Jump to content
Cruise Critic Community
Sign in to follow this  
IslandThyme

How to talk nicely with Aussies and Kiwis?

Recommended Posts

I am an Australian American and to be honest there is no real difference. We both love our sport, are very laid back. Australians are probably more laid back than Americans and live by "no worries" or "she'll be right". Australian usually complain less and don't have as high an expectation when it comes to service. All in all there is no real difference hence why Aussies and Americans get on so well.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am a kiwi (NZ) and my response to your question would be this,  while travelling in NZ.   I wouldn't worry so much about protocol while you are here.  Any greeting works fine, people won't be too bothered.  If you greet a Maori it would be nice to greet them with Kia Ora, nobody seems to say it the same way but just that you have made an effort helps.  Sometimes this greeting is used in the tourist industy, eg hotels etc but sometimes not.  Generally people here are very laid back and friendly if you engage them in conversation, irrespective of where you come from.  Generally we don't talk politics or Treaty of Waitangi issues.  If you are interested in the treaty I suggest you read up on it or visit the Waitangi Treaty grounds.  Honestly we just want visitors to enjoy their time here.  If you are looking for conversation starters, go lightly, eg weather, nice places to visit nothing to polarizing and you will be fine. Don't tip here, its not necessary, unless you feel that someone has gone over and above in their service.  Don't feel guilty, no one will take any notice.  Enjoy. Hope this helps 🙂

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 8/16/2019 at 3:44 PM, brian1 said:

She'll be safe in NZ,they are eradicating all introduced species.I was wondering how far down the list are the £10 Poms.

Is that British, Strayan or Kiwi Pounds, young Brian ?  🥰

 

It has long been debated who actually paid the balance of the migrants fare, the UK Govt to get rid of them or the Australian Govt for wanting them.  Having researched the issue, I believe it was 50/50.  If the migrant returned back to UK before they had 2 years here, they had to pay back the full freight for the trip, whether they came solo or family.  Imagine emigrating with 10 kids and going back early, having to repay the fares. Yikes.

Edited by NSWP

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
28 minutes ago, NSWP said:

Is that British, Strayan or Kiwi Pounds, young Brian ?  🥰

 

It has long been debated who actually paid the balance of the migrants fare, the UK Govt to get rid of them or the Australian Govt for wanting them.  Having researched the issue, I believe it was 50/50.  If the migrant returned back to UK before they had 2 years here, they had to pay back the full freight for the trip, whether they came solo or family.  Imagine emigrating with 10 kids and going back early, having to repay the fares. Yikes.

Out of all the post-war migrants, people from the UK had the highest rate of returns. I think it was 25%. However, many of them came here for a two year working holiday and planned to go back. Some of those like it so much they stayed. 🙂 Some who went 'home' found it wasn't the way they remembered, and came back to Australia later.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
17 hours ago, Aus Traveller said:

Out of all the post-war migrants, people from the UK had the highest rate of returns. I think it was 25%. However, many of them came here for a two year working holiday and planned to go back. Some of those like it so much they stayed. 🙂 Some who went 'home' found it wasn't the way they remembered, and came back to Australia later.

They probably missed ye olde Pork Pies, but you can buy them here now in places like Woollies or Coles, Aussie made of course.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

It’s okay IslandThyme, you will soon be able to talk to EnZedders just like everyone else from your neck of the woods.

 

Australia Offers To Sell New Zealand To US

 

 

http://www.theshovel.com.au/2019/08/22/australia-offers-to-sell-new-zealand-to-us-/?utm_source=newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=australia_offers_to_sell_new_zealand_to_us&utm_term=2019-08-23

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sarcasm and irony is used in our everyday language to a large extent. Just be aware that some people will be using it and laugh it off if you get caught out. If it sounds unbelievable, then it most likely is and google can help clarify the situation.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I notice the level of sarcasm, irony, and general snarkiness on this board, which is one reason I like to lurk here. It's a sort of cultural education all in itself,

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
25 minutes ago, IslandThyme said:

I notice the level of sarcasm, irony, and general snarkiness on this board, which is one reason I like to lurk here. It's a sort of cultural education all in itself,

I am not sure about snarkiness but if you mean 'tongue in cheek type-  having a go', then yeah.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
30 minutes ago, IslandThyme said:

I notice the level of sarcasm, irony, and general snarkiness on this board, which is one reason I like to lurk here. It's a sort of cultural education all in itself,

You know if any Aussie really hates you, when he is polite, having a go at your mate is pretty much a tradition here.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

From the urban Dictionary: "Snarky" is used to describe speech with a specific emotional tone, typically a form of sarcasm informed by cheekiness and a mild, playful irreverence or impudence. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 minutes ago, IslandThyme said:

From the urban Dictionary: "Snarky" is used to describe speech with a specific emotional tone, typically a form of sarcasm informed by cheekiness and a mild, playful irreverence or impudence. 

Whereas here Snarkiness would include an element of nastiness, perhaps not of the extreme type but there all the same.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You may also hear some language that may sound extreme to you, three that your countrymen sometimes seem a little shocked by are

 

Bugger

Bloody and

Bastard

 

dont take offence.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I guess snark can also be nasty, but I wasn't meaning it that way. I say bugger, bloody (but mainly followed by hell) and bastard with some regularity, so I'm unlikely to be offended. When I lived in France I knew several Brits, and got comfortable with their expletives. They, alas, never really accustomed themselves to my liberal use of the f word, which I won't spell out here for fear of being banned. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, IslandThyme said:

I guess snark can also be nasty, but I wasn't meaning it that way. I say bugger, bloody (but mainly followed by hell) and bastard with some regularity, so I'm unlikely to be offended. When I lived in France I knew several Brits, and got comfortable with their expletives. They, alas, never really accustomed themselves to my liberal use of the f word, which I won't spell out here for fear of being banned. 

The F word is now very common here too.

 

one cruise we were heading into town and Mrs Gut asked me something like “Hiw far is it to....” and I replied “Buggered if I know” as you do. One lovely American lady almost went into fits, “they told me people said it here”, I apologised if I offended here, but apparently it was the exact opposite I had made her trip complete.

 

Buggered if I know how bloody little to took to make same Bastards happy.

 

Also don’t be offended if you are called a Yank, it probably means they don’t find you too bad.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would say that the most common thing we all say here is sh*t. Whether you just dropped an egg on the kitchen floor, got cut off after waiting on hold with the airline help desk for 20 minutes, or wrecked your car, sh*t is the go-to all-purpose word. Would folks down under find that offensive?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, IslandThyme said:

I would say that the most common thing we all say here is sh*t. Whether you just dropped an egg on the kitchen floor, got cut off after waiting on hold with the airline help desk for 20 minutes, or wrecked your car, sh*t is the go-to all-purpose word. Would folks down under find that offensive?

You’ll hear that one too.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, GUT2407 said:

You may also hear some language that may sound extreme to you, three that your countrymen sometimes seem a little shocked by are

 

Bugger

Bloody and

Bastard

 

dont take offence.

And we don't get embarrassed wearing thongs in public.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thongs used to be what we now call flip flops. Currently thongs are a sort of unfathomably uncomfortable underwear. What are they to you all?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
17 minutes ago, IslandThyme said:

Thongs used to be what we now call flip flops. Currently thongs are a sort of unfathomably uncomfortable underwear. What are they to you all?

Both actually, but mainly what you call flip flops, the underwear is more likely to be called a G string in my experience.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
30 minutes ago, GUT2407 said:

Both actually, but mainly what you call flip flops, the underwear is more likely to be called a G string in my experience.

Do you have much experienced with G strings? 😉

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, Aus Traveller said:

Do you have much experienced with G strings? 😉

As an old guitarist??? Lots.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, IslandThyme said:

From the urban Dictionary: "Snarky" is used to describe speech with a specific emotional tone, typically a form of sarcasm informed by cheekiness and a mild, playful irreverence or impudence. 

Okay, snarky is often associated with meanness or nastiness here

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, GUT2407 said:

As an old guitarist??? Lots.

Ditto, still do. Was playing with my G string about half an hour ago.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

  • Forum Jump
    • Categories
      • Forum Assistance
      • SPECIAL EVENT: Q&A with the Quark Expeditions Team!
      • New Cruisers
      • Cruise Lines “A – O”
      • Cruise Lines “P – Z”
      • River Cruising
      • ROLL CALLS
      • Digital Photography & Cruise Technology
      • Member Cruise Reviews
      • Special Interest Cruising
      • Cruise Discussion Topics
      • UK Cruising
      • Australia & New Zealand Cruisers
      • North American Homeports
      • Ports of Call
      • Cruise Conversations
×
×
  • Create New...