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lucydney

Which Amsterdam airport

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I'm flying from the US to Amsterdam to cruise on Holland America New Statendam in August 2020. I see 2 airport options. Which airport should I fly in to? Thank you.

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3 minutes ago, lucydney said:

I'm flying from the US to Amsterdam to cruise on Holland America New Statendam in August 2020. I see 2 airport options. Which airport should I fly in to? Thank you.

 

Schipol - it’s the main International Airport.

 

And easy to get to Amsterdam from it by train (train station is right there) or by taxi, whichever you prefer

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If you want a direct flight, it will most likely be Schipol.   We flew DFW to Schipol.  We could have flown to Heathrow and then opted for the smaller airport but found it to be more expensive and less appealing than a direct flight.  

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It's Amsterdam-Schiphol with an "H" (stands for ship's hole) - Awesome airport to spend some time in full of shops and even a mini-Albert Heyn supermarket

 

What was your 2nd option? Rotterdam-The Hague?

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31 minutes ago, Copper10-8 said:

stands for ship's hole

 

I always thought that was just a story made up by tour guides!  Is it really true?  I know 'Schip hol' does sound very like 'Ship Hole'(place full of sunken ships)

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52 minutes ago, Copper10-8 said:

It's Amsterdam-Schiphol with an "H" (stands for ship's hole) - Awesome airport to spend some time in full of shops and even a mini-Albert Heyn supermarket

 

What was your 2nd option? Rotterdam-The Hague?

 

It is an amazing airport and their duty free store and other stores have the best bag in the world.  It hooks over your carry on.  LOVE it - so much so that I saved it and it goes with me on every trip as it makes life simple at the airport if we pick anything up.

 

They have some nice selection of cheeses there for sure 🙂 

 

 

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1 hour ago, VMax1700 said:

 

I always thought that was just a story made up by tour guides!  Is it really true?  I know 'Schip hol' does sound very like 'Ship Hole'(place full of sunken ships)

 

There are several legends about the name ‘Schiphol’

 

The most popular legend is that many boats sank on this site in what used to be the Haarlemmer Lake. Consequently, this place became known as: ‘Schip Holl’ or ‘Scheepshol’. ‘Schip’ and ‘Scheep’ meaning ‘ship’, and ‘hol’ meaning ‘grave’ in this context.

 

Another explanation is that the name comes from the word ‘scheepshaal’. A ‘scheepshaal’ was a ditch used for towing ships from one lake to another.

 

A third explanation is that the name comes from ‘scip hol’, which is a low-lying patch of ground (‘hol’ as in ‘Holland’). The timber that grew on this site was used to build ships (‘scip’). This may not be the most spectacular story, but it’s actually the most accurate.

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1 hour ago, Copper10-8 said:

A third explanation is that the name comes from ‘scip hol’, which is a low-lying patch of ground (‘hol’ as in ‘Holland’). The timber that grew on this site was used to build ships (‘scip’). This may not be the most spectacular story, but it’s actually the most accurate.

 

Many, many theories :). The "hol" in Holland means "wood". "Scip" also seems to have meant "wood", and it's also a predecessor of "schip" (ship). The "ship grave" and "schipshaal" are not very convincing. I can't find the definitive conclusion.

 

If a tour guide comes up with a new story, they can only make it funnier.

 

It reminds me of 2 Australians we met on a ship who, after introducing ourselves as being from "Holland", asked if we were from Holland-Holland, or The Netherlands. They were convinced that people who didn't live in the provinces "South Holland" or "North Holland" hated it when people referred to The Netherlands as "Holland". In reality, I've never met someone who cared. The fight between calling French fries "patat" ("that's just another word for a potato!") or "friet" ("that's the cooking method, not the food!") is of far greater importance. :classic_biggrin:

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3 hours ago, AmazedByCruising said:

 

Many, many theories :). The "hol" in Holland means "wood". "Scip" also seems to have meant "wood", and it's also a predecessor of "schip" (ship). The "ship grave" and "schipshaal" are not very convincing. I can't find the definitive conclusion.

 

If a tour guide comes up with a new story, they can only make it funnier.

 

It reminds me of 2 Australians we met on a ship who, after introducing ourselves as being from "Holland", asked if we were from Holland-Holland, or The Netherlands. They were convinced that people who didn't live in the provinces "South Holland" or "North Holland" hated it when people referred to The Netherlands as "Holland". In reality, I've never met someone who cared. The fight between calling French fries "patat" ("that's just another word for a potato!") or "friet" ("that's the cooking method, not the food!") is of far greater importance. :classic_biggrin:

 

 

Ok, so really it means "wood-wood" from "Holland-Holland". 😎

Just enjoy the "friet patat" ( or is it patat friet?) 😅

Edited by VMax1700

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1 hour ago, VMax1700 said:

 

 

Ok, so really it means "wood-wood" from "Holland-Holland". 😎

Just enjoy the "friet patat" ( or is it patat friet?) 😅

 

"Patat Friet" (with mayonaise) in Holland, best served in a triangle-shaped paper bag :classic_smile:

 

Image result for Friet and mayo

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5 hours ago, AmazedByCruising said:

 

Many, many theories :). The "hol" in Holland means "wood". "Scip" also seems to have meant "wood", and it's also a predecessor of "schip" (ship). The "ship grave" and "schipshaal" are not very convincing. I can't find the definitive conclusion.................

 

And here I thought/was taught "hout" means wood :classic_wink:. Also, "hol" means hollow in Dutch.

 

You are right on however; the word Sciphol first appears in old documents from around 1450 and refers to a stretch of land. This area was part of Aalsmeer, located south of Amstelveen, but was most certainly not a lake or sea. It was in fact a marshy area where people could go to gather wood. Schip Holl dates from the 15th century and combines the Gothic words ‘Skip’ (meaning wood, timber) and Holl (low-lying land). Later on a fort was also built on this spot, which carried the same name.

 

 

5 hours ago, AmazedByCruising said:

 

 

 

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The picture of the french fries has made me hungry!  When ordering fries, ‘patat’ is used  in the north of the country and down south they order a ‘friet.’

thanks for the information about Schiphol.  I always thought if was actually built on a ‘ships hole’- so on the sea.   

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