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seabourndt

been on hurtigruten?

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We (wife and I) are on Nordkapp (Bergen-Kirkenes-Bergen) October 14. Been on my bucket list for some time, and really looking forward to it. Has anyone been that time of year? Kruizefan, I'm looking forward to seeing what you have to say about the ship itself.

Jim

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I have cruised with Hurtigruten three times, twice for the Norwegian Coastal Voyage (and once in Antarctica with M/S Fram).

 

Can you tell me about your Antarctica trip? I am considering the M/S Fram in 2013 or 2014. I'm concerned about Drake's Passage, and since the M/S Fram has stabilizers, I thought it might be an easier passage than some of the 100 passenger boats.

 

Thanks!

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Can you tell me about your Antarctica trip? I am considering the M/S Fram in 2013 or 2014. I'm concerned about Drake's Passage, and since the M/S Fram has stabilizers, I thought it might be an easier passage than some of the 100 passenger boats.

 

My Antarctica trip was wonderful! ;) MS Fram is a great ship, and has a great expedition team on board, which takes pride in making sure that the passengers have the best possible Antarctica experience.

Our Drake crossing was actually pretty good (Drake Lake on the way to Antarctica, stronger wind but not awful on the way back). But surely, with her stabilizers, she's a ship well equiped to handle bad weather.

 

You can check in the "Antarctica" section in the "Port of call" board, and you will find other passengers' experience with MS Fram. Check also, if you haven't already, the ship's blog. There are some description of the ship in real bad weather. I know it's a "commercial" blog and they will not tell you bad things about the ship, but overall I have a feeling of safety with this ship.

 

I also very much appreciated that MS Fram has an ice-resistant hull. She's no icebreaker, but she can be led through floating ice passages.

For instance, I'm not sure the passage through the Gullet could have been possible with another ship (I apologize, my blog is in French only, but there is little text and mostly pictures):

http://voyageterremer.blogspot.com/2011/02/au-sud-du-sud-jour-7-gullet.html

Or also this day:

http://voyageterremer.blogspot.com/2011/02/au-sud-du-sud-jour-8-fish-island.html

 

Don't let the thought of the Drake passage stop you from your Antarctica trip. I know there have been a few accidents, but the likelihood is pretty high that you will make it safely on the other side. There are hundreds of crossing each year that go well. Getting a ship with stabilizers probably increase that likelihood, and also will make the movements of the ship more gentle, reducing the risks of seasickness. And Antarctica is really, really worth it (some might even tell you that the Drake crossing is part of the experience! ;) ).

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Just back from Fram's final Antarctica trip of the season. Amazing, fantastic experience. The Drake Passage was calm, Southern Ocean was calm but...second day out of Falkland Islands heading north for Buenos Aires we hit hurricane force winds, Beaufort 12, waves 15+ meters for most of the day. Yes, the ship was rocking and rolling but it felt totally safe...may have helped that the winds were coming form behind us. Interesting experience being in the restaurant on Deck 4 and watching out the windows at the waves 20 feet above where you were. Would go on Fram again in a second with no hesitations. Will post a review in the next week or two.

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Kruizefan, I'm looking forward to seeing what you have to say about the ship itself.

Jim

 

We had a great cruise but the weather hasn´t been as cold as I had expected.

Even north of the polar circle it wasn´t frosty but just in Kirkenes.

 

The ship is o.k. as the newer ships are, not as fancy as Trollfjord and Midnatsol.

The cabins are small (without a TV set), I was happy not being with my wife.

 

If the ship runs on full capacity it will be too crowded.

The restaurant and lobbies are way too small.

Don´t take a cabin near the bow as you will be awoken by the thrusters every night.

It´s free WiFi onboard.

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I apologize, my blog is in French only, but there is little text and mostly pictures):

http://voyageterremer.blogspot.com/2011/02/au-sud-du-sud-jour-7-gullet.html

Or also this day:

http://voyageterremer.blogspot.com/2011/02/au-sud-du-sud-jour-8-fish-island.html

 

Thanks for the information - I have been searching Cruise Critic and several other sites for information - I just the love the internet. I'm pretty sure we will go on the Fram - the dates. itinerary, price, stabilizers, and reviews have convinced me it's a good choice. It doesn't seem like going on land in shifts is much of a problem.

 

And your pictures are fantastic - thanks for sharing. I used Google Translate to convert your text into English, so the French was no problem.

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always wanted to try this line, anyone been on trollfjord is she a good ship?

dave

Hurtigruten is a great cruise line. We did the whole 12 days back to Bergen. Wonderful experience. However, we would suggest to book on the Midnatsol, a newer ship that we were on beginning September, the last trip to see the Geiranger Fjord. Unbelievable scenery.

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We were on the Fram last year on a "special voyage" that started in Dover, England, then to Norway up to Bergen, then back to Oslo. She's a lovely ship, and we were never bored.

 

We're packing now for our next trip, this time on the Nordnorge, going from Bergen to Kirkenes, then back to Trondheim, where we'll get off the ship and take the train to Oslo.

 

Indeed, the Hurtigruten cruises are not entertainment oriented -- if by "entertainment" you mean bingo, shows, art auctions, hairy chest contests, all that sort of stuff that occurs on the main-line cruise ships! Entertainment Hurtigruten-style is the breathtaking scenery all around you, the activity of the working ship (these ARE ferries, after all..picking people and goods up and dropping them off at other ports, even in the middle of the night), occasional lectures that cover history, geography, sometimes excursions offered (if the stops are long enough for passengers to take any!). No "shopping lectures".

 

And the cabins are spare by main-line cruise standards..small, but ours had a small refrigerator, shower and shampoos, bath linens were changed daily, cots made up daily, plenty of storage.

 

The food is typical Norwegian food -- plenty of it, lots of fish made in all sorts of creative ways (except, somewhat surprising to us!, not fried), lots of vegetables, fruit, boiled potatoes. When you go on a long voyage like we are, I'd suggest you buy the meals as part of your package. Again, unlike main-line cruise ships, the dining room is only open during set times (no 24 hour buffet), but on the larger ships (like the Nordnorge) there is a cafe open some hours, too.

 

We took books and I took some embroidery...got a little done, but really more done on the flights over and back than on the ship itself!

 

Anyway, we love the line, and hope this upcoming voyage won't be our last!

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However, we would suggest to book on the Midnatsol, a newer ship

 

Trollfjord and Midnatsol are sister ships. Except for their colors (Trollfjord being the "winter ship", decorated in blue/green colors) they are fairly similar. Trollfjord is a year older than Midnatsol, which really does not make a big difference. When chosing between those two it boils down to what color scheme you prefere (if any) and the sailing date.

 

We traveled on Trollfjord for its 2008 Christmas voyage (round trip) and loved it. Very friendly crew, wonderful scenery, nice mini-suite, good food, nice people (less than 10 round-trip passangers though many people came onboard in Kirkenes, including family members of the staff, which gave a wonderful atmosphere), very informal, very quiet and relaxing.

 

We hope to take another Hurtigruten "cruise" next March. And will possibly go for the Nordnorge or the Richard With.

 

Thing is, it's not a "cruise". No bingo, no shows, no auctions, no contests (except for guessing what time the ship will cross the arctic circle), very few lectures (on regular round trips) but it's lovely if you take it for the atmosphere, the scenery, the excursions (some of them are amazing) and for relaxtion. You just have to know what you are getting into, if you expected a cruise as you can experience on the major cruise lines in the mediterranen or the caribic you'd most possibly be disappointed. And the average age among round-trip passangers (excluding people traveling from port to port) is 60+. We were in our late 20s on our first trip and by far the youngest. But we loved it, still!

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After researching the Fram for an Antarctica cruise, I'm thinking of also doing a winter Norway coastal cruise with Hurtigruten in Dec 2012/Jan2013 (Bergen to Kirkenes, then back to Trondheim and to Oslo by train). Any recommendations? Thoughts?

 

I've been on the Hurtigruten web site and searched Cruise Critic boards and the internet - looks like some of you have done this cruise and thought I'd ask what were the highlights for you and if you have any advice. I took a two+ week car/ferry/air trip from Oslo as far north as the Lofoten Islands two summers ago, and am seriously considering a winter trip by boat. I'd love to see the northern lights.

 

Thanks!

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After researching the Fram for an Antarctica cruise, I'm thinking of also doing a winter Norway coastal cruise with Hurtigruten in Dec 2012/Jan2013 (Bergen to Kirkenes, then back to Trondheim and to Oslo by train). Any recommendations? Thoughts?

My recommandation is : go for it! ;)

I have done that trip over last Christmas holidays and it was absolutely wonderful. We saw the northern lights five nights in a row, and we were also quite (pleasantly) surprised by the lights and colors you can see during the "day".

 

While on board, I have written a blog for this journey, again I apologize it's in French only (but you said you can google-translate it ;) ) and I hope the pictures speak for themselves about how magical this journey was. It starts here:

http://voyageterremer.blogspot.com/2010/12/bergen.html

(and click on "message plus recent" at the bottom of the page for the following days).

 

It was nice to be onboard for the holidays with a special Christmas spirit, but the ships are more crowded at this time of year. We were onboard the MS Polarlys, and there were about 300 passengers for the Christmas journey, but for the following trip there were only 35 passengers, and I'm sure they were spoiled by the crew! ;) I'm surprised to read Piggeldy's experience of only 10 round-trip passengers for a Christmas journey, lucky you! I think that Hurtigruten is starting to fully advertise its winter voyage and there are more people now during this season.

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My recommandation is : go for it! ;)

While on board, I have written a blog for this journey, again I apologize it's in French only (but you said you can google-translate it ;) ) and I hope the pictures speak for themselves about how magical this journey was. It starts here:

http://voyageterremer.blogspot.com/2010/12/bergen.html

(and click on "message plus recent" at the bottom of the page for the following days).

 

Thanks so much for the link - I used google translate, so I could read what you wrote in English. Your pictures and narrative really helped. I am excited and will try to do the winter trip. My husband hates the cold, so I hope he will go with me! Your pictures will help since seeing the northern lights is on his bucket list!

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I'm surprised to read Piggeldy's experience of only 10 round-trip passengers for a Christmas journey, lucky you! I think that Hurtigruten is starting to fully advertise its winter voyage and there are more people now during this season.

 

That!

From what I have read there have been more and more people on the winter voyages the last couple of years. Back in 2008 we were really really lucky! I think we were 7 (or 9?) German round-trip passengers and that was it. All other passengers boarded the ship halfway in Kirkenes (for the christmassy half of the voyage) and the crew's families came on board wherever it suited them best, I guess.

 

We only had one dinner seating throughout the whole voyage and I don't think the restaurant was ever more than half full. The panorama lounge was pretty much empty (except for the last day) as were the outside areas. We were only a hand full of people on our excursion to the North Cape (all 7 or 9 of us round-trip passengers). It was really special. Very cozy. Eventhough we had 3°C (37°F) and rain for most of the voyage - except for Kirkenes were we experienced -10°C (14°F).

 

I'm thinking of also doing a winter Norway coastal cruise with Hurtigruten in Dec 2012/Jan2013 (Bergen to Kirkenes, then back to Trondheim and to Oslo by train). Any recommendations? Thoughts?

 

Remember that there will be very little light. The sun rises late (where it rises at all) and sets early. The light is wonderful, however.

 

1-d3c83e8a576d6bd85318f3e1689ca9e7.jpg

 

This spring has been overwhelmed with winter storms. Some ships didn't even get all the way up to Kirkenes and a bus was blown off the road during an excursion to the north cape. In 2008, we were not able to stop for at least three ports on our southbound voyage due to strong winds.

 

In some ports there is not much to do.

 

This for example is the port in Kirkenes:

?action=view&current=1-b72fe74cc2cbe2bb136adf0489c2451a.jpg1-b72fe74cc2cbe2bb136adf0489c2451a.jpg

 

If one can't make it to the city on foot, there is not much to do. But there are nice excursions one can take in Kirkenes (snowmobile safari, husky adventure, Russian boarder, snow hotel), we just went to the store down the road and then spend some time in the jacuzzi.

 

The excursions are rather expensive. But then so is Norway on the whole.

 

Plus, people will think you are crazy. Asking you why you'd travel to northern Norway in winter. When it is dark. And not in the summer.

 

I'd love to see the northern lights.

 

We saw one. Well, I saw one. DH was under the shower and as our first northern light, which was announced during dinner, had vanished when we had made our way upstairs, he didn't bother rushing. And missed 20 minutes of the only northern light to be seen. It was special but not as impressive as many of the pictures that can be found on the net. More like a very light green cloud.

 

1-019af8b329b648a67c1ec3232a35c595.jpg

 

If you fly in and out of Oslo, make sure to take the Bergen railway (Oslo - Bergen) during the day, do not take a night train... the view is amazing! Same goes for the train Trondheim - Oslo, though that is easier as the ship docks in Trondheim early in the morning.

 

If you organize your journey to Bergen and from Trondheim to Oslo independently make sure to include overnight stays. The weather is unpredictable. Rather safe than sorry...

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Thanks Piggeldy - great information. We have friends in Oslo, so I'm hoping they will join us on the cruise, although they may be one of the ones who think we're crazy to do it in the winter. Either way, I'm sure we'll visit with them a few days; may even spend some time in Trondheim where they have relatives. Depends on how much time I can take off.

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We love Oslo...one of our "favorite cities of the world"! We got stuck there last year -- y'all remember the volcano that erupted in Iceland, closing European airports. We were in Oslo at the time, just extended our stay by 5 days...and enjoyed every one of them! This was in April, though.. not midwinter.. When we booked to go to Norway again this year, we added on a week in Oslo at the end. We're real excited!

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We are booked on the ms trollfjord on july 30,2011 kirkenes to bergen and take the train to oslo cant wait

 

stur dayton,ohio

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Hi Carmelita --

If you check back on this thread -- did you ever write any more about your recent trip on the Fram?

 

We'll be on her doing the Antarctic Discovery next January and I'd love to hear more about what to pack. From what I've read it seems the boots and jacket they have are adequate -- I shouldn't need my own parka, just a fleece jacket. Does that seem accurate to you?

 

Did you take any of those chemical footwarmer pads? Or just a couple layers of socks? Do you wear the boots on every landing -- I guess there are none where you would need hiking boots of your own, right? Will I be ok just bringing running shoes to wear on the ship?

 

It sounds like they keep the heat turned up on the ship so we won't need tons of clothes - i think some people even recommended short sleeve shirts since it's so warm inside.

 

I have tons of questions but I won't overdo it -- but if you check back or anyone else can advise I'd appreciate any words of wisdom.

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I was on MS Fram in Antarctica in February 2009 so maybe I can answer some of your questions.

For clothing, remember that layering is the key. You can have any type of weather from quite mild to windy and bitterly cold. The jacket they give is relatively OK for windproofing but it is not warm at all so make sure you have enough layers to keep warm under it in different kind of weather (thermal underwar and at least one fleece top underneath your fleece jacket and the Fram's jacket on top is a good base).

I haven't tried the footwarmer pads. Layering of socks is a good idea (make sure that your socks are not too tight because you will get cold if the blood flow is restricted).

For landings, I think you have to use the boots they provide, unless you have special requirement for your shoes, . These boots will be disinfected before and after landing (with water and some disinfecting chemical) so if you must take your own boots, make sure they will stand that treatment. High waterproof boots are necessary for landings, since most of the time you exit the polarcirkel boats in shallow water.

 

To wear on the ship, running shoes or light hiking shoes are OK. Remember that between landings (when you are on the ship) you will still spend a lot of time outside to enjoy the scenery. I don't remember the temperature to be that warm inside, it is confortable but not overly hot (of course, compared to the outside, it is much warmer!).

 

And bring your swimming gear as well. If you are really brave, you can take a (very quick) dip in the Antarctic sea (for instance at Deception Island where the water is warmed by volcano fumes), or you can use the outside hot tubs on the ship.

 

If you have other questions I'll be happy to try and answer them, this trip was probably the most wonderful of my life.

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Hi SarniaLo -

Thanks so much for your reply - it's very helpful. Since I'm always cold wherever we go I probably should take a down layer - my parka stuffs into a tiny sack so it won't take up much room and it sounds like I might be glad to have it. Or I have a down vest that might be easier to use as it could fit under the Hurtigruten jacket more easily I guess.

 

I wouldn't have thought to bring a bathing suit - not sure I'll be bold enough to do the polar plunge but it's good to have the option - thanks for the reminder!

 

Did you have much free time in Ush. before boarding the ship? Do I need to be researching & making plans for several hours or when you arrive there does the group more or less stay together until boarding the Fram?

 

Also, we'll have only one extra day at the start of the trip in BA. I'm thinking of making arrangements with a guide for that day just to maximize our limited time. Did you by chance do that or spend time independently in BA - maybe a guide is not necessary?

 

Thanks again,

Leslie

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The boots & jacket they provide are fine. We hate packing around big suitcases and managed to do this trip with just a carry on suitcase & small backpack each so no checked luggage for the international flight although we did check the carry-on for the South American flights we had. Besides Antarctica we also spent 10 days in the summer heat of Rio & Iguassu falls.

 

We do have some mountaineering type technical gear that is very light & packs very small. Instead of a fleece (which is bulky) we took synthetic "puff" jackets which stuff very small (technical down sweater would also work perfectly). Also took a light fleece vest which was nice to have but overkill. The parka they provide is quite windproof and will hold in warmth. Our temps were usually in the low 40's, but it was the wind that determined how cold you were not the temps. Toque (Canadian for ski hat), gloves, two pairs warm ski-type socks (in case on two-landing days one gets wet), wind/rain pants, winter running tights or long johns (I like the tights as I could also wander around the ship in them), trail running shoes (used for hikes in South Georgia & Falklands), teva sandals, polypro top.

 

We did a couple of excursions in the Falklands as well as the hike on South Georgia where I wore the trail runners. Whether you need the hiking boots will depend on your own comfort level in trail runners vs. hiking boots and which activities you will partake in. For me, trail runners were fine and boots would have been overkill.

 

No chemical warmers but...I wear orthotics and took them out of my shoes and put them in my rubber boots on all the landings. They added a layer of stability and warmth to the boot. Even if you don't wear orthotics, I would recommend just using your running shoe insole to line the boot on your landings, just remember to remove it from the boot when you get back to the ship!!

 

One other item I was very happy to have was a "buff". It's a lightweight neck tubey thing that can take on all kinds of permutations, nice to cover the face on the polar cirkle boat rides to the landing sights, just enough warmth on the face and keeps some of the spray off as well as being wind protection. You can check out my husband's photos on www dot gtbow dot smugmug dot com and get a better idea of what I'm talking about!

 

I roasted inside the ship, especially at the lectures. I usually just ended up in shorts, t-shirt & tevas while inside but I do run hotter than most. My husband, who runs colder than most, never needed a layer while inside.

 

Besides sunscreen, you may go through much more moisturizing lotion than you ever have before; it is an incredibly dry place. We purchased some in Ushuaia so didn't pack it over from the US.

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[

Did you have much free time in Ush. before boarding the ship? Do I need to be researching & making plans for several hours or when you arrive there does the group more or less stay together until boarding the Fram?

 

Also, we'll have only one extra day at the start of the trip in BA. I'm thinking of making arrangements with a guide for that day just to maximize our limited time. Did you by chance do that or spend time independently in BA - maybe a guide is not necessary?

 

Thanks again,

Leslie

 

How much time you have in Ushuaia will depend on what time your flight is and whether it actually departs when it is supposed to!! We were scheduled to leave BA at 5:45am and didn't leave until closer to noon. You have options of Ushuaia tours, we had signed up for one but cancelled it due to the delay in the flight. We have a couple of hours in town to pick up a few things, wine, snacks (not necessary), lotion etc and have a good cup of coffee. Speaking of coffee, we did bring some Starbucks instant on board as the ships coffee was not great as you've probably read in other threads!

 

For BA, I highly recommend www dot bafreetour dot com . You tip what you feel the tour was worth and it is a good couple of hours getting to know the city. If you are staying at the Emperador, you can walk to Recoletta cemetery from there later in the day. BA is a fabulous walking city and also has a good subway system.

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Excellent advice - thanks!

I have a neck gaiter packed away somewhere from back when I used to ski - I'll make sure to find it or get another one. Did you also use a scarf or did that really take the place of a scarf?

 

We won't be doing any Falklands or S. Georgia stops so I think I won't need any other shoes for landings other than the boots they supply. I won't bother with hiking boots. I will keep in mind the inserts for boots - I have some smartfeet ones i can pack.

 

I can't believe you were that warm on the ship! Too funny to be wearing shorts and sandals in Antarctica.

 

Coffee, lots of sunscreen - will make sure to take - they are high priority items for sure.

 

I can't believe you were able to use just carry-on sized bags. Especially dealing with temps at both extremes. Bravo! That's my goal on every trip I take but I've yet to accomplish it.

 

I've taken notes from your packing tips and also the walking tour site & will check out your photos. Thank you so much for your advice :)

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Carmelita - your pictures were wonderful - thanks for sharing them.

 

I was wondering if you had rough seas coming across Drake Passage - that last picture looked rough! I usually take Bonine even on calm Carib. or Med. cruises - I hope it's up to the task of getting me through DP.

 

Also, did you take bathing suits and do the polar bear plunge? I would be tempted by the once-in-a-lifetime nature of it but it sounds like pure torture.

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Did you have much free time in Ush. before boarding the ship? Do I need to be researching & making plans for several hours or when you arrive there does the group more or less stay together until boarding the Fram?

 

Also, we'll have only one extra day at the start of the trip in BA. I'm thinking of making arrangements with a guide for that day just to maximize our limited time. Did you by chance do that or spend time independently in BA - maybe a guide is not necessary?

We had a few hours in Ushuaia, and there are some Hurtigruten excursions available, and the people who don't go on excursion are free to walk around on their own, which is what we have done. We explored the town a little bit on foot (it is not a big city) and we also visited the Maritime Museum located in the old Military Prison (interesting if you are into Maritime History). If you go to the Tourist Information Center, they have good maps of the city. They can also stamp your passport, which make a nice souvenir.

 

In BA we had only one afternoon and one evening, and we decided not to take a guide and just walk around for a few hours from the hotel. We probably missed most of what BA had to offer (we still saw Plaza Cinqo de Mayo, had a beer outside watching tango dancers and enjoyed a fabulous steak dinner!). It actually was a bit strange to be in BA for such a short time before the trip. Coming from a cold European winter, being thrown in a 30°C atmosphere for only a few hours after a long plane trip was disconcerting (and tiring), and we were so impatient to get on the ship. It was even worse coming back after the trip in Antarctica. We didn't want the trip to end, we had so many incredible pictures of Antarctica in our heart and in our head, coming back to BA was a bit brutal. For us, BA was not the purpose of the trip and if we wanted to really enjoy that side of Argentina, we should either stay longer, or come back later. If you want to see BA (which seems actually a very vibrant and rich city) in such a short time, a guide could be a good idea.

 

We had the "Drake Lake" on the way to Antarctica, and a bit of the Drake Shake coming back, but nothing awful.

You can see my pictures on my blog (in my signature, text is in French only but there is little text and mostly pictures, and you can translate using Google if necessary).

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SarniaLo: Yes, what you say about the time in BA is how I'm feeling. I think since we don't have enough time off from work to do it "right" I'd almost rather not try to do it at all in one day. It will just be such a little blip in the middle of traveling a (fairly) long way and then moving on towards Antarctica. But since we will have one full day I think we can make the most of it with a guide rather than trying to go around by ourselves. It does seem it deserves so much more time and hopefully we'll be back some day for a longer proper visit.

 

Ushaia -- We will just walk around there and possibly visit the museum.

 

Thanks again for the info and I did check out your beautiful pictures & blog. Incroyable! :) Makes me want to go to Norway, too, soon!

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