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Rule of 6 will apply to indoor hospitality no masks, will this also apply to ships


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After May 17th in UK when hospitality reopens indoors , rule of six will apply with no masks, will UK based ships be allowed to follow suit. A step towards normality.

 

Similiary from June 21st if all social distancing is not required on land will cruises follow suit.

 

 

 

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No because CDC may insist upon masks for life. Also consider the impact of a lawsuit for getting Covid like with the all inclusive in Egypt. (You claim for touching the pool with your arm and you win) Masks are THE ONLY WAY to prevent outbreak IMHO.

 

Have they said whether quarantine requirements would be lifted? The hotel quarantine probably costs more than the QM2 cruise you know.

Edited by ace2542
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9 hours ago, ace2542 said:

No because CDC may insist upon masks for life. Also consider the impact of a lawsuit for getting Covid like with the all inclusive in Egypt. (You claim for touching the pool with your arm and you win) Masks are THE ONLY WAY to prevent outbreak IMHO.

 

Have they said whether quarantine requirements would be lifted? The hotel quarantine probably costs more than the QM2 cruise you know.

Provided ships don't dock at a US port, or enter US waters, the CDC has no jurisdiction.

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7 hours ago, Heidi13 said:

Provided ships don't dock at a US port, or enter US waters, the CDC has no jurisdiction.

Does that also include the so called what is it "continuous territory area of U.S immigration control" - that is the technical term isn't it -. You are not considered to have left the USA until you travel pretty far correct? And isn't that area the entire Caribbean, Canada, Mexico and even all the way to Ireland or close to Iceland isn't it?

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1 hour ago, ace2542 said:

Does that also include the so called what is it "continuous territory area of U.S immigration control" - that is the technical term isn't it -. You are not considered to have left the USA until you travel pretty far correct? And isn't that area the entire Caribbean, Canada, Mexico and even all the way to Ireland or close to Iceland isn't it?

Interesting question.  When we visited Iceland we went to a point where on one side we were standing on the North American plate and on the other side it was the Eurasian plate.

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1 minute ago, babs135 said:

Interesting question.  When we visited Iceland we went to a point where on one side we were standing on the North American plate and on the other side it was the Eurasian plate.

I don't know about Iceland but you have to go pretty far to be considered to have "left the USA". It is a law school exam question as to whether a person on the 90th day of Visa Waiver (you get 90 days)can be considered to have overstayed if in that area. Or the correctness of instructing a plane carrying a wanted person to turn back the USA as opposed to attempting to extradite.

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2 hours ago, ace2542 said:

Does that also include the so called what is it "continuous territory area of U.S immigration control" - that is the technical term isn't it -. You are not considered to have left the USA until you travel pretty far correct? And isn't that area the entire Caribbean, Canada, Mexico and even all the way to Ireland or close to Iceland isn't it?

 

In the CDC Order, the definition of cruise ship is a pax v/l operating in US Waters. As per UNCLOS (UN Convention of Laws of the Seas), the territorial waters can be out to 12 miles offshore.

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1 hour ago, ace2542 said:

I don't know about Iceland but you have to go pretty far to be considered to have "left the USA". It is a law school exam question as to whether a person on the 90th day of Visa Waiver (you get 90 days)can be considered to have overstayed if in that area. Or the correctness of instructing a plane carrying a wanted person to turn back the USA as opposed to attempting to extradite.

 

Yes, they have some strangle Visa expectations. If we are in the USA for over a months and return to Canada, but then return to the USA after less than a month at home, they can consider for Visa purposes that we didn't leave.

 

Although we physically departed and were no longer subject to US Laws, we could have to count our days in Canada, as being days in the USA.

 

If in the US for over a month and we leave on a R/T cruise from a US port, although physically outside the USA, those days can also count towards our maximum number of days permitted in the USA. However, once outside US Waters, we are no longer subject to their laws.

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