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Kazzygirl

How Long Can You Stay Onboard Before Disembarkation

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On the Pacific Jewel for a short 2 night cruise and have a late flight and just wondering how long I can stay onboard till they kick me off LOL. Just hoping to enjoy the cruise for as long as possible. Any thoughts?

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Don't know specifically for your ship, but most cruise lines operate similarly in that you will need to be out of your stateroom by about 8:00 - 8:30 AM so that they can begin to turn the staterooms for the next itinerary, and off the ship between 9:30 - 10:00 AM. The ship will need to have all passengers off so that it can clear customs in preparation for boarding the passengers for the next itinerary, which typically begins around 11:00 - 11:30 AM.

 

Just as you will be anxious to get on board day one as soon as possible, so will the next group of passengers, so you cannot stay on board very long on the last day to allow the process of disembarkation and embarkation to continue.

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Assuming the ship will dock early AM.....10-ish is usually about the latest most lines want passengers off by. Pools, shops, restaurants (after breakfast), casinos are closed, so there's not much to do other than sit around and wait.

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Agree about 10 is latest, but our Europe cruise on a sister ship they offered a package that allowed you to stay on extra at a cost , do not remember how much .

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Agree about 10 is latest, but our Europe cruise on a sister ship they offered a package that allowed you to stay on extra at a cost , do not remember how much .

There are probably a bunch of differences - but the significant one is the US requirement to 'zero out' the passenger count before they can start boarding passengers [and their luggage].

Even passengers in transit [say sailing from Southampton to New York to Quebec as a single booked voyage] will need to get off the ship and wait in NY until the ship is cleared for boarding.

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Don't know specifically for your ship, but most cruise lines operate similarly in that you will need to be out of your stateroom by about 8:00 - 8:30 AM so that they can begin to turn the staterooms for the next itinerary, and off the ship between 9:30 - 10:00 AM. The ship will need to have all passengers off so that it can clear customs in preparation for boarding the passengers for the next itinerary, which typically begins around 11:00 - 11:30 AM.

 

Just as you will be anxious to get on board day one as soon as possible, so will the next group of passengers, so you cannot stay on board very long on the last day to allow the process of disembarkation and embarkation to continue.

Exactly. Just to add B2B (consecutive) passengers can not complete the TAD process until the ship has been cleared.

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On the Pacific Jewel for a short 2 night cruise and have a late flight and just wondering how long I can stay onboard till they kick me off LOL. Just hoping to enjoy the cruise for as long as possible. Any thoughts?

 

 

out of the cabin by 8 and off NLT 10 in most instances. breakfast ends much earlier and nothing else will be open.

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We normally favour a relaxed disembarkation, since we never book flights shortly after arrival We enjoy breakfast in the dining room, then collect our bags from the cabin before the cut-off time (usually about 08:00). We then find a lounge to sit and read. If you have status on some Lines, they provide tea/coffee. On some ships we found the bars did accept cash for a pot of tea.

 

When they make the final calls for disembarkation, we head ashore. Every cruise varies, as we have seen it as early as about 09:30, but normally between 10:00 and 11:00.

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Last cruise we were on (Celebrity/Barcelona) everyone had to be off by 9:30.

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It depends on how long it takes for them to find you .. I have been living in a lifeboat for the last 2 months LOL

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It depends on how long it takes for them to find you .. I have been living in a lifeboat for the last 2 months LOL

At least you won't go hungry.

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Impossible to answer. You will be in a public area ,with nothing to do and maybe provided water. where people will be leaving as the clock ticks by. They have to get the ship ready for the next cruise. It all depends on how fast the rest of the ship gets off.

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As others have indicated, there is little 'enjoyment' on the last morning of a cruise! Crew who have, hitherto, been only too pleased to help are too busy to care, shops and bars are closed and public areas are packed with passengers - + hand luggage - waiting to disembark.

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Not much to enjoy on the ship the last morning except an early breakfast in the dining room. (Which is usually more rushed than at sea breakfast.)

 

You might want to consider scheduling a private tour on debarkation day that will end at the airport. Maybe you can find someone on your roll call to share.

 

Alternatively, most cruises have excursions on debarkation day for people with late flights.

 

Sent from my SM-T113 using Forums mobile app

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Hanging around an emptying cruise ship, while the staff are focusing on clearing things for the new batch of passengers — rather than providing the service that previously made being on board enjoyable — may be compared to staying in your seat after the movie ends and the lights come up. Yes: your seat used to be where you enjoyed yourself; but it is over, accept it and leave.

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The cruise is over. Other people are waiting for you to leave so that they can get on. Nothing is happening on the ship.

 

Time to GET OFF.

 

DON

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The cruise is over. Other people are waiting for you to leave so that they can get on. Nothing is happening on the ship.

 

Time to GET OFF.

DON

Agree!

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No matter how far along the crew has readied the ship for the next trip, EVERY pax has to be off the ship before the next phase of embarkation can start. Once took a cruise where embarkation was delayed two hours. Somehow one pax had left the ship with out going through security. Entire ship had to be searched.

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No matter how far along the crew has readied the ship for the next trip, EVERY pax has to be off the ship before the next phase of embarkation can start. Once took a cruise where embarkation was delayed two hours. Somehow one pax had left the ship with out going through security. Entire ship had to be searched.
What is the rationale for searching the entire ship ?

What could they possibly find?

The pax did not ENTER the ship without going through security, he merely exited without going through security.

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What is the rationale for searching the entire ship ?

What could they possibly find?

The pax did not ENTER the ship without going through security, he merely exited without going through security.

 

Agree that it sounds a bit confusing, but maybe - if as you suggest they left without somehow scanning their ship card at exiting - they were searching the ship to make certain that the passenger actually left and was not still somewhere on board. In that case what the were hoping to find (or not find) was the passenger so that they could confirm clearance of the ship.

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What is the rationale for searching the entire ship ?

What could they possibly find?

The pax did not ENTER the ship without going through security, he merely exited without going through security.

 

I'll hazard a guess that they were searching the ship for the passenger, not what he/she left behind.

Since the passenger didn't go thro security they won't have had their boarding card scanned on leaving, so presumably the cruise line didn't know whether he/she was still aboard.

(thunter - I'll also hazard a guess that they searched the lifeboats, so I reckon you're lying about living on a lifeboat for 2 months :D)

 

BTW, I won't disagree with those who've posted that you have to be off the ship by about 10am, or that b2b passengers have to disembark & re-board - but there are exceptions.

For instance those sailing fly-cruises on UK ships from distant ports like the Med or the Caribbean have the run of the ship (but not their cabin) until their transfer to the airport is called - often late-afternoon. This is because those taking the next cruise arrive on the (chartered) aircraft that will be taking them home. Those leaving on late flights are still on the ship when new cruisers arriving on early flights are still aboard.

Nor do folk on those b2b fly-cruises have to disembark/re-board.

All very civilised :cool: - and one of the reasons why I recommend a Brit ship for Brits taking their first cruise.

 

JB :)

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What is the rationale for searching the entire ship ?

What could they possibly find?

The pax did not ENTER the ship without going through security, he merely exited without going through security.

 

Hardly a logical conclusion: his having entered after going through security means that he HAD BEEN on board. The lack of evidence of his departing through security indicates only that he did not go through security ,or that the security scan was defective.

 

Ergo: a) he slipped off without going through security,

b) there was a breakdown in the security scanning,

c) he was still somewhere on board - at least as

likely as the other conclusions.

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Agree that it sounds a bit confusing, but maybe - if as you suggest they left without somehow scanning their ship card at exiting - they were searching the ship to make certain that the passenger actually left and was not still somewhere on board. In that case what the were hoping to find (or not find) was the passenger so that they could confirm clearance of the ship.
Thanks, you are absolutely right! They would be searching to see if he was still on board.

For Med cruises, where only SOME passengers disembark at a given port; what is the latest time allowed for those who are actually disembarking?

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What is the rationale for searching the entire ship ?

What could they possibly find?

The pax did not ENTER the ship without going through security, he merely exited without going through security.

 

If he was still onboard, the search would have ended when he was found. The next sailing cannot be boarded until the ship can demonstrate zero passengers on board.

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