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marc_b2001

Conquest rusty hull???

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Been looking at recent photos and noticed quite a bit of rust on Conquest's hull, around the anchor and doors. Looks awfull! Anyone know if they will clean this up soon??? Will be on her end of Feb. These pics are from Dec 2019.200015564_Screenshot_20200119-100928_ShipMate.thumb.jpg.908ba8754cfe32ee2ce7943050d74ace.jpg29819987_Screenshot_20200119-100940_ShipMate.thumb.jpg.753ca09d5622d010d3a5a0de3930dc45.jpg

Edited by marc_b2001

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I don't think there's really any way to know for sure.  Fighting rust is an ongoing battle.  Many times I have seen them painting the hull of the ships while in port.  I would think if there is a dry dock in the schedule, repainting would be done then.  I agree that it doesn't look so great to see rust on your ship.

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Think the salt water might be the culprit here. They paint a lot when docked.

 

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as a boat owner, salt water and metal are a recipe for rust. That photo does not show much rust, easy fix.

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Gad marc, that's barely noticeable! I agree with coevan, easy fix. 

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I question the paints being used for port touch up. Todays paints must be VOC compliant. They unfortunately do not protect metal as well as older paint tecnologies did. On a recent journey cruise I watched crew touch up paint in several ports. The paint being used was not a high quality marine polyurethane coating. Those can cost upwards of $100.00/gal. I believe they were using a mid range marine enamel, perhaps in the $30.00 -45.00/gal range. It was also well thinned and way more prone to runs than a airless sprayer would be. This ship was only months out of dry dock, but no idea what, if any, refinishing was done. Top quality marine polyurethanes are more complicated to apply, and may be restricted from use in public port areas. In my opinion, all lines are fighting this to various degrees.

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I cruise both Carnival and NCL a few times a year and have noticed that in general Carnival doesn’t maintain their ships as well as NCL or other lines. We routinely see rust on our balconies and on the outside of Carnival’s ships but NCL seems to be constantly painting theirs at every port. I find the same to be true with the public spaces (worn carpets mainly). Partly because of that we stick to sailing on Vista class or newer.

Edited by cksv

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8 hours ago, runnersuzy said:

I question the paints being used for port touch up. Todays paints must be VOC compliant. They unfortunately do not protect metal as well as older paint tecnologies did. On a recent journey cruise I watched crew touch up paint in several ports. The paint being used was not a high quality marine polyurethane coating. Those can cost upwards of $100.00/gal. I believe they were using a mid range marine enamel, perhaps in the $30.00 -45.00/gal range. It was also well thinned and way more prone to runs than a airless sprayer would be. This ship was only months out of dry dock, but no idea what, if any, refinishing was done. Top quality marine polyurethanes are more complicated to apply, and may be restricted from use in public port areas. In my opinion, all lines are fighting this to various degrees.

I will tend to disagree with you on some points.  I'd like to know how you determined the quality of the paint being applied?  Nearly every shipowner in the world now uses two part polyurethane topcoats on exterior surfaces, and single or two part enamels are limited to interior surfaces.  The marine coating companies tend to have two different products for the same usage (say topside hull coating), one for shipyard application by airless spray, and one optimized for hand application for in service maintenance.  The maintenance products are "optimized" knowing that seamen will not check mil thicknesses while applying, and that if a little paint is good, a lot is better, and that is why you see runs and drips.  I believe that the modern coatings, even being VOC compliant protect metal as well as older types of coatings, but that the newer coatings require better surface preparation to obtain optimal performance.

 

As for the OP, there will almost always be rust under the anchor, even if the coating in that area is in perfect condition, because the anchor chain is steel, and is only painted every drydock, so it will rust, and this rust will run down the hawsepipe and stain the white hull below.  Covering up this staining is done all the time, but requires "cherry-picker" bucket trucks to lift the crew up there, so when it is done is limited by port, and also the cost/benefit of covering intact coating with another coat of coating.  At the hull doors, the actual edge of a steel plate is the hardest place to keep coatings intact, and again it will require surface preparation (either grinding or chipping) down to good steel, and since this is a noisy operation, the line will also do a cost/benefit analysis to determine whether to disturb the passengers or let the rust be.

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I don't mind the rust on the hull as much as I minded the rest on the ceiling of our balcony last Conquest cruise.  I figured it was just the salt air and spray that did it.  Crew members were working their way down our line of balconies scrapping and painting during our cruise when ship was in port.  The only time I complained was when they fixed our ceiling, and left all the rusty scrapping all over the balcony and chairs/table.  Some were very sharp.  The other balconies on either side were cleaned up - they must have just overlooked mine.  Called down to GS, and they had someone come up and sweep/vacuum up the shavings.  I always see painters painting the hull of the ship, railings, etc.  Must be a never-ending job.

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2 hours ago, chengkp75 said:

I will tend to disagree with you on some points.  I'd like to know how you determined the quality of the paint being applied?  Nearly every shipowner in the world now uses two part polyurethane topcoats on exterior surfaces, and single or two part enamels are limited to interior surfaces.  The marine coating companies tend to have two different products for the same usage (say topside hull coating), one for shipyard application by airless spray, and one optimized for hand application for in service maintenance.  The maintenance products are "optimized" knowing that seamen will not check mil thicknesses while applying, and that if a little paint is good, a lot is better, and that is why you see runs and drips.  I believe that the modern coatings, even being VOC compliant protect metal as well as older types of coatings, but that the newer coatings require better surface preparation to obtain optimal performance.

Bought paint for over 40 years. Enamels, epoxys and polyurethanes. Paint being used that I witnessed was not a two part polyurethane. Most touch up polyurethane is today single part. Two part mixes have a "pot life" not really conducive to manual application. Modern VOC tecnologies simply are not as durable. Another conclusion brought about by goverment regulation. Over the years have seen far to many salt spay test results, on differing paint technologies to buy into the conventional wisdom.

As for the OP, there will almost always be rust under the anchor, even if the coating in that area is in perfect condition, because the anchor chain is steel, and is only painted every drydock, so it will rust, and this rust will run down the hawsepipe and stain the white hull below.  Covering up this staining is done all the time, but requires "cherry-picker" bucket trucks to lift the crew up there, so when it is done is limited by port, and also the cost/benefit of covering intact coating with another coat of coating.  At the hull doors, the actual edge of a steel plate is the hardest place to keep coatings intact, and again it will require surface preparation (either grinding or chipping) down to good steel, and since this is a noisy operation, the line will also do a cost/benefit analysis to determine whether to disturb the passengers or let the rust be.

D

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14 hours ago, runnersuzy said:

Those can cost upwards of $100.00/gal. I believe they were using a mid range marine enamel, perhaps in the $30.00 -45.00/gal range.

 

not sure what paint you are using but bottom paint can be as high as $600 a gallon. This is like we use: https://www.westmarine.com/buy/pettit-paint--trinidad-sr-antifouling-bottom-paint-with-irgarol--P004_121_001_031?recordNum=3

 

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20 hours ago, coevan said:

as a boat owner, salt water and metal are a recipe for rust. That photo does not show much rust, easy fix.

Steel hull and rust. Very common. In the NAVY always chip and paint. You can never get ahead of it. Just cruised on the NEW Sky Princess. NEW and already exterior is rusting in areas. However I think they are on a winning streak with this new ship. I saw no steel other then the outside hull and its fittings. Inside all anodized aluminum, all stainless steel supports and hardware on the balcony. Railing covered in PVC, nothing painted that is steel. No calking around the buffet windows, rubber gaskets. Same with the window and door going to our balcony,. All wood that I saw was fake. beautiful, but fake. Railings along the corridors fake wood. Piazza had stainless steel fittings and brass railings. The ship is beautiful and well thought out. However Carnival still has the very best steak house on the sea. I would think that the Mardi Gras and all new ships will do the same.

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6 hours ago, coevan said:

 

not sure what paint you are using but bottom paint can be as high as $600 a gallon. This is like we use: https://www.westmarine.com/buy/pettit-paint--trinidad-sr-antifouling-bottom-paint-with-irgarol--P004_121_001_031?recordNum=3

 

We are talking about topside paint, not anti-fouling bottom paint, which is a whole different animal, and as you say, costs considerably more, due to the anti-fouling ingredients (copper) and the self-ablative nature of the paint film.  You don't want topside paint to wear off like bottom paint.

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also, I am painting fiberglass, not metal. Always polishing my stantions, as they always show rust spots. 

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