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Adawn47

Fond Memories Of Your Youth.

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I was chatting with Brian on another thread and we mentioned our parents etc and I thought reminiscing about  our youth might make another interesting thread to relieve all the doom and gloom of the current situation. I'll start.

I was born in Staines Middlesex and can remember my Grandad working at the sawmill on Moor Lane. It's sadly all gone now to make way for the Staines bypass. I can also remember the town was a lovely place with old - fashioned grocers , butchers and fruit and vegetable shops that opened  out onto the pavement. We had a widowed neighbour, Mrs Tedder, who kept a goat as a pet. She used to walk it on a leash like a dog even into town. One day as she was walking near the fruit and vegetable shop the goat pulled away, dashed over the road and completely destroyed the outside arrangement of fruit and veg before he could be pulled off. Needless to say she was forbidden to taken him to town again. Could that have been the first ASBO?  Stay well. 

Avril 

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Have you been watching 'Back to the Corner Shop' on Sunday evening? When I was small I lived very near there.  I can remember my grandma taking me to the tripe shop, we used to take our own bottle to get it filled up with vinegar from a barrel. Also remember the herbalist shop where we bought sarspirella and licorice root sticks. 

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The world was a lot different then. We were content  with what little we had. I can remember the liquorice root sticks as well. We chewed them until they were a soggy mess. 

Avril 

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After the war, when rationing was tight, I remember my mum coming home, waving a tin and laughing: "I've got a tin of corned beef!".

I was remembering this when I tried filling in my Tesco delivery in our first self-distancing week, and there was little to buy... then I shouted: "Yes! I've got a tin of corned beef!". 😁

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I can still remember rationing. Going to the local shop with my sweet coupon clutched firmly in hand.

Avril 

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Posted (edited)

I remember our first house and remember thinking how lucky we was to have a bathroom at the top of our stairs.

Other side of the village was my auntie Clara's house with outside loo 40 yard or so down their back yard .

She had  the Sheffield star and Saturdays GREEN-UN cut up into squares hooked on as piece of wire and 

sat up on a shelf was a unused, or should I say unopened roll of IZAL loo roll ,think that was for any posh

company who may visit her.

Back in our house we had a big fire range with built in oven at the side. Pull the drawer lever out and the oven 

heated up like a Tandoori oven ,foods like Yorkshire puds  were cooked in about 20 mins .That fire place was 

Brilliant !

Trying to do a slice of toast ,holding it in front of the fire ,trying not to burn your hands or coming in 

on a cold day ,stood with your back to the fire, with your trouser legs now burning your legs as you

walked away from it.

Bed time was when my dear old Mam got the hot tray out of the oven  and wrapped it in a cotton bed sheet,

tucking it into my bed for five minutes to warm it up for me .

Going into the 70's my parents had it ripped out and a new fire was put in with full house central heating .

Toast and Yorkshire's were now banished to a new kitchen they had put in .

 

Nice memories " COME HOME TO A REAL FIRE" as the adverts used to say.

 

Great Thread Avril  :classic_smile:

 

Edited by kalos

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Thanks kalos. I thought returning to our memories of  the "good old days" might  cheer us up instead of dwelling on the present. Stay well. 

Avril

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When I think about that Izal toilet roll it makes me laugh. It was shiny on one side and I never knew which side to use. I used to scrunch it up to try to make it a bit softer but it still felt like sandpaper. 😂.

Avril 

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Kalos- we had a range like that- it was called a Yorkshire Range... and yes, parents did the same- a horrible tiled fireplace and the house never felt warm after that... no central heating for years.

Visited a house in the 90s, where a trendy colleague lived, to see her latest find- they'd just installed a Yorkshire Range! 🤣

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It's amazing how things come back into fashion. There's nothing more comforting than an open fire. During winter mum used to keep a brick in the back oven to get hot and then wrap it in an old towel for me to take to bed. In the morning it was so cold the windows were covered with frost ferns. 

Avril 

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Posted (edited)
12 hours ago, jocap said:

Visited a house in the 90s, where a trendy colleague lived, to see her latest find- they'd just installed a Yorkshire Range! 🤣

 

11 hours ago, Adawn47 said:

It's amazing how things come back into fashion.

 

In the room with the fire range was a utility sink which when taken out I had in the back garden to keep my frog spawn and stickle back fish I'd caught from the local pond.

When no longer in use it was smashed up and put in the bin .

Years later walking around a garden centre I came across a white pot utility sink the same as what we'd had.

Looking at the price tag I nearly fell through the floor at the price they were asking for it.

Price I do not remember but I do remember wishing we had not put ours in the bin.:classic_sad: :classic_wink:

Edited by kalos

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On 3/30/2020 at 10:14 PM, dronnygirl said:

Have you been watching 'Back to the Corner Shop' on Sunday evening? When I was small I lived very near there.  I can remember my grandma taking me to the tripe shop, we used to take our own bottle to get it filled up with vinegar from a barrel. Also remember the herbalist shop where we bought sarspirella and licorice root sticks. 

I remember the very distinct and pungent smell of tripe being cooked in a big pot for hours and hours, it clung to everything.

 


 

 

 

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I was talking with Mrs Kalos about this thread,love the stories .
We got talking about how hard it is to try and book a delivery slot with the big supermarkets.
It got us thinking back to how a lot of shops and firms had their own mobile shops.
The one I remember was 'Lacey's' mobile shop. I think he visited us once a week.

He had a big van with a proper counter and a lovely selection of sweets as I remember as a kid.
We had a butchers van,green grocer van ,ice cream vans and a rag and bone man .
The latter used to give us a balloon in exchange for a hand-full of old clothes.
We had a guy with his van Davenports Beer At Home but he didn't last long  as we had plenty of

pubs and clubs nearby .
A  lorry once weekly pop company was Haigh's, at that time run by the father of politician William Haigh

various selections of flavours in the large glass "Pop Bottles"
Not forgetting the Northern Dairy's milk float ,Dale Farm and a local milk float as well.
Moving into  70's  Haigh's pop was no more and was replaced with Alpine pop which 
I drove for a year and i could drink as much pop as i wanted but I have never been a 
fan of cheap pop anyway.
Happy days really step out of the house and the shops came to you ...
Without delivery slots.

All you had to do was set your clock by them if you wanted to use them .

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22 hours ago, Adawn47 said:

It's amazing how things come back into fashion. There's nothing more comforting than an open fire. During winter mum used to keep a brick in the back oven to get hot and then wrap it in an old towel for me to take to bed. In the morning it was so cold the windows were covered with frost ferns. 

Avril 

I remember the frozen windows, we used to have a paraffin lamp in the loo to stop it freezing up!  In 1963 I was little and we were frozen up for 3 weeks in the big freeze, we had to have buckets of water from neighbours.  

Nowadays we see floods due to the warmer wet weather!

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Ben Shaw's dandelion and burdock for us- was that Halifax? And dad liked his Tetley bitter... And Sheffield stout!... that was black "beer" mixed with lemonade- the miners drank it, because it looked like real beer in the glass. 

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We weren't posh enough to have a fridge so mum kept meat in a metal meat safe in the cellar and kept milk fresh in a bucket of cold water on  the cellar top. I loved going to grocers with her. Sugar weighed out in blue bags, butter cut off a huge slab and wrapped in paper. With mum being a Southerner and shopping in Yorkshire it caused a few laughs. In the butchers she asked for 1lb of chipolatas. 'What?' Said the woman. So mum said it again. 'Ent got none' She said. So mum pointed and said a 'lb of those'  'Oh.' She said 'you mean links o' thin' I've never forgotten that. It's funny the silly little things you remember. 

Avril

 

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10 hours ago, jocap said:

Ben Shaw's dandelion and burdock for us- was that Halifax?

No, it was Huddersfield. I had a summer job there in the summer of '76 when they ramped up production. They had me using a forklift to stack crates of lemonade. Mostly it was easy enough but I was always very careful not to break anything and got into the way of stacking the crates without them even rattling - just meant I was a bit slower than the old timers. 

 

One of them took me to one side and said:

 

'Get a move on - you don't need the touch of a f***ing midwife, you know!' 

 

Still not sure exactly what that means but it still makes me smile. 

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13 hours ago, Eglesbrech said:

I remember the very distinct and pungent smell of tripe being cooked in a big pot for hours and hours, it clung to everything.

 


 

 

 

LOL,they still sell it here.They mix it with nduja and various things.I had it as a starter once,just to try it.I've had worse.

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10 hours ago, Adawn47 said:

We weren't posh enough to have a fridge so mum kept meat in a metal meat safe in the cellar and kept milk fresh in a bucket of cold water on  the cellar top. I loved going to grocers with her. Sugar weighed out in blue bags, butter cut off a huge slab and wrapped in paper. With mum being a Southerner and shopping in Yorkshire it caused a few laughs. In the butchers she asked for 1lb of chipolatas. 'What?' Said the woman. So mum said it again. 'Ent got none' She said. So mum pointed and said a 'lb of those'  'Oh.' She said 'you mean links o' thin' I've never forgotten that. It's funny the silly little things you remember. 

Avril

 

LOL,reading some stories,I must be one of the babies here (67).We moved from a council flat in East London to a "modern" council house in Dagenham in the 50's.We had a state of the art gas copper in the kitchen with a hand pump to get the water into the bath upstairs,it also doubled up as the washing machine with the mangle attached.After my Dad died I found it in the loft.Being a plumber,I sold it for 30quid at the scrap yard.We couldn't afford a fridge either,I remember the milk in a bucket of water on the doorstep.Bloody loooxery.

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When we were newly weds in 1965 we were lucky enough to get our first house with the help of family. A 2 up 2 down with outside toilet and a tin bath hanging on the outside wall. We were both teenagers 18 &19 years old and felt like we owned the world. We had an old grey enamel gas cooker and a gas water heater over the sink. No fridge but I had this amazing electric washer. A big square tub that I had to fill with buckets of hot water, and  a paddle in the middle that swished the clothes about. It also had an attached electric mangle. It was basic living, but were we happy? You bet we were and still are after 55 years. He's got real staying power that chap of mine.😉

Avril 

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I know it's easy to get nostalgic but how many would now live as they did 50 years ago?  Tin Bath, Smog, Polio, no TV, no central heating, unimaginative food, measles, mumps, rubella, cars engineered to break down every 10 minutes, everyone smoking. Oh I could go on. OK, I will. Precious little hope for children from working class families, women as men's possessions, Anaglypta wallpaper, beating carpets in the spring, coal fires, travelling to the adjacent county was exotic, rickets etc. 

 

What fun we had! 

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37 minutes ago, Adawn47 said:

He's got real staying power that chap of mine.😉

 

Too much info Avril :classic_blush::classic_blush::classic_blush: Behave yourself ! :classic_smile::classic_smile::classic_wink:

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1 hour ago, kalos said:

 

Too much info Avril :classic_blush::classic_blush::classic_blush: Behave yourself ! :classic_smile::classic_smile::classic_wink:

Naughty kalos, you knew I meant for putting up with me. 😜 

Avril 

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1 hour ago, Tothesunset said:

I know it's easy to get nostalgic but how many would now live as they did 50 years ago?  Tin Bath, Smog, Polio, no TV, no central heating, unimaginative food, measles, mumps, rubella, cars engineered to break down every 10 minutes, everyone smoking. Oh I could go on. OK, I will. Precious little hope for children from working class families, women as men's possessions, Anaglypta wallpaper, beating carpets in the spring, coal fires, travelling to the adjacent county was exotic, rickets etc. 

 

What fun we had! 

No one would want to go back to those times, but then it was all you knew. So you accepted the good parts, and coped with the not so good. What you never had you never missed. Its not that much different than it is today. Now we have covid 19, and having more modern "stuff" doesn't help. We're not having much fun now either. Just still coping. Stay well. 

Avril 

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I must say, one of my earliest happy memories was when the Ormeau Bakery van would stop outside my Grandmother's house in Belfast and I was allowed to choose an iced bun which my memory tells me was about the size of a hub cap.

 

She'd also give me a thruppenny bit on Saturday morning so I could wander down the Shankill road to the newsagent and buy whatever diabetes-inducing sweetmeats took my fancy. As you can tell, an Irish diet isn't always the most nourishing! 

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