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MMDown Under

How are things where YOU are? (in relation to the Corona Virus)

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52 minutes ago, possum52 said:

 

Thanks for the hints for making stock. Perhaps my problem is we have a gas stove which as you say is difficult to get to a very low simmer. I will have another go though. 
 

Leigh, I use a stand-alone electric hot plate as I also have a gas stove. The one I have is a Breville and it's excellent. It wasn't very expensive but I can't see any of those for sale anymore. Breville now has induction ones which are more expensive but may be very good - I've never used an induction cooktop so don't know how it goes for slow cooking. It's certainly worthwhile buying an electric hotplate if you plan to make stock.

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55 minutes ago, MicCanberra said:

Easy put a rainbow bear (care bear)  in the window.

MicCanberra - I hadn't heard of bears in windows, however, after emptying the dogs toy box, I found a small yellow bear at the bottom.  He is now in pride of place on louvre in front window.  Do you know where this practice started.  

Leigh - what a lovely act of kindness for your DIL and grandchildren to walk around and wave from the footpath in front of your house.  

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44 minutes ago, OzKiwiJJ said:

This is the laptop app https://thejigsawpuzzles.com/

 

The mobile app is Jigsaw Puzzles, by Easybrain.com, with a red square and a yellow jigsaw piece as a logo.

 

Both are good.

 

Thanks for the info - I will check them out.

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25 minutes ago, OzKiwiJJ said:

Leigh, I use a stand-alone electric hot plate as I also have a gas stove. The one I have is a Breville and it's excellent. It wasn't very expensive but I can't see any of those for sale anymore. Breville now has induction ones which are more expensive but may be very good - I've never used an induction cooktop so don't know how it goes for slow cooking. It's certainly worthwhile buying an electric hotplate if you plan to make stock.

You can buy inexpensive double electric hotplates.  I have one.  Don't buy double electric hotplates on top of an oven, as I gave up after returning two of them.  The oven on its own is fine.  i also have a 2000 watt single Omega induction cooker Schott Ceran (any German speakers?), but you have to have induction saucepans/frypans for it.  Seeing I now have indefinite free time, I'll research it on the internet and see if I can get into + and - cooking.  I have lived in fear of these surfaces ever since I failed miserably to keep a similar surface clean enough in a swapped a house in Bavaria.  As my tourist German was very limited, I had already bought handwashing starch in lieu of hand washing liquid.  The picture was the same.  No wonder, I thought the smell was familiar.  Now be honest, how many of you use hand washing starch?  After that, I didn't want to risk buying any stove top cleaner.  And don't ask me about ironing sheets!  Nor bidets which look like toilets!  No toilet paper should have been a hint.  

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6 minutes ago, MMDown Under said:

You can buy inexpensive double electric hotplates.  I have one.  Don't buy double electric hotplates on top of an oven, as I gave up after returning two of them.  The oven on its own is fine.  i also have a 2000 watt single Omega induction cooker Schott Ceran (any German speakers?), but you have to have induction saucepans/frypans for it.  Seeing I now have indefinite free time, I'll research it on the internet and see if I can get into + and - cooking.  I have lived in fear of these surfaces ever since I failed miserably to keep a similar surface clean enough in a swapped a house in Bavaria.  As my tourist German was very limited, I had already bought handwashing starch in lieu of hand washing liquid.  The picture was the same.  No wonder, I thought the smell was familiar.  Now be honest, how many of you use hand washing starch?  After that, I didn't want to risk buying any stove top cleaner.  And don't ask me about ironing sheets!  Nor bidets which look like toilets!  No toilet paper should have been a hint.  

My son and DIL have just had a new house built: the kitchen has an induction cooktop. My DIL had bought expensive saucepans, but they are not steel, so she can't use them on the induction cooktop. My $25 set I bought on super special years ago would be OK - they are steel.😁 If you are not sure if your saucepans are suitable for an induction cooktop, see if a magnet will 'stick' to them (a fridge magnet would do).

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55 minutes ago, OzKiwiJJ said:

Leigh, I use a stand-alone electric hot plate as I also have a gas stove. The one I have is a Breville and it's excellent. It wasn't very expensive but I can't see any of those for sale anymore. Breville now has induction ones which are more expensive but may be very good - I've never used an induction cooktop so don't know how it goes for slow cooking. It's certainly worthwhile buying an electric hotplate if you plan to make stock.

Thanks OzKiwiJJ, I'll have to have a look. Have you evert tried to make it in a slow cooker?

 

Leigh

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39 minutes ago, MMDown Under said:

MicCanberra - I hadn't heard of bears in windows, however, after emptying the dogs toy box, I found a small yellow bear at the bottom.  He is now in pride of place on louvre in front window.  Do you know where this practice started.  

Leigh - what a lovely act of kindness for your DIL and grandchildren to walk around and wave from the footpath in front of your house.  

I do not know where I started but It was all over face book.

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1 hour ago, MMDown Under said:

Well done - sounds like a successful morning getting everything you needed.  No name brands for clothes and sneakers anymore, name brands for toilet paper is the new "in" thing. And you hit the jackpot.  Although I do prefer Aldi's double size rolls.  

oh dear, I'm not in your jigsaw puzzle class, I'm afraid.  My speciality was finding all the edges, then finding all the pieces with the same ins and outs, or just ins, you'll know what I mean.  Then I used to take one piece of puzzle to keep, so I could put the last piece of puzzle in to the finished masterpiece.  I had to stop that once they were all on to me!  For years after, if a piece of a puzzle was missing, they'd ask "do you have it, mum?"

We've had every kind of puzzle known to man over the years - all shapes and sizes up to 3,000 pieces (we had our limits), from no picture, to all the one shape (lost my job on that one), mystery ones, where you got to read a book at the same time, and ones you got to glue together at the end.  I don't know anyone who wants a puzzle on their wall, do you?  I used to buy some overseas, collapsing the boxes to remake at home.  (I was the family expert at that, although I don't think it was enough of a challenge for the others.)

I like the Quilton double length rolls, more space efficient for spare rolls.

 

You might like the phone app jigsaw puzzle. You scroll through all the pieces at the bottom of the window so can pick our all the edge pieces first, the match the rest by colour and/or shape. You can choose how many pieces you want for each puzzle so can do easy puzzles or harder ones depending on the number of pieces.

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15 minutes ago, possum52 said:

Thanks OzKiwiJJ, I'll have to have a look. Have you evert tried to make it in a slow cooker?

 

Leigh

My slow cooker isn't big enough for the quantities of stock I make at one time - my stock pot holds 12 litres! But I think it would work OK, you have to experiment with the settings. You'd need to use boiling water to start with though as slow cookers take for ever to heat big quantities of liquid. However that shouldn't be a problem. Just dump everything in with the boiling water. If you are using raw bones roast them for about 40 minutes at about 200C to get some caramelization on them, it gives a much better flavour. I save roast chicken carcasses for the next batch of stock but always add some fresh chicken frames, suitably roasted of course.

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4 minutes ago, OzKiwiJJ said:

My slow cooker isn't big enough for the quantities of stock I make at one time - my stock pot holds 12 litres! But I think it would work OK, you have to experiment with the settings. You'd need to use boiling water to start with though as slow cookers take for ever to heat big quantities of liquid. However that shouldn't be a problem. Just dump everything in with the boiling water. If you are using raw bones roast them for about 40 minutes at about 200C to get some caramelization on them, it gives a much better flavour. I save roast chicken carcasses for the next batch of stock but always add some fresh chicken frames, suitably roasted of course.

I have a smallish slow cooker but probably a good idea to experiment with small batches of stock to start. Thanks for your help OzKiwiJJ.

 

Leigh

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12 minutes ago, possum52 said:

I have a smallish slow cooker but probably a good idea to experiment with small batches of stock to start. Thanks for your help OzKiwiJJ.

 

Leigh

No worries. I make very simple stock - as many bones as I can comfortably fit in the pot, an onion quartered, a small carrot cut roughly in chunks, a stick of celery cut roughly in chunks, a sprig or two of parsley and some peppercorns, plus enough water to cover it all. I don't add salt. I don't use garlic as I have friends that are allergic to it, and I don't use strong flavoured herbs like bay leaves either. Those things can be added to the dishes you are using the stock in. I end up with a clean-flavoured stock that just tastes of whatever I've used for the base - chicken, beef. duck, turkey.

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32 minutes ago, possum52 said:

I have a smallish slow cooker but probably a good idea to experiment with small batches of stock to start. Thanks for your help OzKiwiJJ.

 

Leigh

Leigh I use my slow cooker all the time for stock. I have an oval large one. 

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3 minutes ago, cheznandy said:

Leigh I use my slow cooker all the time for stock. I have an oval large one. 

We used to as well Cheryl but swapped it for my daughter’s smaller one as she has two growing boys. 
 

I’ll have a go at making it soon. 
 

Leigh

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22 minutes ago, OzKiwiJJ said:

No worries. I make very simple stock - as many bones as I can comfortably fit in the pot, an onion quartered, a small carrot cut roughly in chunks, a stick of celery cut roughly in chunks, a sprig or two of parsley and some peppercorns, plus enough water to cover it all. I don't add salt. I don't use garlic as I have friends that are allergic to it, and I don't use strong flavoured herbs like bay leaves either. Those things can be added to the dishes you are using the stock in. I end up with a clean-flavoured stock that just tastes of whatever I've used for the base - chicken, beef. duck, turkey.

Thanks OzKiwiJJ, that sounds an easy recipe. 
 

Leigh

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46 minutes ago, OzKiwiJJ said:

My slow cooker isn't big enough for the quantities of stock I make at one time - my stock pot holds 12 litres! But I think it would work OK, you have to experiment with the settings. You'd need to use boiling water to start with though as slow cookers take for ever to heat big quantities of liquid. However that shouldn't be a problem. Just dump everything in with the boiling water. If you are using raw bones roast them for about 40 minutes at about 200C to get some caramelization on them, it gives a much better flavour. I save roast chicken carcasses for the next batch of stock but always add some fresh chicken frames, suitably roasted of course.

Agree most slow cookers aren't suitable for making stock, as they are too small.  However, once you make the stock and then reduce the stock, the remainder would fit in a slow cooker for the soup.

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27 minutes ago, OzKiwiJJ said:

No worries. I make very simple stock - as many bones as I can comfortably fit in the pot, an onion quartered, a small carrot cut roughly in chunks, a stick of celery cut roughly in chunks, a sprig or two of parsley and some peppercorns, plus enough water to cover it all. I don't add salt. I don't use garlic as I have friends that are allergic to it, and I don't use strong flavoured herbs like bay leaves either. Those things can be added to the dishes you are using the stock in. I end up with a clean-flavoured stock that just tastes of whatever I've used for the base - chicken, beef. duck, turkey.

This is an excellent example of a good stock.  If you don't have something in the house just double something else.  

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Posted (edited)

I have done the cooking in our house for decades, I like cooking, but have my limitations. I am a fan of ye olde slow cooker, curries, casseroles etc.  I am picking up some good tips on here from you 'Celebrity Chefs.'  Thank you. Keep it coming.🍷 The cook is allowed a couple of these whilst cooking.🍷

Edited by NSWP

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57 minutes ago, MMDown Under said:

This is an excellent example of a good stock.  If you don't have something in the house just double something else.  

I'd be a bit wary of doubling the amount of carrot, especially when making a small batch of stock. Carrot can add too much flavour if you're not careful and ruin the balance of the flavours of the stock.

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2 hours ago, MicCanberra said:

I do not know where I started but It was all over face book.

Thanks, my friends with young grandchildren would know. 

I like the Elf, who sits on the shelf prior to Christmas looking out for naughty children.  I sat next to a little girl, on a ferry, giving her grandmother instructions on minding the elf overnight. 

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21 minutes ago, OzKiwiJJ said:

I'd be a bit wary of doubling the amount of carrot, especially when making a small batch of stock. Carrot can add too much flavour if you're not careful and ruin the balance of the flavours of the stock.

I guess it depends on the size of the carrot.  I only buy small carrots which I grate to add to the dogs' meals. 

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44 minutes ago, NSWP said:

I have done the cooking in our house for decades, I like cooking, but have my limitations. I am a fan of ye olde slow cooker, curries, casseroles etc.  I am picking up some good tips on here from you 'Celebrity Chefs.'  Thank you. Keep it coming.🍷 The cook is allowed a couple of these whilst cooking.🍷

You'd be a good cook in the winter 

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4 hours ago, lyndarra said:

My son will have his test this afternoon at the local Laverty's blood letting office. Says it will be two days for results. He doesn't think it's the COVID-19 virus. Work is the only place he 'socialises' and he doesn't go out except shopping for necessities. To the best of his knowledge no one else from his work is exhibiting any symptoms. Just a wait and see for he and me.

Is that really its name?  It is a wonder they get anyone in the door.  

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44 minutes ago, MMDown Under said:

You'd be a good cook in the winter 

Thank you, I like to add a bit of paprika as well, not too early as the flavour can disappear.  Of course chilli powder/flakes are essential in some dishes.

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Just now, NSWP said:

Thank you, I like to add a bit of paprika as well, not too early as the flavour can disappear.  Of course chilli powder/flakes are essential in some dishes.

Agree flavour makes all the difference.  You can start with a little and add more each time.  I find spicy cruise food is not spicier enough.  The servers told me their food is better (Indian, etc.) than served in the Dining Room.  Lucky I've had lunch!

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Posted (edited)
3 minutes ago, MMDown Under said:

Agree flavour makes all the difference.  You can start with a little and add more each time.  I find spicy cruise food is not spicier enough.  The servers told me their food is better (Indian, etc.) than served in the Dining Room.  Lucky I've had lunch!

Have you been on the P&O UK ships ? We have been half a dozen cruises with them, Arcadia, Aurora, Oriana. Many of their staff are Indian, the cooks on P&O UK do some great curries and as you say the Indian servers take great delight in telling you in the buffet or MDR that their curries in the 'crew mess' are much better and would be too spicy and hot for me.😁 I believe them.

Edited by NSWP

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