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Food on Oceania

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41 minutes ago, arima22 said:

Here's the menu: https://www.oceaniacruises.com/Documents/Menus/70445/Red-Ginger-Dinner-Menu.pdf

The rice paper rolls you are looking for are under the appetizers- Summer Rolls.  Other items we find that are very good are the sea scallops (listed as entrée, but we order as an appetizer), the lamb chops, steak, etc.  In general, the amount of Asian spices used in Red Ginger is far less than you would find in an ethnic specific restaurant in the US.

Some times  the kitchen is experimenting with new ideas, off menu and they might ask you  or you might quire if you could get one of their dishes  and give then feed back.  Too , their line cooks are all Asian and the cook up stuff for themselves  and the laundry folks ( Asian) the Indian guys do that all the time rather than crew mess.  

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9 minutes ago, Hawaiidan said:

Try Linguini with carmelized onions, capers ,shrimp and Bearnaise  

I may have to fix this for dinner tonight 🙂

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I will say this.....you small group of Oceania cheerleaders are good. You manage to railroad every negative comment no matter how mild. How much does Oceania pay you?

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15 hours ago, Paulchili said:

Agree with Vancouver although I am still looking for the perfect Peking duck there. 😊

Don’t know about Lima.

Have you tried Old Beijing Roast Duck? It's actually quite new here (a little over 2 years open) and specializes in duck (though the rest of the menu is pretty good too).

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16 minutes ago, martincath said:

Have you tried Old Beijing Roast Duck? It's actually quite new here (a little over 2 years open) and specializes in duck (though the rest of the menu is pretty good too).

be nice if it was in english as most of us do not speak chinese.  Guess I will not bother to try it when we are there. 

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Our next cruise is Asia on the Nautica, will be missing Red Ginger, my favorite restaurant on Marina and Riviera!

 

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6 minutes ago, RJB said:

be nice if it was in english as most of us do not speak chinese.  Guess I will not bother to try it when we are there. 

eeeerrrr - the website is in both English and Mandarin, literally right under each Mandarin section is the English translation. As is the PDF menu (which covers only the highlights - there are many other dishes too).

 

Edit - added a screenshot.

Old Beijing Screenshot.jpg

Edited by martincath

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51 minutes ago, martincath said:

Have you tried Old Beijing Roast Duck? It's actually quite new here (a little over 2 years open) and specializes in duck (though the rest of the menu is pretty good too).

Looks very interesting and unusual - will try next time I am there.

Thanks.

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On 1/8/2020 at 7:00 PM, pinotlover said:

On the past couple of cruises, I have found the gravies and sauces to be bland, boring, and uninspired. Many other dishes that are traditionally flavorful or spicy have been bland. Purposely reduced down to neither offend or inspire anyone.

 

What that leaves are the entrees like the prime rib in the PG. Excellent dish and well prepared, but... The horseradish they offer is among the tamest I’ve ever had and the gravy , just bland. The Pad Thai served in the Terrace was totally absent of tamarind, fish sauce, or peanuts/ peanut butter leaving it to taste like noodles with brown sugar! These are just a few of the examples. Just to many dishes that are good, like meatloaf can be good, but not great or inspirational. So one does have to set their expectations somewhat.

 

The best meals I have on a cruise are rarely on the ship. That’s probably not fair competition.

 

I unfortunately find sailco’s comments from the Nautica to resemble my recent experiences.

You keep playing this tune but I'm not sure I'm dancing to it. We all have our own perceptions, mine is different than yours. I do have a few cruises on Oceania and try to eat at all the venues. 

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1 minute ago, ORV said:

You keep playing this tune but I'm not sure I'm dancing to it.

Reminds me of the old American Bandstand - "It's got a good beat but you can't dance to it" 😀

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3 hours ago, Wishing on a star said:

I wonder if one could be lucky enough to get some dishes with some added seasoning.

I agree that 'bland' is just simply NOT associated with best or finest cuisine.

That is what seems to be false and frustrating to me, as a newbie.

 

I don't do really HOT...   Hot and well seasoned can be two very different things.

It dismays me that on most cases nowadays,  seasoned means "add hot red or Serrano or ghost peppers"

No flavor,  just hot peppers.

Heat can always be added...  Delicious seasoning, not so much.

 

I wouldn't take one or two observations and think that is the way it is. Many, many cruisers are quite happy with food on Oceania. My last two cruises on Riviera(Dec) & Marina( Sept) we found the food to be excellent. I guess if you looked hard enough you could find something to complain about. 

 

Not cheerleading, just reporting my experience. 

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1 hour ago, sailco said:

I will say this.....you small group of Oceania cheerleaders are good. You manage to railroad every negative comment no matter how mild. How much does Oceania pay you?

I'm really not seeing that. Most comments seem quite fair. But when I tell you that I had the best escargots and the best creme brulee' you should believe me. I've made those dishes and I know what I'm talking about. BUT they were the best for ME.

 

Please quote a negative comment that got railroaded. Thanks in advance.

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19 hours ago, Mura said:

LOL.  I'm not to happy about what Mexican we have tried in NYC either ... although Spanish food can be very good!  I grew up in L.A. where we got excellent Mexican food back when I was young.  I have no idea of the status of Mexican food in L.A. these days ...  Hopefully it's not only Taco Bell.

 

P.S. to Pinot  about spices ... while I can see toning down spices for the traditional Oceania passengers (i.e., those who have been with O since the beginning or soon after), we're all getting older.  But if Oceania wants to attract younger passengers -- which it certainly seems it does -- then they may need to rethink some of their recipes.  I find it hard to believe that the average person in their 30s, 40s or 50s -- even their 60s -- only wants bland food ... what I might call "tasteless".

 

OTOH, I'm no spring chicken anymore and I STILL like spicy food.  DH has toned down his palette however ... But he's even older than I am!

 

Mura

 

 

 

You might be suprised....  I was at several dinners recently where  I listened to young couples-mid-30 to 40 . Many , the majority  commented they all now love their meats VERY well done because it tastes better.    I was more than amused as it seemed to represent , not a improving with age, a deterioration of it    I winced when several said they sued to get their meat medimum... but now only go for the cardboard taste of welldone  Dont forget many of these adults were weened of fast food like MC D's (where everything has the same flavor  only the costs vary.)

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You are right!  I DO find that surprising!

 

Mura

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1 hour ago, ORV said:

I wouldn't take one or two observations and think that is the way it is. Many, many cruisers are quite happy with food on Oceania. My last two cruises on Riviera(Dec) & Marina( Sept) we found the food to be excellent. I guess if you looked hard enough you could find something to complain about. 

 

Not cheerleading, just reporting my experience. 

I would agree... many folks judge foods emotionally  to their taste, which may or may not be what the rest of the heard is enjoying.    Hard to be objective.      Remember  the job of a good chef is to do as little as possible to a product and  not change it. or screw it up.   Sauces were developed to originally hide bad or spoiled product.    You can always add to a dish... to your taste.... thats up to you      To others many have to consider health risks of higher seasoned products and have to compromise because of  the desire to live life.

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OMG...  high quality tasteful tender meat WELL DONE!!!!

I guess tastes can be subjective!  Hahahaha!

 

ORV, and Dan,  (you have been so helpful to this newbie!)

I think I am one of the few who can be objective about what is good. (high quality ingredients, well prepared). and what aspects happen to meet my own personal tastes.    I do think that there are some who are not so good at that.

 

I do think that there are both sides to this.

I am not really pre-judging.  But, on other lines, I know all about the dumbed-down bland dishes.

 

I do give consideration to all comments, except for the furthest on either side.

And, I don't like my foods overly spiced or seasoned, either.

But, just saying, salsa should taste like salsa, Italian dishes (when called for) should taste Italian.

Salsa and Marinara should not be interchangeable, bland, tomato sauce.

Does that make any sense? Does that maybe help explain?

 

I do think that there is a middle ground!

I am not one who expects, or would like, overly spiced more authentic dishes.

I do admit to being one of 'those Americans'!  Hahahaha!!!

 

And, I do think I am seeing a pattern here, of certain ships/sailings.

I know that I have had excellent and sometimes awful food and service on the same line, or even a big difference on the same ship.  This can have a lot to do with who is in charge of food and dining at the time!

 

I am still excited to, one day, enjoy some great food on Oceania!

Again, we are looking at sailing on Marina.

Edited by Wishing on a star

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And, Dan,  as another example, I think you posted...

"Try Linguini with carmelized onions, capers ,shrimp and Bearnaise."

 

That might be the most fresh and well prepared plate of food...   And you would be right!!!  

But....   just personally,   I'll pass...

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43 minutes ago, Wishing on a star said:

Italian dishes (when called for) should taste Italian.

And what would that be?

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37 minutes ago, Wishing on a star said:

And, Dan,  as another example, I think you posted...

"Try Linguini with carmelized onions, capers ,shrimp and Bearnaise."

 

That might be the most fresh and well prepared plate of food...   And you would be right!!!  

But....   just personally,   I'll pass...

Mercy 🙂 What ingredient there is off-putting to you? 

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19 minutes ago, clo said:

Mercy 🙂 What ingredient there is off-putting to you? 

Well, I don't really like bearnaise. So I wouldn't go out of my way to make or try that combo. YMMV, that's the thing about food ;-)

 

I don't consider myself a cheerleader - I just went on my first Oceania cruise. I was very pleasantly surprised by the quality of the food - my husband and I really enjoyed it. My in-laws (she of the "well-done" meat and my FIL of the "lobster every night" at the Terrace) actually went to dinner with us in the Dining Room and enjoyed it (their first time in GDR but their 5th Oceania cruise). My FIL had sushi and steak bulgogi for the first time and loved them. So you never know.

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17 hours ago, Paulchili said:

I only like pleasant surprises - am I a bad person? 😀

 

Not at all.   I think most of us would.  😀

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Pasta...  Seafood....  right up my alley!!!!

Now, the caramelized onions,  and maybe the bearnaise in with the mix,  that I am not so sure about.

 

But, doesn't mean the food isn't good!!!

No way would I say, bad food.

Just that some of the selections do not meet my personal tastes!

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3 hours ago, Hawaiidan said:

Remember  the job of a good chef is to do as little as possible to a product and  not change it. or screw it up.   Sauces were developed to originally hide bad or spoiled product.    You can always add to a dish... to your taste.... thats up to you      

 

I'm going to call BS on this.

 

  1. The job of a good chef is to elevate the dish, to create delicious food, to surprise and delight the diner with flavors both subtle and not-so-subtle. Anyone can boil a fresh-from-the-water lobster the proper amount of time, serve it with some drawn butter and create a delicious meal having not "changed or screwed up" the product. That doesn't make them a chef. While I love me some good fresh lobster, I really, really appreciate the complexity and richness of a dish like lobster thermidor.
  2. Sauces may have originally been developed to hide bad or spoiled product -- but so what?  Salt was originally valued to preserve meat, but it plays a very different role today. Same with sauces. Their role has evolved. According to the Culinary Institute of America (so not just my own lowly opinion):  "Sauces are often considered one of the greatest tests of a chef’s skill. The successful pairing of a sauce with a food demonstrates technical expertise, an understanding of the food, and the ability to judge and evaluate a dish’s flavors, textures, and colors."
  3. Adding seasoning after cooking a dish does not necessarily have the same effect as proper seasoning while cooking. And not every seasoning is the same. If we're talking about salt, it's generally recommended to add salt at the beginning of the cooking process in order to ensure that the salt does its magic and seasons the entire dish, not just the outside of a piece of meat (or a potato).  Putting salt on at the last minute usually just leads to things tasting overly salty rather than flavorful.

 

 

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12 hours ago, cruisemom42 said:

 

I'm going to call BS on this.

 

  1. The job of a good chef is to elevate the dish, to create delicious food, to surprise and delight the diner with flavors both subtle and not-so-subtle. Anyone can boil a fresh-from-the-water lobster the proper amount of time, serve it with some drawn butter and create a delicious meal having not "changed or screwed up" the product. That doesn't make them a chef. While I love me some good fresh lobster, I really, really appreciate the complexity and richness of a dish like lobster thermidor.
  2. Sauces may have originally been developed to hide bad or spoiled product -- but so what?  Salt was originally valued to preserve meat, but it plays a very different role today. Same with sauces. Their role has evolved. According to the Culinary Institute of America (so not just my own lowly opinion):  "Sauces are often considered one of the greatest tests of a chef’s skill. The successful pairing of a sauce with a food demonstrates technical expertise, an understanding of the food, and the ability to judge and evaluate a dish’s flavors, textures, and colors."
  3. Adding seasoning after cooking a dish does not necessarily have the same effect as proper seasoning while cooking. And not every seasoning is the same. If we're talking about salt, it's generally recommended to add salt at the beginning of the cooking process in order to ensure that the salt does its magic and seasons the entire dish, not just the outside of a piece of meat (or a potato).  Putting salt on at the last minute usually just leads to things tasting overly salty rather than flavorful.

 

 

I attended the CIA and what I said is what they teach....  Do as little to the product as possible  Let it stand on its own.  Thats what my  teachers in St Helena stressed....     Where did you study culinary training ?

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16 hours ago, Wishing on a star said:

And, I don't like my foods overly spiced or seasoned, either.

But, just saying, salsa should taste like salsa, Italian dishes (when called for) should taste Italian.

I was wondering about this too like Clo. "Italian should taste Italian". Not sure what you meant.

And salsa should taste like salsa. There are so many different kinds- varying in heat , texture, ingredients- salsa roja, salsa picante, pico de gallo,  carrot salsa, onion salsa. Argentinian, Cuban, Costa Rican- 100's of kinds.

Do you mean Italian cuisine and salsa should taste like you're used to them tasting?

 

You said "I think I am one of the few who can be objective about what is good". I dunno, sounds subjective.

And I'd be nervous having you over for dinner to my house, lol.

🙂  (Seriously you can come anytime but I like my salsa hot, hot hot!)

Very best to you.

Edited by Petoonya

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