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Foods you would never eat


lenquixote66
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1 hour ago, lenquixote66 said:

Asparagus

 

Caviar

 

Spam 

I'm curious. Why would you NOT eat these? Also, how were these served to you the first time you had them?I wonder if they were served differently if your palate might expand to include them... 

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1 hour ago, Dreamer68 said:

I'm curious. Why would you NOT eat these? Also, how were these served to you the first time you had them?I wonder if they were served differently if your palate might expand to include them... 

I never ate any of them .The odors deter me.

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1 hour ago, lenquixote66 said:

I never ate any of them .The odors deter me.

That's unfortunate that you've never eaten these. I understand how odors can deter anyone from trying something new. I am fortunate to have tasted wonderful dishes which included each of these... I have to thank my late dad for all the opportunities he offered his kids to taste as much of the world as possible. 😍

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There is almost nothing I won't eat if it is put in front of me. There is an exception.

 

Some years back, we were in northern France, near the town of Cambrai. The surrounding area saw a major battle in 1917 and I'd gone to photograph the graves of some men who had been killed fighting with our local battalion . In due course, we decided to drive into town in search of food and, more importantly, a toilet. We found both at a supermarket on the outskirts. Then we had a look round the supermarket and found a "local products" section. One such was a salami looking  sausage called Andouilette de Cambrai. That had to be worth a try - a product local to Cambrai, bought in Cambrai. We didnt open it until we got home. It is the most awful thing - it smells like crap and it tastes what I imagine crap tastes like. One bite was enough. Never again. 

 

As for Len's asparagus, I just love it. But I'll only buy it during the six or so weeks the local crop is in season. Then, we'll have it several times a week. I've had caviar a couple of times and find it OK but not something I'd seek out. Don't think I've ever tasted Spam - although that may change soon. I'm trying to get to know Korean food and have seen that it's often an ingredient in kimchi fried rice (which I like). Apparently introduced to the local population by American troops.  

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15 hours ago, Dreamer68 said:

That's unfortunate that you've never eaten these. I understand how odors can deter anyone from trying something new. I am fortunate to have tasted wonderful dishes which included each of these... I have to thank my late dad for all the opportunities he offered his kids to taste as much of the world as possible. 😍

Montreal is my favorite city on the planet.Perhaps if I had grown up there I would have eaten other foods.

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2 hours ago, Harters said:

There is almost nothing I won't eat if it is put in front of me. There is an exception.

 

Some years back, we were in northern France, near the town of Cambrai. The surrounding area saw a major battle in 1917 and I'd gone to photograph the graves of some men who had been killed fighting with our local battalion . In due course, we decided to drive into town in search of food and, more importantly, a toilet. We found both at a supermarket on the outskirts. Then we had a look round the supermarket and found a "local products" section. One such was a salami looking  sausage called Andouilette de Cambrai. That had to be worth a try - a product local to Cambrai, bought in Cambrai. We didnt open it until we got home. It is the most awful thing - it smells like crap and it tastes what I imagine crap tastes like. One bite was enough. Never again. 

 

As for Len's asparagus, I just love it. But I'll only buy it during the six or so weeks the local crop is in season. Then, we'll have it several times a week. I've had caviar a couple of times and find it OK but not something I'd seek out. Don't think I've ever tasted Spam - although that may change soon. I'm trying to get to know Korean food and have seen that it's often an ingredient in kimchi fried rice (which I like). Apparently introduced to the local population by American troops.  

The only food I ever ate that had a horrible odor was pickled pigs feet.The grandmother of a childhood friend was visiting from Jamaica,BWI and I did not wish to offend her by not trying a food that she prepared.It tasted awful to me.

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On 3/18/2024 at 1:24 PM, CHPURSER said:

“If you reject the food, ignore the customs, fear the religion, and avoid the people, you’d be better staying at home.” – James Michener

I am currently home bound and do not foresee a change in this lifetime.

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On 3/18/2024 at 1:24 PM, CHPURSER said:

“If you reject the food, ignore the customs, fear the religion, and avoid the people, you’d be better staying at home.” – James Michener

LOVE this quote @CHPURSER! I'm an educator in a school where at any given time, there are at least 25 cultural groups represented. One of the best books I read my students taught them not to yuck someone else's yum. It was great hearing the kids say this quote throughout the rest of their school years whenever recess rolled around and interesting things came out of people's lunch bags. 😍 I've shared the quote with our church's mission teams before their travels abroad and I've been blessed with intriguing culinary adventures they dared to take overseas, especially when they were invited to humble meals of thanks from the recipients of the help the teams were bringing. 😍

 

PS - I think the quote is a general one about opening one's eyes to the amazing diversity of our world, about developing an open mindset in general. I'm thankful for my dad who traveled quite a bit for his work and therefore encouraged his kids to be readers and travelers. There are always individual circumstances that do not fit the general mold. I am sorry to hear you are homebound for the foreseeable future @lenquixote66. I hope you have amazing memories of your years of travel to keep you smiling and to keep sharing. It's been wonderful to read people's experiences here.

 

Edited by Dreamer68
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On 3/17/2024 at 9:02 AM, Harters said:

As for Len's asparagus, I just love it. But I'll only buy it during the six or so weeks the local crop is in season. Then, we'll have it several times a week. I've had caviar a couple of times and find it OK but not something I'd seek out. Don't think I've ever tasted Spam - although that may change soon. I'm trying to get to know Korean food and have seen that it's often an ingredient in kimchi fried rice (which I like). Apparently introduced to the local population by American troops.  

In my suburb in Montreal, they plant select vegetables in some of our parks scattered all over their territory. One year, walking my dog, we found...yes... asparagus next to chives at the park closest to our home.  Very cool! Someone else had appreciated the asparagus and had cut a few stalks Hahaha! Then, at the public library in the big concrete flower pots, there were tomato plants growing and nasturtiums (I plant nasturtiums at home to use their flowers to perk up my salads)... so awesome to see these edible designs and intentions. I wonder what they will plant this spring and summer. I'll share some photos if there's anything interesting. 

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4 hours ago, Dreamer68 said:

LOVE this quote @CHPURSER! I'm an educator in a school where at any given time, there are at least 25 cultural groups represented. One of the best books I read my students taught them not to yuck someone else's yum. It was great hearing the kids say this quote throughout the rest of their school years whenever recess rolled around and interesting things came out of people's lunch bags. 😍 I've shared the quote with our church's mission teams before their travels abroad and I've been blessed with intriguing culinary adventures they dared to take overseas, especially when they were invited to humble meals of thanks from the recipients of the help the teams were bringing. 😍

 

PS - I think the quote is a general one about opening one's eyes to the amazing diversity of our world, about developing an open mindset in general. I'm thankful for my dad who traveled quite a bit for his work and therefore encouraged his kids to be readers and travelers. There are always individual circumstances that do not fit the general mold. I am sorry to hear you are homebound for the foreseeable future @lenquixote66. I hope you have amazing memories of your years of travel to keep you smiling and to keep sharing. It's been wonderful to read people's experiences here.

 

Yes,it is wonderful.Thank you.

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I would not eat the following:

 

1) liver (see liver and onions) I have tried it, the texture and flavour turn my stomach. Pate is a different story.

 

2) silkworms. I lived in China for a year, I dined at several restaurants that served them, unfortunately the odour and appearance deterred me every time I tried to muster the courage to try them. 
 

3) shark. Mostly ethical reasons, also they are my favourite animal. I stopped going to my one time favourite Japanese restaurant when I found out they served shark fin soup. 

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15 hours ago, CHPURSER said:

Like you , I lived in China - but for 10 years.

So you must already know that the Japanese do not generally eat Shark Fin Soup.

That is very Chinese.

Your favorite Japanese Restaurant was probably Chinese-owned.

I never asked who owned it, and it closed a few years later when I was living in Egypt. I had actually never seen the dish on any menu anywhere during my travels around Asia, but only in this one restaurant in Canada and it did not always have it (like I never saw it the first couple of years I would go there) You may be right though, I also wasn’t meaning to sound insensitive towards anyone, I only mentioned it was a Japanese restaurant because it was marketed and presented as one. (Like literally part of the name). 

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  • 4 weeks later...
15 hours ago, Donald said:

I would never again eat American Fast (Junk) Food.

Tried it a few times and got sick every time.

It is just plain unhealthy.

What is the difference between American Fast Food and that of other countries .?

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14 hours ago, lenquixote66 said:

What is the difference between American Fast Food and that of other countries .?

In  the UK, almost all "fast food" outlets would be American in origin or based on original American companies. It's a description that you really only here mentioned in connection with the likes of American burger chains. 

 

Even though our own fish & chips shops are selling fast food, they aren't usually described as "fast food". 

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