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rkacruiser

Delta is retiring some planes.

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I read today that Delta is retiring their 777, the MD-88, and the MD-90 planes.  I am sorry to learn that about the 777 because I have found it to be a very comfortable plane.  Since their DAY-ATL service has used the MD-88 and MD-90 planes in the past, I wonder what equipment they will now assign to that route.  I am afraid it will be another small jet.   I may be incorrect, but I think the MD planes were the only larger jet that was providing service for DAY any more.   

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The 777 was a small sub-fleet, with only 18 airframes.  DL has decided that their future long-haul fleet will be a mix of the A330, both in classic and NEO versions, along with the A350 which they deem their fleet's flagship.  767s will be the next long-haul to be retired - AA has announced that for their 767s.  In general, there has been much positive buzz on the A350, both from passengers and from the operation side.  In business, the Delta One Suites is a huge leap up from the old 777 herringbone design.

 

The MadDogs were always going to be leaving the fleet -- this shutdown just accelerated the process.  Even the 90s are fairly long in the tooth.  I would expect that you would get replacement in the form of the A220 (formerly known as the Bombardier C-Series), which has also been getting passenger raves.  Some frequencies might even get 737 service.

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23 hours ago, FlyerTalker said:

I would expect that you would get replacement in the form of the A220 (formerly known as the Bombardier C-Series), which has also been getting passenger raves

 

Looking at information about this plane, it appears to be a decent replacement for the service that I expect DAY will experience.  

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I really hate to see the 2/3 seating go.  The more A220s as replacements for the MadDogs the better.

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On 5/18/2020 at 8:18 PM, ericosmith said:

I really hate to see the 2/3 seating go.  The more A220s as replacements for the MadDogs the better.

 

The A220 are a step up from the MadDogs.   They are the most advanced single aisle aircraft on the market with bigger windows, enough overhead space for everyone to have a full compliant of carry on baggage.  

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20 hours ago, em-sk said:

 

The A220 are a step up from the MadDogs...

 

I used to fly the MD 80 every week and I really don't miss seeing them go.  I remember then cruising a bit slower - I think - than other aircraft.  This cruising speed resulted in  some horrendously long flights from ORD to SAN during the winter going against the wind.  Perhaps those winter flights simply jade my memory of the aircraft.

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1 hour ago, SelectSys said:

 

I used to fly the MD 80 every week and I really don't miss seeing them go.  I remember then cruising a bit slower - I think - than other aircraft.  This cruising speed resulted in  some horrendously long flights from ORD to SAN during the winter going against the wind.  Perhaps those winter flights simply jade my memory of the aircraft.

No slower at altitude by much, if any, compared to other airliners. It was probably due to a 200-300 knot headwind because of the time of year it was, so it would have been slower on any jet. Most airliners fly between Mach .76 and .78 with a few, e.g. 747 around .80 or .81. Of course, the max ceiling on a MD is FL370 as opposed to FL430 or FL450 like some newer ones, so they could not fly as high either.

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22 hours ago, em-sk said:

The A220 are a step up from the MadDogs.   They are the most advanced single aisle aircraft on the market with bigger windows, enough overhead space for everyone to have a full compliant of carry on baggage.  

 

 

Today, there was a major fire in the Bombardier facility in Belfast, where the A220 wings are assembled.  Who knows what that means for the long-term future for the program.

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On 5/24/2020 at 7:30 PM, FlyerTalker said:

 

 

Today, there was a major fire in the Bombardier facility in Belfast, where the A220 wings are assembled.  Who knows what that means for the long-term future for the program.

 

Sounds like there will be no impact.  

 

https://www.flightglobal.com/aerospace/bombardier-expects-minimal-impact-from-belfast-plant-fire/138516.article

 

I find it weird  the wings are made in Northern Ireland and then shipped to Montreal to be connected to the rest of the aircraft. 

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1 hour ago, em-sk said:

I find it weird  the wings are made in Northern Ireland and then shipped to Montreal to be connected to the rest of the aircraft. 

 

If you want to see a real jigsaw puzzle plane, look at the 787.  Wing assemblies from Japan, fuselage sections from Italy and much much more.  Here's an excellent article, and a cool graphic, showing the various sources for 787 assemblies.

 

https://www.aeronewstv.com/en/industry/commercial-aviation/3707-boeing-787-dreamliner-structure-parts-from-around-the-globe.html

 

 

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On 5/24/2020 at 7:11 PM, zdcatc12 said:

No slower at altitude by much, if any, compared to other airliners. It was probably due to a 200-300 knot headwind because of the time of year it was, so it would have been slower on any jet. Most airliners fly between Mach .76 and .78 with a few, e.g. 747 around .80 or .81. Of course, the max ceiling on a MD is FL370 as opposed to FL430 or FL450 like some newer ones, so they could not fly as high either.

 

For sure the wind was a huge part of the slowness.  My theme song for those flights was Bob Seger's, "Against the Wind."  My memory is that the MD80 was the slowest of all AA's jets at the time as listed in the "American Way"  magazine and this contributed to my impatience of wanting to get home.   Maybe the Fokker 100 was slightly slower.  

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18 hours ago, SelectSys said:

 

For sure the wind was a huge part of the slowness.  My theme song for those flights was Bob Seger's, "Against the Wind."  My memory is that the MD80 was the slowest of all AA's jets at the time as listed in the "American Way"  magazine and this contributed to my impatience of wanting to get home.   Maybe the Fokker 100 was slightly slower.  

Yes, the Fokker would have been slower and the Classic 737s, i.e. 300/400/500, though AA never flew those, about the same as the MD80s. The slowest jet used by airlines, though there were hardly any produced, was the J328, basically a D328 with jet engines, but the same wing. I believe their cruise was around .70.

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There was one version of a MD 80 plane in which I flew that had a galley on the left side of the plane, near the rear if I remember correctly, that took up space that could have seated passengers if it was not located there.  I had a seat on the right side opposite the galley and got prompt service for another beverage, etc.  I wondered then--and do still--why was such a design ever produced?

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53 minutes ago, rkacruiser said:

There was one version of a MD 80 plane in which I flew that had a galley on the left side of the plane, near the rear if I remember correctly, that took up space that could have seated passengers if it was not located there.  I had a seat on the right side opposite the galley and got prompt service for another beverage, etc.  I wondered then--and do still--why was such a design ever produced?

 

The galley was at the location of the aft left door, so it was convenient for catering.  As the size of the aircraft increased, the need for additional galley space was required - remember, these were designed in days when meals and beverage service was greater than what you find today - the 80s started service in 1980.

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2 hours ago, FlyerTalker said:

 

The galley was at the location of the aft left door, so it was convenient for catering.  As the size of the aircraft increased, the need for additional galley space was required - remember, these were designed in days when meals and beverage service was greater than what you find today - the 80s started service in 1980.

 

I did not realize that it was at that aft left door.  It was such an odd configuration for an aircraft on which I have flown that it has remained memorable.  

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