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kazu

Heads Up - Looks like wifi/internet changes are coming - situation on the Koningsdam

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11 hours ago, kazu said:

 

It’s certainly true right now on the Koningsdam.  Whether it goes fleet wide or not, I don’t know but fore warned is fore armed.

 

May be it is a  trial à la $10 more for a second entrée in the MDR. Koningsdam may be their test bed.

If enough  passengers complain in the coming  months, they will quietly stop the practice

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12 hours ago, *Miss G* said:

 

I was on Koningsdam and had the same experience as the OP’s friend; unable to log in on different devices.

 

Before Unlimited, the rule was one device at a time, but not one device for the whole cruise.

 

I had the same problem last January. I used my laptop first, to set up the account. Later, I used my phone for something quick. But to check email I prefer to use my laptop. Tried to log on with the laptop and was told I was already online with something else. Um, no. I had logged off and turned off my cell phone. So I had to turn on the phone, log on so that I could log off again. Still couldn't get my laptop to log on. Concierge said I should clear cookies right before logging in. "Computer guy" was no help the one and only time I was actually able to find him. 

 

Fortunately, I was in a NS, so I could use their computer for email. I don't normally cling to my phone or laptop when I'm traveling, but my niece was due to have her baby any day. There were some potential problems, so I really wanted to know what was going on. She and baby were OK, but some of my excursions into HAL tech land weren't good for MY blood pressure!

 

Why is tech at its worst when you need it most?!?

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10 minutes ago, 3rdGenCunarder said:

Why is tech at its worst when you need it most?!?

 

Hahahaha.  So true.

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Hello fellow cruisers,

 

I was on the Koningsdam for four back-to-back sailings this Summer and Fall and the internet worked as it had on past cruises. I was able to switch back and forth between my iPhone and iPad freely. I would get a message asking if I wanted to log off my other device in order to log in to my second device. Once I clicked “yes” I was logged in. 
 

Actually,  I had been pleasantly surprised by the strength of the internet signal throughout the trip as it worked much better than other cruises I’ve been on. So I hope they’re not making changes. 
 

Andrea

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3 hours ago, *Miss G* said:

 

Yes, it needs to be the first device.  I know @POA1 posted how to connect so I am hoping he sees these tags as I cannot find that post.

 

 

Hopefully these explanations and instructions by @POA1 will help:

 

Hotspot Router Mode

 

Mobile Router

 

The instructions are going to vary by the router you have. Mine allows me to clone the MAC address of the connecting computer which means that the network "sees" my laptop regardless of what's connected. You can probably get away without cloning the MAC address, but some networks block router MACs in order to force additional charges. The MAC address is the hardware address of the network adapter. It's how networks identify the physical devices. Normally the MAC address is fixed, but many routers allow you to change the MAC address so the router looks like another device.

 

I'll have to see if I can find my old post regarding my travel router. I'll post a link if/when I find it. Essentially, the ship's network sees my laptop even though my laptop, our phones and DW's tablet are all connected via the router.

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My, oh my.... I forgot what a joy it is to search for content here on CruiseCritic. It's a good thing I wrote the darn post, @*Miss G*, otherwise I'd have never found it. Thank goodness I gave the network the SSID "PoohbyNet" or I'd have been screwed.

 

Anyway.... The post is here:

 

https://boards.cruisecritic.com/topic/2614573-twas-the-cruise-during-christmas-zuiderdam-2018/?do=findComment&comment=56382749

 

I have last year's model of TP Link's travel router. You can find the new one here. It's the TP-Link TL-WR902AC. It's $34.97 on Amazon. My model is the TL-WR802N. The new model has more indicator lights. I'm not sure if it's got additional capabilities that make it worth $5 more than last year's model. Although, from a technical standpoint, more flashing blinky lights is always better. You'll want to pick up a small lipstick battery pack to power the router if you don't already have one. I use an Anker PowerCore 3350 mAh ($19.99) but use whatever you have. A 3,000 mAh battery will run the router for days.

 

41+G3-QK36L._AC_SL1000_.jpg

 

The form factor is the same for old and new models, so you can get an idea of the size from my post from last year.

 

https://boards.cruisecritic.com/topic/2614573-twas-the-cruise-during-christmas-zuiderdam-2018/?do=findComment&comment=56382749

 

Edited by POA1

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For whatever reason, the photo didn't pull through with the link to my old post. I could have sworn it used to link automatically.  Here's the photo:

 

IMG_20181220_102753.jpg1244944639_Perfec

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While I'm rambling on.... If you decide to go this route, make sure you set everything up at home before you leave for vacation.

 

  1. Figure out how to connect your travel router to your network at home.
  2. Program the SSID and network passwords into every device you want to use with the router.
  3. Change the SSID (Network Name) and the PASSWORD of your router. (This is a security thing. If your default password is "admin" and your password is "password," the nearest teenager could lock you out of your router.)
  4. Write down the new password. Place it in the little travel bag that comes with your router.
  5. Write the password down again and put it in your wallet or luggage.
  6. Get used to the connection screen. You'll use it to find the best access point on the ship, based on where you are. There is a network strength finder you can use to choose the strongest AP signal. If you move about the ship, you will want to reconnect to another AP if it's got a better signal. In our case the best AP for our room was not the best for the cabanas. I simply reconnected as we moved about the ship.

You DO NOT need a PC and LAN connection to make the whole setup work. You can manage the router and connections from a phone or a tablet. I just happened to have a PC with me and connecting via a CAT 5 cable was convenient. If we were out in the evening, I stuck the router and battery in my jacket pocket and managed the connection with my phone. You just need a device with a browser.

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We were just on the Koningsdam and had no problem with 2 devices.  Of course, only one device at a time.  I had”bought” the internet, so Pat had to log out as himself, then log in again as me, then “bump” my device and click on the internet for himself.

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Update on the Koningsdam situation:

 

heard from my friend a few minutes ago and apparently it’s the description of the internet availability that is causing the confusion.

 

Their description is such that they have it worded in such that you can only use one device and additional charges apply for additional devices.  The problem is in the description of the internet services and availability.

 

In reality it should say you can use one device at a time as long as you have logged off.

 

So, in reality, it appears things are as they were.  She has tested it and it works.  Log off one device and you can still access another. (Not sure why if didn’t work for them yesterday).

 

Apologies if I had stirred the pot for no reason, but on the other hand, it’s good to know that the description of services may be misleading and to be aware just the same.

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Excellent news @kazu, and all others who posted it’s not a problem.  I especially thank you for posting this, Kazu, because it brought @POA1 out of the woodwork for his excellent technical advice.  I will now bookmark this thread for future reference.  Thank you both!  

 

Alas, I can offer no comment or solution as to why I could not get more than one device to work, even though I had logged out, etc.  That’s a mystery which will remain unsolved.  

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48 minutes ago, kazu said:

In reality it should say you can use one device at a time as long as you have logged off.

 

So, in reality, it appears things are as they were.  She has tested it and it works.  Log off one device and you can still access another. (Not sure why if didn’t work for them yesterday).

 

If they didn't go all the way to the logoff page, the session stays live until the "lease" expires. You have to go to the logoff page and actually click the logout link. Otherwise the lease stays in effect until it times out from inactivity.

 

The login/logout links are in the little Internet paper in your room, although login.com and logout.com resolve to those pages 99% of the time.

 

The lease is a negotiated connection between the DHCP server and the client device. DHCP is dynamic host control protocol and is the protocol by which devices are assigned temporary network addresses for a certain period of time.

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I'm puzzled by the emphasis on having to log off on one device on that device before you can connect another. 

This year,  on both Maasdam (May) and Zuiderdam (September), no matter which device you wanted to connect, there was always a reminder that another device was logged in, along with a button to disconnect it.

Logging in was always a nuisance since it was a multi-step process), but logging off another device was always easy, and you didn't have to get the other device and log it off.

Hour this makes sense.

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We just got off a 26 day cruise on the Koningsdam.  We had one plan and took turns using it on our cell phones.  Switching back and forth was easy.  No issues.    We did have slow connection issues when we were crossing the Atlantic, and there were a few days when the whole system was down for hours.  HAL refunded part of the cost for the plan. 

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We are currently on the Volendam and the internet is one device at a time, but as many devices as you want to use as long as you log off.  On my laptop, I get a message if my iPad is still logged on - I can click to log the iPad off.  It doesn't seem to work in reverse.  As a side note, the internet has been really difficult.  It's on, then off, then on, then off.  I am working part of the time on the ship and it's been a real challenge.

 

We were on the Westerdam in September and it was one device per internet plan and more money for each additional device.  It was spelled out quite clearly in the internet materials, so there is no misunderstanding.  My recollection is that the second and further devices were not particularly cheap to add, but a little less than the first one.

 

 

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1 hour ago, kwb101 said:

I'm puzzled by the emphasis on having to log off on one device on that device before you can connect another. 

This year,  on both Maasdam (May) and Zuiderdam (September), no matter which device you wanted to connect, there was always a reminder that another device was logged in, along with a button to disconnect it.

Logging in was always a nuisance since it was a multi-step process), but logging off another device was always easy, and you didn't have to get the other device and log it off.

Hour this makes sense.

 

Depending on what kind of pop up blockers your browser has, you don't necessarily get the warning. However, the "new" device can force the "old" device to log off. FWIW, keeping the login page open in its own browser tab seemed to do the trick. Once we logged in, we did all the surfing in a new browser tab. You need to remember that programs besides the browser can keep your connection and lease alive. I turn off auto updates for that reason. (I wish everyone would while they're traveling.)

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3 hours ago, POA1 said:

If they didn't go all the way to the logoff page, the session stays live until the "lease" expires. You have to go to the logoff page and actually click the logout link. Otherwise the lease stays in effect until it times out from inactivity.

 

The login/logout links are in the little Internet paper in your room, although login.com and logout.com resolve to those pages 99% of the time.

 

I assure you Brian that my friend knows how to do this.

 

She often uses her laptop for work and her iPad on board.  This is not new to her.

 

 

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24 minutes ago, POA1 said:

 

Depending on what kind of pop up blockers your browser has, you don't necessarily get the warning. However, the "new" device can force the "old" device to log off. FWIW, keeping the login page open in its own browser tab seemed to do the trick. Once we logged in, we did all the surfing in a new browser tab. You need to remember that programs besides the browser can keep your connection and lease alive. I turn off auto updates for that reason. (I wish everyone would while they're traveling.)

I was using HAL's Navigator app on several Android devices, no browser involved. The disconnect button was always there  at the top on the login screen...and yes, whomever clicks Disconnect last wins :)

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48 minutes ago, POA1 said:

 

Depending on what kind of pop up blockers your browser has, you don't necessarily get the warning. However, the "new" device can force the "old" device to log off. FWIW, keeping the login page open in its own browser tab seemed to do the trick. Once we logged in, we did all the surfing in a new browser tab. You need to remember that programs besides the browser can keep your connection and lease alive. I turn off auto updates for that reason. (I wish everyone would while they're traveling.)

 

I wish Microsoft would let me do that! I couldn't find the setting to control updates when I got my new laptop a few years ago (won 10), so I asked the HAL computer expert. She said that M'soft no longer allows people to turn off updates, even temporarily, because people turn it off and never turn it on again. The best I can do is set it for "metered connection," which reduces the amount of updating.

 

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40 minutes ago, 3rdGenCunarder said:

 

I wish Microsoft would let me do that! I couldn't find the setting to control updates when I got my new laptop a few years ago (won 10), so I asked the HAL computer expert. She said that M'soft no longer allows people to turn off updates, even temporarily, because people turn it off and never turn it on again. The best I can do is set it for "metered connection," which reduces the amount of updating.

 

 

Yes, set it for no updates on a metered connection, and then make sure that whatever connection you are using is set to "metered", even if it isn't really.

Then no updates unless you click to download them.

:classic_wink:

 

GC

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6 hours ago, kazu said:

So, in reality, it appears things are as they were.  She has tested it and it works.  Log off one device and you can still access another. (Not sure why if didn’t work for them yesterday).

 

Glad the system is working for them; never can tell when HAL will make a change in their internet.😯

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4 hours ago, 3rdGenCunarder said:

 

I wish Microsoft would let me do that! I couldn't find the setting to control updates when I got my new laptop a few years ago (won 10), so I asked the HAL computer expert. She said that M'soft no longer allows people to turn off updates, even temporarily, because people turn it off and never turn it on again. The best I can do is set it for "metered connection," which reduces the amount of updating.

 

To temporarily disable automatic updates on Windows 10, use these steps: Open Settings. Click on Update & Security. Click on Windows Update. Click the Advanced options button. Under the "Pause updates" sections, use the Pause until drop-down menu, and select how long to disable automatic updates

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8 hours ago, Daisyloo said:

We just got off a 26 day cruise on the Koningsdam.  We had one plan and took turns using it on our cell phones.  Switching back and forth was easy.  No issues.    We did have slow connection issues when we were crossing the Atlantic, and there were a few days when the whole system was down for hours.  HAL refunded part of the cost for the plan. 

Ditto. 

Sure glad I read all the responses before posting, I thought I’d imagined sharing the internet with DH those 26 days! We used 4 different devices with no problems as long as we used them one at a time. 

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17 hours ago, POA1 said:

 

If they didn't go all the way to the logoff page, the session stays live until the "lease" expires. You have to go to the logoff page and actually click the logout link. Otherwise the lease stays in effect until it times out from inactivity.

 

The login/logout links are in the little Internet paper in your room, although login.com and logout.com resolve to those pages 99% of the time.

 

The lease is a negotiated connection between the DHCP server and the client device. DHCP is dynamic host control protocol and is the protocol by which devices are assigned temporary network addresses for a certain period of time.

The issue is that you must log into the account in Navigator that set up the internet access.  This is the whole reason why one must logoff on one device in order to use the same account as the one that bought the access to login on any other device, regardless of whose device it is.

 

HAL obfuscates this necessity by having each individual set up an on board account to use Navigator.

 

I suspected we'd hear "the rest of the story" eventually.  😉

Edited by 0bnxshs

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I was on the Eurodam last week and I was able to use different computers as long as I logged off each one when I was finished.  I was using the ships computers in the atrium area.  If I had problems with one of the computers available, I would switch to a different one and would get a message that I needed to log off the other machine, and there was a pop up button to do that.  No problems once I logged off.  They could have better instructions available and I think that would clear up the confusion that some are finding when they try to log in with different devices.

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