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Animals in dining areas?

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55 minutes ago, iancal said:

I think that they should be in kennels.  Kept in enclosures in a ships kennel so that the owner could get some emotional support while visiting their little darlings.

ESA's should not be on the ship at all.  True service animals should be welcome anywhere.

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I love animals and don't mind having well behaved animals in the dining room.  However, I get truly annoyed when people lie to get their animal on board.  Before I get flamed, I don't think everyone lies.  True service animals are easily recognizable, less so emotional comfort pets.  Like everything else, though, some find their way around the rules, because that's what they want to do, others be damned.  

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I am good with that!  It is even better. 

 

 All it takes is for the cruise line to say no or to deny embarkation... for both of them.

Edited by iancal

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36 minutes ago, 3rdGenCunarder said:

 

What you describe is what I've always seen with REAL service dogs. They stay close to the owner, quiet, and on the floor. So it would be easy for HAL to make these restrictions clear to anyone taking a dog on board. It's no change from standard expectations for the real service dogs and it would let the cheaters know that their dogs won't be allowed to misbehave. 

 

 

You are right, and HAL does have such guidelines they give anyone who advises them they’ll be traveling with a service animal. The passenger must sign and return the rules before sailing. Example: “...ensure that my service animal is on a leash or harness when in public areas of the ship, refrains from sitting on any surface other than the floor, stays out of saunas, hot tubs, pools or the ‘beach’ area surrounding the pool, and does not eat in public areas of the ship.”

 

People with actual service dogs read the rules and take them seriously. Such behavioral rules are incorporated from Day One into our dogs’ DNA and reinforced daily.  I know a lot of service dog teams trained to high standards by respected nonprofit organizations, and not one of their handlers would ever feed their dog ship’s food at the table or allow it to sit on a chair in a lounge. 

 

People who are determined to bring their family pets on board sign the form and ignore the rules. Just like people who pay bribes to send their brainless kids to top colleges so mom & dad get bragging rights - there are always going to be people who cheat.

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27 minutes ago, Caribbean Chris said:

 

You are right, and HAL does have such guidelines they give anyone who advises them they’ll be traveling with a service animal. The passenger must sign and return the rules before sailing. Example: “...ensure that my service animal is on a leash or harness when in public areas of the ship, refrains from sitting on any surface other than the floor, stays out of saunas, hot tubs, pools or the ‘beach’ area surrounding the pool, and does not eat in public areas of the ship.”

 

People with actual service dogs read the rules and take them seriously. Such behavioral rules are incorporated from Day One into our dogs’ DNA and reinforced daily.  I know a lot of service dog teams trained to high standards by respected nonprofit organizations, and not one of their handlers would ever feed their dog ship’s food at the table or allow it to sit on a chair in a lounge. 

 

People who are determined to bring their family pets on board sign the form and ignore the rules. Just like people who pay bribes to send their brainless kids to top colleges so mom & dad get bragging rights - there are always going to be people who cheat.

 

Good to know that HAL does this. It makes it easier for people to complain about the cheaters. When Front Desk staff say "but it's a service dog," we have an answer--the owner agreed to control the dog and isn't doing that. I've never seen a real service dog doing anything that I could imagine complaining about.

 

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3 hours ago, iancal said:

I think those so called emoitional support animals should be in be in kennels. 

 

Kept in enclosures in a ships kennel so that the owner could get some emotional support while visiting their little darlings...in the kennel area.  

 

The QM2 has kennels on board, and areas to visit with the pets.

I'm not sure if any other ship has that.

I understand the pet/kennel reservations are full far in advance.

 

GC

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5 hours ago, iancal said:

Agree.  My first reaction would be to throw the little foo foos overboard.  I have little patience for so called emotional support animals in public venues.  Especially cruise ships. 

 

 

 

That is a really nasty thing to say.

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The dog is no doubt cleaner than some passengers.

I have absolutely no problem with a clean, supervised and well behaved pet in any restaurant.

 

and cats are part of the charm in Greece and Cyprus, the animals do nothing wrong And we feed them every time from our plates. 

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27 minutes ago, Despegue said:

The dog is no doubt cleaner than some passengers.

I have absolutely no problem with a clean, supervised and well behaved pet in any restaurant.

 

and cats are part of the charm in Greece and Cyprus, the animals do nothing wrong And we feed them every time from our plates. 

I appreciate your sentiment and those are your choices.  But they are choices and should not be hoisted on people who don't want to eat with animals.  Animals are no cleaner than any human and bites from any animal can be a dangerous medical emergency.  I think everyone in this thread understands the difference between a highly trained working animal and an untrained pet or worse wild animal.  

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We found no 'charm' whatsoever in the cats, some of them no doubt feral, that were the Greek in Cypriot tavernas.

 

We did not feed them.  We did not appreciate them reaching up to our chairs and clawing.  Clean????  How exactly would one know a clean one for one that had, say rabies or some other disease?

 

We have had house pets, dogs, etc, and we loved them.  But we treated them as animals and were kind to them.  We we traveled they were boarded.  Why on earth would we ever want to take them on a cruise, on a land vacation. Seems a little cruel to subject them to that.  Or to subject our fellow travelers to our silly, selfish indulgences.

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17 hours ago, GeezerCouple said:

 

How is priority determined in the case of an airplane?

I've heard that the "allergic person" is the one who must be "re-accommodated" on a later flight.

 

GC

Great example of PC out of control!

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19 minutes ago, echoshipmate said:

Great example of PC out of control!

Nope,

 

the person who has the pet onboard has made this clear in the reservation and has often payed an extra fee.

If someone is allergic to anything onboard, then he/she will be accommodated as good as practically possible, but if the allergy is so severe, then unfortunately that passenger will not be able to board and alternative solutions will be found.

 

it is obviously different when such passenger has made a special request when booking.

 

 

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My mother in law is deaf. She has a small dog that trained from a puppy to be a service animal.

The dog is never allowed treats from the table or to sit anywhere but the floor next to her owner.

a working dog will have a vest saying not to pet me I’m working.

I would hate for a fire or alarm of any kind to sound when my mother on law doesn’t have her dog with her. 
It’s a danger, she needs her service dog in every situation, planes, trains, cars and cruise ships.

My mother in law does pay extra to travel with the animal.

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1 hour ago, TheJurea said:

My mother in law is deaf. She has a small dog that trained from a puppy to be a service animal.

The dog is never allowed treats from the table or to sit anywhere but the floor next to her owner.

a working dog will have a vest saying not to pet me I’m working.

I would hate for a fire or alarm of any kind to sound when my mother on law doesn’t have her dog with her. 
It’s a danger, she needs her service dog in every situation, planes, trains, cars and cruise ships.

My mother in law does pay extra to travel with the animal.

These are exactly the very valid circumstances and need of a true service dog that should not be jeopardized by people that simply do want to leave their pets at home.  

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3 hours ago, TheJurea said:

It’s a danger, she needs her service dog in every situation, planes, trains, cars and cruise ships.

My mother in law does pay extra to travel with the animal.

 

It’s unfortunate that she is being charged extra to travel with her service dog. You might want to let her know that It’s against the ADA law for a vendor to do so. Service dogs are medical equipment like wheelchairs. I’ve never been charged anything by airlines, cruiselines, hotels, tour buses, shore excursion operators etc. for my hearing dog to accompany me.

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On 10/31/2019 at 9:16 PM, GeezerCouple said:

 

How is priority determined in the case of an airplane?

I've heard that the "allergic person" is the one who must be "re-accommodated" on a later flight.

 

GC

I don’t work for airlines so I can’t answer for them.  I will say that the ADA is not a “PC” document.  It makes sure that someone with a disability is accommodated and not made to jump through too many hoops to try to live a “regular” life.  

 

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I have trained dogs for many years and have worked with some dogs which are being trained as reliable and valued service dogs including dogs that will eventually become guide dogs. I also often have to explain to people that a service dog, an emotional support dog, and a therapy dog are 3 different things (or animals). That said.... even for a true service dog - the ADA act allows for a business to have a service animal removed for being undisciplined which includes continued barking, attacking, and lack of proper "bathroom" habits. People really need to read the act - including the various carriers. The animal should be clean, well behaved and under control. I once was seated next to a so-called service dog who was a dirty, unbrushed, and smelled like a sewer. Fortunately it was a short flight but the airline would have been within their rights to refuse to board the animal. I suspect they felt the owner would make a public ruckus and it was easier to let it go. I am afraid that is the case many times.... and then people can get letters, certificates, etc. on line or from sympathetic professionals.

 

I have 3 dogs and none would cruise with me. I would spend more time caring for them than enjoying the cruise.

 

 

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11 hours ago, durangoscots said:

I have trained dogs for many years and have worked with some dogs which are being trained as reliable and valued service dogs including dogs that will eventually become guide dogs. I also often have to explain to people that a service dog, an emotional support dog, and a therapy dog are 3 different things (or animals). That said.... even for a true service dog - the ADA act allows for a business to have a service animal removed for being undisciplined which includes continued barking, attacking, and lack of proper "bathroom" habits. People really need to read the act - including the various carriers. The animal should be clean, well behaved and under control. I once was seated next to a so-called service dog who was a dirty, unbrushed, and smelled like a sewer. Fortunately it was a short flight but the airline would have been within their rights to refuse to board the animal. I suspect they felt the owner would make a public ruckus and it was easier to let it go. I am afraid that is the case many times.... and then people can get letters, certificates, etc. on line or from sympathetic professionals.

 

I have 3 dogs and none would cruise with me. I would spend more time caring for them than enjoying the cruise.

 

 

 

(bold is mine) Sadly, I think you're right. It would be all over social media and then picked up by news broadcasts--Service Dog not allowed on Airplane! No business wants bad publicity like that. 

 

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13 minutes ago, 3rdGenCunarder said:

 

(bold is mine) Sadly, I think you're right. It would be all over social media and then picked up by news broadcasts--Service Dog not allowed on Airplane! No business wants bad publicity like that. 

 

 

And thus, the barbarians win.

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