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maryivo

service animal announcement by NCL

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10 minutes ago, gravitar said:

 

NCL and all others can only do the following to ascertain if it is a true service dog.

 

In situations where it is not obvious that the dog is a service animal, staff may ask only two specific questions: (1) is the dog a service animal required because of a disability? and (2) what work or task has the dog been trained to perform?

 

No cards, ID or other documentation is required of a service dog.

 

Additionally

 

The ADA requires that service animals be under the control of the handler at all times. ... The service animal must be harnessed, leashed, or tethered while in public places unless these devices interfere with the service animal's work or the person's disability prevents use of these devices.

 

So if you see a dog that is not under control of their handler as stated above, you can be pretty sure it is NOT a true service animal.

 

 

While what you write is true of a brick and mortar business there are some different guidelines for the airlines with some airlines choosing to abide by the ones you wrote about in your post. I am guessing there will be guidelines for cruise ships as well. As time continues on there will be changes and adjustments made. 

 

https://www.servicedogcertifications.org/flying-with-a-service-dog-guide/

 

The Americans With Disabilities Act (ADA), with its stringent rules on accommodating service dogs in public places without requiring proof of disability, doesn’t apply on airplanes. However, the less-known Air Carrier Access Act (ACAA) prohibits airlines from discriminating against travelers with physical or mental impairments. That means they can bring their assistance animals with them on planes for free without the other restrictions for flying with pets. This is an important right for people with disabilities who need their trained service dogs to travel like anyone else. But with rising numbers of untrained emotional support animals on planes, disputes have been rising as well.

 

Let's just be kind to those with any animal in a public setting.

 

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4 minutes ago, NLH Arizona said:

Actually if they dogs are trained to alert the owner that they blood sugar are low or they are about to have a seizure, they are considered service dogs here in the states under the ADA qualifications.

 

24 minutes ago, Named-Tawny said:


Different contexts then, I suppose.  Up here in Toronto, I've seen significantly more actual service dogs being questioned (often diabetic or epilepsy support dogs), than non-service dogs trying to be passed off as genuine.


Yes, that's what I meant, sorry if it wasn't clear.  From what I've seen, I've notice that it's more frequent that actual ADA/CDA service dogs are being accused of fakery by people who don't understand, than non-service dogs being passed off as real.

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14 minutes ago, NLH Arizona said:

You can buy these on line, doesn't mean they are true service dogs.  Service dogs are not required to have any kind of ids, which I think should be correct by our government, then we wouldn't have these emotional support dogs every place you turn around.  Having emotional support animals everywhere is negative toward service dogs.  Think about it, if an emotional support animal, attacks a service dog and this does happen, the service dog does not retaliate, because it is working and its only attention is on its owner, thus they and their owner can be harmed.   Sorry this is my pet peeve.

I understand, no worries. I do agree with you there should be more protections in place for service animals. The lady I sat with had a copy of her wallet card attached to her dog. And yes, you can buy anything on the internet these days. 😱

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13 minutes ago, NLH Arizona said:

PTSD is a ADA approved disability, so if they have a trained dog for their PTSD, it is a service animal. 

I am aware of that but a lot of people are not. We had an incident near me recently where a store owner refused to allow a vet with a dog to enter his shop. Many people just see a dog and react badly. Sorry if I didn't explain my post in a better way.

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Norwegian Cruise Line accepts service dogs that are trained to perform a specific task. A service dog may be needed for many different conditions, which would be acceptable under the American with Disabilities Act (ADA) guidelines.

In accordance with the ADA, Norwegian Cruise Line does NOT accept “Emotional Support” dogs as service dogs, they CANNOT sail.

  • Guests must provide copies of the dog’s current vaccination records that show all shots are up-to-date (including Rabies), as well as a USDA or International Health certificate
  • Guests are responsible for checking with all ports of call for any special requirements they may have. Guests are responsible for bringing all food, medication and life jacket for the dog
  • A sand box will be provided

All guests traveling with service animals must book at least two weeks in advance to allow sufficient time to check with each port of call and provide Norwegian Cruise Line with all required documentation.

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3 hours ago, julig22 said:

Norwegian Cruise Line accepts service dogs that are trained to perform a specific task. A service dog may be needed for many different conditions, which would be acceptable under the American with Disabilities Act (ADA) guidelines.

In accordance with the ADA, Norwegian Cruise Line does NOT accept “Emotional Support” dogs as service dogs, they CANNOT sail.

  • Guests must provide copies of the dog’s current vaccination records that show all shots are up-to-date (including Rabies), as well as a USDA or International Health certificate
  • Guests are responsible for checking with all ports of call for any special requirements they may have. Guests are responsible for bringing all food, medication and life jacket for the dog
  • A sand box will be provided

All guests traveling with service animals must book at least two weeks in advance to allow sufficient time to check with each port of call and provide Norwegian Cruise Line with all required documentation.

Thanks so much for sharing this information. 

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9 hours ago, maryivo said:

I found this on a different thread posted in the freestyle daily as an announcement to passengers and I thought it was pretty cool.  If you have a service animal this may be of interest to you.  It also serves as information to the general public as what to do when you encounter a service animal.  Thought this was interesting and a great thing for NCL to share. (it's from  a November sailing).

 

image.png.8887884fc384a6ce4b240180b85de9f8.png

I've seen this many times in the Freestyle Daily.

 

On a recent cruise on the Gem there was a couple who had two dogs. Unfortunately the owners were not exactly a model of how service dogs should be handled by their owners, so much so that I doubted the legitimacy of the dogs' status (of course the dogs might been legit and the owners just idiots) . I saw the dogs relieving themselves on more than one occasion on the deck 7 promenade near the few lounge chairs that are provided for passengers there. Yes the owners attempted to clean up, at least superficially, but the dogs should never have been allowed to do that and their needs should have been attended to by the owners so it didn't happen.

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8 hours ago, maryivo said:

  i'm not sure of the exact policy but the law states people can have service animals everywhere they go. 

Whose "law". When you step on a NCL ship, you are on an international cruise ship, flagged in the Bahamas, entering multiple foreign ports of different countries. NCL must clear the animal into every port they enter (including the United States). Even states like Hawaii have specific entry requirements for animals and will not allow service animals to enter the state if they do not satisfy those requirements (actually, they can enter, but will be put into quarantine). 

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Posted (edited)

This was a sign outside a restaurant in Western North Carolina. 

 

Population 1150!!!!

 

This is how widespread the fake dog problem is reaching. 

 

True service animal, love it. 

 

Fake dog because you think you're precious, stay home. 

 

ETA: you are discouraged from petting a true working dog. 

 

 

20200123_075613.jpg

Edited by ToroAzul

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1 minute ago, ToroAzul said:

This was a sign outside a restaurant in Western North Carolina. 

 

Population 1150!!!!

 

This is how widespread the fake dog problem is reaching. 

 

True service animal, love it. 

 

Fake dog because you think you're precious, stay home. 

 

 

20200123_075613.jpg

Well that sums it up nicely.

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11 hours ago, njhorseman said:

On a recent cruise on the Gem there was a couple who had two dogs. Unfortunately the owners were not exactly a model of how service dogs should be handled by their owners, so much so that I doubted the legitimacy of the dogs' status (of course the dogs might been legit and the owners just idiots) . I saw the dogs relieving themselves on more than one occasion on the deck 7 promenade near the few lounge chairs that are provided for passengers there. Yes the owners attempted to clean up, at least superficially, but the dogs should never have been allowed to do that and their needs should have been attended to by the owners so it didn't happen

 

The fact that those two dogs were frequently dressed up in sailor costumes with captain's hats on was all I needed to know that they were not actual service dogs. 

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If someone  is in such a way that they medically need to take a dog on a cruise, they should not be allowed to cruise full stop. There are enough 2 legged animals on a cruise ship as it is.

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I've been on NCL and RCL cruises with questionable support dogs but have NEVER seen one on an MSC cruise (took four in the past year.)  I wonder if they have a different policy. Last ship was registered in Malta.

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I believe there is (or at least should be) an accredited training program true service animals go through.  I would seek a list of those accreditations which qualify a true service animal and require the owner to have that accreditation upon their person at all times.  Not legit accreditation?  No passage for their pet.

 

I say this as a dog owner that has had a dog and/or cat for 30 years of my life.  I love my pets.  They don’t belong on a cruise ship, in a restaurant, in a shopping mall, etc.

 

If you’re looking for ways to circumvent the rules, or ways to take your pet with you based on flimsy emotional and or mental requirement, your dog doesn’t qualify.  Leave your beloved pet home.

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7 minutes ago, Markanddonna said:

I've been on NCL and RCL cruises with questionable support dogs but have NEVER seen one on an MSC cruise (took four in the past year.)  I wonder if they have a different policy. Last ship was registered in Malta.

 

 NCL and Royal Caribbean ships aren't USA flagged either, except for Pride of America. Both companies flag their ships in the Bahamas.

 

On a USA-based itinerary all ships, regardless of registry country, are required to make reasonable ADA accommodations for passengers, which I assume would include allowing service dogs. This is the result of a US Supreme Court ruling a number of years ago. 

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6 minutes ago, njhorseman said:

 

 NCL and Royal Caribbean ships aren't USA flagged either, except for Pride of America. Both companies flag their ships in the Bahamas.

 

On a USA-based itinerary all ships, regardless of registry country, are required to make reasonable ADA accommodations for passengers, which I assume would include allowing service dogs. This is the result of a US Supreme Court ruling a number of years ago. 

I was aware of that, but perhaps MSC doesn't tolerate the emotional support animals as other cruise lines do. I've only seen on service dog for a blind person and everyone of course believes service dogs for real handicaps are legitimate and welcome.  

That said, MSC seems to have a huge number of preschoolers in strollers on their ships which I don't see very often on NCL ships. That's a different topic, of course. 

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