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jmspls72

Accessible option from seattle to Vancouver

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I am planning a cruise to Alaska that is supporting out of Vancouver. Though flights are obviously cheaper to fly into Seattle since the budget airlines that come out of St. Louis flight to Seattle. I know there is a quick shuttle that can take you from the airport to the cruise port in Vancouver but I have a question regarding the ability for the quick shuttle to be able to pack my gogo scooter. Does anyone have experience with quick shuttle service at Seattle Also can anyone recommend other accessible option to get from Seattle to Vancouver that don’t require a car rental. My wife doesn’t want to have to drive

 

Thanks for the help

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You could look into the Amtrak from Seattle to Vancouver, Then a taxi to the port.

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You could look into the Amtrak from Seattle to Vancouver, Then a taxi to the port.

 

I think about that can the acommadate my luggage and scooter

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I think about that can the acommadate my luggage and scooter

 

If the train doors are not level with the platform, they will have a lift that will take you and your scooter to the level of the train. The attendants will help your wife with the luggage that you are not carrying or have not checked. I think you can check bags from Seattle to Vancouver. If you need more info about Amtrak, there is a forum for train trael enthusiasts here:

 

http://discuss.amtraktrains.com/

 

Despite the name, it is not affiliated with Amtrak. You don't have to join to post on the Guest forum. Lots of helpful people there. EM

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No problem with wheelchairs/scooters on Cascades, and I'd agree that it is hands-down the most accessible-friendly method of travel available to a visitor in the region without their own modified vehicle. Stations are unfortunately almost never built level with the train doors - Cascades uses a unique European carriage design that is all single level, so once you are onboard in theory you could roll around the entire train if you wanted. If you travel with a folding chair, they will not allow you to sit in it - you have to transfer into a train seat and staff will take your chair away for storage and bring it back to you as needed.

 

They also ask that you book by phone rather than online, to ensure they know you are coming and what level of help you need; there are limited accessible seats so an advance booking is strongly preferred. Here's the Accessibility section from the official website cut & pasted for your convenience (can't link direct to that section in their Rider Guide because of how the website is built!):

ACCESS FOR EVERYONE

 

Everyone can travel on Amtrak Cascades. Our goal is to provide safe, efficient, and comfortable service to all of our passengers. We are pleased to provide additional services to passengers with disabilities. Each Amtrak Cascades train has space for at least four mobility-impaired passengers. Braille signage is available throughout the train and audio and open captioning for travel information is provided on all overhead monitors. Amtrak Cascades is one of the most accessible passenger trains in the world with features accommodations for four mobility-impaired passengers on each train.

MAKING A RESERVATION

 

Reservations are required for Amtrak Cascades. To obtain special accommodations, we recommend that you make reservations and purchase tickets by:

 

Pay for your ticket once you're on the train, if you boarded at an unstaffed station or were unable to pay beforehand because of a disability. The onboard purchase fee will be waived for passengers who had no way to purchase tickets in advance.

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There are only two actual trains--one in the early morning and one in the late evening. The rest of the trips are conducted by bus. It may have changed, but some of the buses didn't used to be wheelchair accessible (lift) and I don't know about putting a scooter in the baggage compartment underneath the bus. So be certain and look at the options carefully if you want to use Amtrak.

 

 

Quick Shuttle also operates buses which are wheelchair accessible. You have to call Reservations to make the reservation and arrangements. We have taken both the train and the Quick Shuttle. When we could not get the actual train, we booked the Quick Shuttle because it was cheaper than the Amtrak bus service. We really did enjoy the train because it was so scenic. (We took the morning train--don't know how much you can see on the late night train.)

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