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Just Back from Buenos Aires - Any Questions?


ReadyToFloat

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Wow - I'm really getting the itch to head back to Buenos Aires.

 

Can I live vicariously through anyone?

 

--Anyone headed there soon who will talk about their plans?

 

--Anyone just back that will talk about their experience?

 

 

Hi ,

I will be in BA Jan 19- Jan 22.

I have reservations for dinner and show at Rojo Tango on Jan 20.

How is the food at this venue?

How is the show?

Should I try to just see the show and dine elsewhere?

Any suggestions?

Thanks.

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Hi ,

I will be in BA Jan 19- Jan 22.

I have reservations for dinner and show at Rojo Tango on Jan 20.

How is the food at this venue?

How is the show?

Should I try to just see the show and dine elsewhere?

Any suggestions?

Thanks.

 

 

I've heard good things about Rojo, though I've not seen it. Members of my group went to the Almacen Show, and they loved it.

 

I've heard the food at these places is so-so. If you have an option to just watch the show, you might head out to a nice restaurant first, then hop on over to watch the show. If it were me, that's what I'd be doing.

 

I've posted it before, though my favorite meal was at La Cabrera in the Palermo area. Wow. I still have dreams about that meal it was so good.

 

Palermo might be a little far, though there are lots of good options throughout BsAs.

 

Let us all know your thoughts on the show upon your return!

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I unfortunately wasn't there for a cruise, but just spent over two weeks in Buenos Aires. It is a fabulous city - rich in history, culture and architecture. There is a lot to do and to see.

 

If you have any questions about the area, I'll be happy to try and help.

 

 

In advance, if I were there for a day, I would:

-Take a guided walking tour (~2.5 hours)

-Visit Cafe Tortoni (a 150 year old cafe) for a cup of slow coffee

-Visit a Parrilla for some of the best beef in the world (Bife de Chorizo, Lomo, and Oho were my favorite cuts)

-Visit Florida Street for a pedestrian shopping experience, starting at Avenida de Mayo and ending at Plaza San Martin for a rest and photos

-Find Dulce de Leche with chocolate at a shop and taste a great treat

-Consider a Tango Show (free on Sundays on the streets of San Telmo, least expensive at Cafe Tortoni, or one of the more tourist productions - depending on your style)

-Consider a visit to Recoleta (amazing cemetary) or La Boca (brightly colored homes/streets)

 

 

I wouldn't worry too much about transportation - taxis are everywhere, and our fares ranged from $6-30 pesos ($1USD = ~$3 pesos), so you can essentially divide everything by 3 for the conversion to USD. So, our most expensive taxi was $10. Get ready for a Formula 1 taxi/race car experience, and when your driver weaves in and out of the lanes, realize the stripes on the roadway are mostly viewed as 'suggestions.' Your heart might skip a few beats, though drivers have a sixth sense to avoid collisions.

 

Subway was good - just 1 peso, though it can get crowded and quite warm. I was on the subway dozens of times and never had a challenge.

 

Airport was quick and efficient - customs experience was good, though note that on the way out you'll most likely have to pay an airport tax ($18USD/54pesos) that isn't included in tickets (apparently it's a private airport and that affects prepayment in airline tickets). So, after check in you'll be directed to an area to pay the tax (many credit cards accepted), which is quick and efficient. If you arrive early at the gate, many flights to the US have a secondary security checkpoint at the gate (a few questions, carry-on bag checks, and metal wand checks) prior to boarding. NOTE: not many choices for food in the BsAs airport, so I'd suggest eating prior to the airport and just get a snack there if you are hungry.

 

 

Any questions, let me know!

We are flying from Miami directly to B.A. on 12-7-08 on LAN Airlines. I noticed on their website that the carry on baggage is 17 lbs. max, and one carryon and 1 personal item. That is fine but do they actually weigh your carryon luggage or measure it. Now strict are they. I like to be prepared if they lose our luggage so like to pack a couple of days of clothes just in case. We are cruising the same day as arrival. How strict are they?

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Can you tell me if your are allowed to use video cameras in the different Tango shows which you all have mentioned or have seen?.... I only want to go to a show where can use the video camera.

 

Any suggestions also for any type of typical horse shows.....gaucho style in Buenos Aires?

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  • 2 weeks later...

I've seen lots of video of Tango shows on the internet, and many in our group were able to use the video on their regular cameras, so I anticipate it's still permitted. I doubt very few people would see the show on the web and feel like they've 'been there,' as it is a unique experience.

 

As for horse shows... sorry, don't know of any.

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We are visiting Buenos Aires for two days next Jan.'09 while on the Mariner of the Seas - can anyone recommend some good, reputable stores

for leather goods - we would like to get some jackets for our sons. Thanks. :)

 

A local who maintains a site is Alan Patrick at www.buenostours.com. He has some good info on the area, a self walking tour, and he also does tours as well. Check out his site, and if there's not the shopping infor you are looking for, consider emailing him.

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One thing I haven't seen mentioned but saw on the Travel Channel as a great thing to do when visiting B.A. is visiting an estancia. I could swear they spoke of some where you can spend the night. Kind of a ranch-like pousada, where you can see real caballeros in action and where they put on kind of a show. A few mos. ago through tripadvisor I saw mention of one where you visited for the day, meat was grilled on a huge barbecue style grill and options were to swim, laze around for the day, or ride horses. This was only a day trip, however - not an overnt. stay. Do any of you have any information on that type of an experience? We will probably be staying 3 or days in B.A. prior to embarkation and doing something like this sounds great!

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One thing I haven't seen mentioned but saw on the Travel Channel as a great thing to do when visiting B.A. is visiting an estancia. I could swear they spoke of some where you can spend the night. Kind of a ranch-like pousada, where you can see real caballeros in action and where they put on kind of a show. A few mos. ago through tripadvisor I saw mention of one where you visited for the day, meat was grilled on a huge barbecue style grill and options were to swim, laze around for the day, or ride horses. This was only a day trip, however - not an overnt. stay. Do any of you have any information on that type of an experience? We will probably be staying 3 or days in B.A. prior to embarkation and doing something like this sounds great!

 

Two resources:

http://www.welcomeargentina.com/estancias/buenosaires_i.html

http://www.tripadvisor.com/Attraction_Review-g312741-d600897-Reviews-Estancia_Los_Dos_Hermanos-Buenos_Aires_Capital_Federal_District.html

 

I didn't visit an Estancia, though I would LOVE to next time I'm there. Some friends did visit an Estancia in another part of Argentina, and felt it was fantastic - and while it wasn't cheap (though they are!), they said it was worth EVERY penny.

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Last night I saw some link early in the first few pages of a Fodors book on Argentina. Just haven't had time to check them out. Thanks for the links and when I have more time I will check them out. Even if we have to just go to one outside of B.A. for the day, at least it'll be something different! Thanks for replying.

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Last night I saw some link early in the first few pages of a Fodors book on Argentina. Just haven't had time to check them out. Thanks for the links and when I have more time I will check them out. Even if we have to just go to one outside of B.A. for the day, at least it'll be something different! Thanks for replying.

 

 

If you find some good resources, please post. Thanks!

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I didn't see any options once we got on the island for alternative tours... they may be there, but I didn't see any and wasn't necessarily looking.

As for transportation on the island, the old town and preserved site is around 10-15 blocks...

 

I second the recommendation to visit Colonia. However, FYI, neither Colonia nor Uruguay is on an island. The ferry from B.A. crosses the Rio Plata.

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I second the recommendation to visit Colonia. However, FYI, neither Colonia nor Uruguay is on an island. The ferry from B.A. crosses the Rio Plata.

 

Point taken. Guess you need to be surrounded by water to be an island, eh? :) Even if it's a river, 3 sides is close, though not quite 4.

 

I guess we can reference the tourist area as a peninsula.

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Can we use US Dollars in Buenos Aires and other places in Argentina or do we have to use pesos?

 

We converted to pesos. Very few places accepted dollars. Often, the corner markets will also convert for you if you ask... we used the little family owned market next to our hotel as our ATM most of the time. We knew the exchange rate, though people always offered a fair exchange at these places. Just make sure to ask if they'll do that, and be careful (as anywhere) about exchanging large bills at the same place if you are in public.

 

That said, after over two weeks in BsAs, we never had a safety issue.

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Saw something re: Visas for Brazil for people JUST going to Iguazu Falls. According to Fodor's Argentina '08, IF you get certain taxi drivers on the Argentine side that have a "deal" worked out w/the border people in Brazil, they will let you in WITHOUT a visa! (Watch them see this on here and stop it! But no doubt they already know Fodor's printed it - w/a warning that it might not always work out.) Also, certain travel agencies on the Argentine side have this already worked out and know how to get you through. Otherwise, if you show up at the border w/out a visa, it takes only 3 hrs. to get a visa, instead of the usual length of time it does in the states. Same cost, however. Or if you apply ahead of time once out of the U.S. (before you get ready to cross over, say if you are in Buenos Aires, for instance???), it says the Brazilian officials often want to see a ticket back OUT of Brazil, though, or they won't approve the visa on the spot. Apparently at times they crack down. But sometimes just wave cab drivers on through. This is interesting. I guess a lot of people show up thinking they will only see the Argentinian side, but then want to go over to the Brazilian side (very beautiful!). The Fodor's book makes the Brazilian side sound dangerous at night. I don't know about their summer mos. (like Jan. and Feb.), but we were there walking ALL over the place at night in early Nov. last yr. and felt very, very safe. No one bothered us at all! I even walked over to this one shopping st. by myself in the early part of the darkness (later joined by my husband), and around these vendor stalls set up behind it. No problems. Everyone was very,very nice and no one tried to cheat us or bother us. Quite the opposite!

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Saw something re: Visas for Brazil for people JUST going to Iguazu Falls. According to Fodor's Argentina '08, IF you get certain taxi drivers on the Argentine side that have a "deal" worked out w/the border people in Brazil, they will let you in WITHOUT a visa! (Watch them see this on here and stop it! But no doubt they already know Fodor's printed it - w/a warning that it might not always work out.) Also, certain travel agencies on the Argentine side have this already worked out and know how to get you through. Otherwise, if you show up at the border w/out a visa, it takes only 3 hrs. to get a visa, instead of the usual length of time it does in the states. Same cost, however. Or if you apply ahead of time once out of the U.S. (before you get ready to cross over, say if you are in Buenos Aires, for instance???), it says the Brazilian officials often want to see a ticket back OUT of Brazil, though, or they won't approve the visa on the spot. Apparently at times they crack down. But sometimes just wave cab drivers on through. This is interesting. I guess a lot of people show up thinking they will only see the Argentinian side, but then want to go over to the Brazilian side (very beautiful!). The Fodor's book makes the Brazilian side sound dangerous at night. I don't know about their summer mos. (like Jan. and Feb.), but we were there walking ALL over the place at night in early Nov. last yr. and felt very, very safe. No one bothered us at all! I even walked over to this one shopping st. by myself in the early part of the darkness (later joined by my husband), and around these vendor stalls set up behind it. No problems. Everyone was very,very nice and no one tried to cheat us or bother us. Quite the opposite!

 

Yea, but they probably want the same amount you would have had to pay for the visa, and then may want even more to let you out. Why chance it unless just a last minute attempt.

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  • 3 weeks later...
Saw something re: Visas for Brazil for people JUST going to Iguazu Falls. According to Fodor's Argentina '08, IF you get certain taxi drivers on the Argentine side that have a "deal" worked out w/the border people in Brazil, they will let you in WITHOUT a visa!

 

As of last week, during our visit to Iguazu AR, we were told that the visas are now required and that you must present yourself in the morning at the Brazilian consulate in Iguazu city and return in the afternoon to pick them up. The taxi drivers are displeased because this procedure has eliminated the spur-of-the-moment trips.

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I was there last Nov. and the visa were required then. So this is not something new. The article I saw was suggesting that sometimes the taxi drivers/travel agents were able to get clients over to Brazil for Iguazu Falls w/out one. However, I would not be surprised if the authorities saw the same thing I did (forgot if it was online or in a travel mag???) and have put the squeaks on that practice.

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