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Sky Princess Captain

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Senior officers (in fact, none of the officers, staff, and crew) are on the ship 365 days a year. They get time off. My impression (someone with more knowledge can correct) is that there is a prime set of officers who spend about 2/3 of their time on the ship (the other 1/3 being vacation time) and a relief set of officers who cover the other 1/3 of the time but cover two ships. So, a captain might be on for four months, then the relief captain for two, the prime captain for four, then the relief captain for another two. The relief captain spends two months on one ship, then two months on another, then two months off.

 

And before someone says that's a lot of vacation time, do remember that when they're on the ship, they work 24/7 (yes, they get to sleep but they are always at risk of being woken up for a situation that needs their decision).

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I know that was how we originally met Captain Tuvo.  Did not realize they actually announce it that way.  Maybe i missed it in the past.  THX

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I just got off Royal Caribbean Symphony with 6,680 passengers. At the question and answer with the captain, he said there were 2 captains respondable for the ship and they work 10 weeks on and 10 weeks off.

 

I would think that Princess captains might work the same way.

Edited by phabric

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3 hours ago, lstone19 said:

Senior officers (in fact, none of the officers, staff, and crew) are on the ship 365 days a year. They get time off. My impression (someone with more knowledge can correct) is that there is a prime set of officers who spend about 2/3 of their time on the ship (the other 1/3 being vacation time) and a relief set of officers who cover the other 1/3 of the time but cover two ships. So, a captain might be on for four months, then the relief captain for two, the prime captain for four, then the relief captain for another two. The relief captain spends two months on one ship, then two months on another, then two months off.

 

And before someone says that's a lot of vacation time, do remember that when they're on the ship, they work 24/7 (yes, they get to sleep but they are always at risk of being woken up for a situation that needs their decision).

Actually.......

They do 10 week contracts.

Then vacation.

There is also a Staff Captain who handles crew and ship maintenance.

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We’re on the Sky’s inaugural TA from Barcelona & a person on our roll call who recently sailed with Capt Tuvo was told by him that he would board in Lisbon to take the helm during the crossing to Port Everglades & for the Caribbean season.

 

I haven’t had the pleasure of sailing with him but have read many posts about his charming Italian personality & connection to his passengers.

Edited by Astro Flyer

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We had the Captain Tuvo experience for repositioning from Los Angeles to San Antonio (Chile) in December 2018 on the Star Princess - he was great. Set a very upbeat and positive tone across the ship, was very personable - even showed up at our Cruise Critic Meet & Greet, and had near about everyone adopting his catchphrase by the end of the two weeks. (As it turns out, he also has a very sensible reason for its use.) 

 

It was like a completely different ship for the following leg from San Antonio to Buenos Aires - not that it was necessarily a negative, but it definitely made me a believer that a captain could visibly and significantly contribute to the character and positive experience of a cruise. Lucky Sky.

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Masters & Senior officers - Navigation & Engineering - do a 1 on 1 off rotation. Therefore there are 2 officers for each position as per the press release from Princess. Only Capt. Tuvo was able to be present.

Please do not use the ignorant media saying that Capt. X takes the helm. Including Princess media.

When a new or first master takes over the ship - he takes command of that vessel - that is the law.

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2 hours ago, Crewbie said:

it definitely made me a believer that a captain could visibly and significantly contribute to the character and positive experience of a cruise. Lucky Sky.

 

This has been my experience as well.  The ship's Senior Officers--not just the ship's Master but the Hotel Manager, etc.--may make a difference in the experience that we guests have.  If they are "out and about" and are working along the side of the crew, it does make a difference, I think.

 

I recently disembarked the Royal Princess.  The Bar Manager, Monica, was visible and at work at the bars when those venues were overloaded with work.  The bar service in every lounge I visited on this ship was excellent.  Why?  Their "Boss" was visible and willing to help when it was needed. 

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11 minutes ago, rkacruiser said:

 

This has been my experience as well.  The ship's Senior Officers--not just the ship's Master but the Hotel Manager, etc.--may make a difference in the experience that we guests have.  If they are "out and about" and are working along the side of the crew, it does make a difference, I think.

 

I recently disembarked the Royal Princess.  The Bar Manager, Monica, was visible and at work at the bars when those venues were overloaded with work.  The bar service in every lounge I visited on this ship was excellent.  Why?  Their "Boss" was visible and willing to help when it was needed. 

I quite agree. We were on Regal Princess in the Baltic 2-1/2 years ago and the dining room service was excellent. One reason for that I believe was the Maitre D' was very visible. We had a table in the MDR next to the Chef's Table and I was able to watch him not only personally supervise the meal but he wasn't afraid to stick his hands in when an extra pair of hands was needed with the service. And it was obvious he had a good working relationship with the servers who worked the table - when you see the boss and a server appear to share a laugh about something, the relationship must be right. In addition, it appeared to me he made sure he had good people on the tables next to the Chef's Table as one evening he grabbed our waitress to help him for 30 seconds (yet another pair of hands so that the table could be presented their plates together). Didn't affect our service but clearly she was not surprised to be asked to help for a few seconds.

 

Four months later, we were back on Regal with a different Maitre D', one who we only saw at his ceremonial tasks (Champagne Waterfall and the culinary demonstration). And it showed. Service was for the most part so-so as if everyone knew nobody would be checking on them.

 

Last, thank to those above who corrected me on schedules the senior officers work.

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