long and argumentative attitudes in CC posts similar to this one, but they were about whether anyone should wear jeans for an evening in the MDR. I remember people being called Hillbillys for just suggesting they would wear jeans to the MDR.Some of the same arguments in this thread both pro and con were made about jeans, but look now 15 years later jeans are now allowed in the MDR except on so called Gala nights. My point is that the rules and guidelines are continuing to morph to the times and lifestyles of the present day.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
51 minutes ago, terrydtx said:

I remember 15 years ago on CC the very long and argumentative attitudes in CC posts similar to this one, but they were about whether anyone should wear jeans for an evening in the MDR. I remember people being called Hillbillys for just suggesting they would wear jeans to the MDR.Some of the same arguments in this thread both pro and con were made about jeans, but look now 15 years later jeans are now allowed in the MDR except on so called Gala nights. My point is that the rules and guidelines are continuing to morph to the times and lifestyles of the present day.

 

And some will have to be dragged, kicking and screaming, out of the 50s-90s and into the present day.   This is like the carryon vs checked bags "discussion".  "you aren't clean" or "boring clothes" or "it's an excuse to not bring formal wear" being lumped on carryon people.  "do you really need 3 outfits a day", "do you really need 20 pair of shoes for a 7 day cruise", etc for checked bag people.  I get it both ways, as I am also a carryon person (I will only take what I can manage myself on all modes of transport) and a non-formal gown wearer...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Bottom line is that some people have difficulty accepting change.

 

Others find it difficult to understand why what they do, how they dress, how they pack, and even where and what they eat is not the standard for the world or the yardstick by which others should be judged.

 

It has always been so.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, kazu said:

 

I think most passengers take the attitude we do so you would be just fine on a HAL ship IMO 🙂 

 

Again I agree 100%. It would be interesting to see the person who asserted this to try to find any ship doing the itinerary we are this April on the Prinsendam.  Certainly no other mass market line offers it.

 

 

 

I know you're right. It's just occasionally when this sort of thing comes up.... gives me a wee moment of doubt.

 

Still sorry not to do that Prinsendam itinerary because 1) Prinsendam  2)  great ports and 3) would like to have met in person!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, slidergirl said:

 

And some will have to be dragged, kicking and screaming, out of the 50s-90s and into the present day.   This is like the carryon vs checked bags "discussion".  "you aren't clean" or "boring clothes" or "it's an excuse to not bring formal wear" being lumped on carryon people.  "do you really need 3 outfits a day", "do you really need 20 pair of shoes for a 7 day cruise", etc for checked bag people.  I get it both ways, as I am also a carryon person (I will only take what I can manage myself on all modes of transport) and a non-formal gown wearer...

I remember reading an article about how a first class female passenger on Titanic was expected to wear a different outfit for breakfast, another for the morning promenade, another for lunch, another for the afternoon tea, another for the afternoon promenade, and still another for the evening meal.  Then there was a picture of a woman using the exercise bike.  Full skirt and a hat.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
21 minutes ago, cruisemom42 said:

 

I know you're right. It's just occasionally when this sort of thing comes up.... gives me a wee moment of doubt.

 

Still sorry not to do that Prinsendam itinerary because 1) Prinsendam  2)  great ports and 3) would like to have met in person!

 

Thanks 🙂. I too am sorry that we won’t meet in person.

 

It is a nice itinerary, but I, being the silly person I am will most likely be doing a LIVE thread.  I know I won’t get to everything you wanted to, but I will be getting to some.  I will try to do lots of pics so feel free to follow along if you’re not cruising.

 

Thanks again for wonderful info on Tarragona 🙂 and your other insightful observations on ports on the roll call.  Best to you on all of your travels 😄 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Forum Jump
    • Categories
      • 2019 Cruisers' Choice Awards
      • NCL Sail-Away Giveaway Sweepstakes - Win a 7-Day Cruise on Norwegian Joy!
      • Forum Assistance
      • New Cruisers
      • Community Contests
      • Cruise Lines “A – O”
      • Cruise Lines “P – Z”
      • River Cruising
      • ROLL CALLS
      • Digital Photography & Cruise Technology
      • Member Cruise Reviews
      • Special Interest Cruising
      • Cruise Discussion Topics
      • UK Cruising
      • Australia & New Zealand Cruisers
      • North American Homeports
      • Ports of Call
      • Cruise Conversations
×
×
  • Create New...