Jump to content
soraya

Opinions on new ship design - Greg Mortimer. Would you book this?

Recommended Posts

I've been looking for a well priced cruise since we went to the Antarctic in 2009 with Silversea when we got a great 2 for 1 offer as it was their 1st season in Antarctica. Just seen another great deal BUT the ship is a really radical new design and a really odd shape.

 

Looking for some opinions - has anyone seen/booked it?

 

https://www.auroraexpeditions.com.au/ship/greg-mortimer

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The theory is that the X-Bow should lead to a more stable and smooth crossing for the Drake. However, there is some skepticism about the lack of bow viewing space. I've se n that there are hydraulic platforms that can be lowered on the sides of the bow, but I would expect them to get crowded during big moments.

 

I'm curious to start hearing some reports once she enters service. I would think that people who've never been might not miss the bow space quite as much as the dedicated bow bunnies.

 

Having been on a ship where the very front of the bow was closed off for operations, most of the time I didn't actually miss it (though there were a few moments when I was frustrated). But since I was back to full bow access on my last expedition, it really reminded me how much I loved it, and I was among the few who spent hours out there every day.

 

So personally, since I don't usually have seasickness issues, I would probably choose a different ship with better bow access, if I could find something else for the same ship size and price range. If I couldn't find an alternative, I would go for it and see what it's like! However, I would be nervous to book early in the first season in case of delays on delivery.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I can't imagine not being able to get out on the bow. Some of our best times were there: going through the Lemaire Channel, watching a few Orcas teaching their young how to hunt seals, having a group photo and champaign celebration after crossing the Antarctic Circle, etc.

 

Those fancy viewing platforms are tiny.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I believe I saw renderings of the ships of the new Virgin Cruise Line that Richard Branson is trying to start have that same type of odd bow on them. It will be interesting to see how these vessels perform.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks everyone - at 9000USD pp for an Antarctic circle crossing, it was v tempting! But, I'd like it to be delivered and trialed first! The bow isn't a deal breaker, but the technology being new in such an inhospitable place does bother me.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I haven’t been yet so don’t know about the bow part, but I’d be tempted for the daily snorkeling alone!

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For what it's worth, the X-bow technology isn't really all that new. The first ship to use it went into service in 2006, and since then it has been used in over 50 ships in various industries. They're actually becoming somewhat common in the North Sea.

 

I would be slightly worried about a new ship, simply because of the risk of delayed delivery or general teething issues, but the technology itself doesn't give me pause at all as it has been fairly well tested here in the northern regions.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I went to the launch the other week that Greg himself attended.

 

It's not a vessel I would personally choose. Aside from the lack of bow there is also a huge lack of decent deck space. It's been designed for balcony cruisers who don't want to leave their luxury cabins.

 

Also agree with Kaisatsu. I would never pay a deposit on something still under construction. That goes for ships, apartment buildings - anything !

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using Forums

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I suspect it's yet another example of 'form-over-function'. The designer thinks it looks smart, but it doesn't really work for the consumer.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sooo, after one of those conversations with my spouse about novel design, wanting them tried and tested etc.

 

I drove past Aberden Harbour and there were 3 ships in port with this bow design. I couldn't believe it. In fact, there are quite a few here and they seem to have been adopted by the oil and gas industry as being much more stable in bad seas.

 

I understand that Lindblad have ordered one too.

I'l still wait a bit and see how the first passenger vessel does though.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Unfortunately being "used by the oil and gas industry" - doesn't equate to "being used by expedition travellers wanting a great view from the bow or any other deck"

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using Forums

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I suspect it's yet another example of 'form-over-function'. The designer thinks it looks smart, but it doesn't really work for the consumer.

 

This is not so much a "form over function" decision, but a decision on what function to emphasize. The owners, engineers and architects of this ship obviously made a decision that the "function" they wanted to emphasize was stability in rough seas. Read a little from a shipbuilder's perspective:

 

'While a traditional bow vessel rises on the waves and then drops violently onto the surface of the water, an X-BOW vessel, less subject to the vertical motions induced by the waves, continues on course more smoothly, while maintaining its speed. And because it uses less fuel to get through the waves, it also helps to save energy'

 

https://ulstein.com/innovations/x-bow

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We booked a 10 day cruise in Svalbard for June 2020 so it goes without saying that the ship design doesn't concern us. The zodiac loading setup on the Mortimer seems to be well thought out & efficient. In theory, that should mean more time away from the ship and closer to the sites / wildlife.

 

Also, the price for Svalbard was about 40% of what we paid for a Silver Cloud Expedition cruise to Antartica earlier this year for the same class cabin and length of cruise. Granted, there is and should be a price difference between four & five star service levels .... but still, it's significant .... and eating six course meals every night was never the motivator for an expedition cruise.

 

Of course we are hoping the previously expressed concerns about the ship delivery don't materialize.

 

Hope to have the good fortune to see some of you on board.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Forum Jump
    • Categories
      • Explore the Night. Sweepstakes - Enter now for a chance to win win a free cruise for two with Azamara Club Cruises!
      • Forum Assistance
      • New Cruisers
      • Cruise Lines “A – O”
      • Cruise Lines “P – Z”
      • River Cruising
      • ROLL CALLS
      • Digital Photography & Cruise Technology
      • Member Cruise Reviews
      • Community Contests
      • Special Interest Cruising
      • Cruise Discussion Topics
      • UK Cruising
      • Australia & New Zealand Cruisers
      • North American Homeports
      • Ports of Call
      • Cruise Conversations
×