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bEwAbG

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About bEwAbG

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  1. I did Glacier Bay in mid May two years ago. I agree it is more likely a scheduling issue.
  2. I was watching some interview on Amanpour on PBS last night and a doctor said that in many cases, it appears that the body's response to the virus kicks into overdrive and causes complications very rapidly. She has seen people go from looking and acting ok to being on a ventilator within a few hours. Not a situation you would want to be in at sea.
  3. The policy only exists because of COVID-19. The question will really be whether or not there is a period of time in which cruise ships begin sailing before it is manageable via vaccine or treatment or it recedes altogether. As long as there are enough cases to have to worry about an outbreak at sea, I don't think they'll be allowed to sail anywhere, with or without this policy in place.
  4. I would probably wait a week or two before telling them. It's very possible that they'll realize the error and correct it on their own. If not, then definitely let them know.
  5. And run! I don't know if Celebrity will make it or not. If they go bankrupt, any company that emerges wouldn't have to honor the FCC. I'd take the cash if it was an option. I wonder if their "cruise protection" products would still pay out or if those would also be worth nothing. I guess it depends on how those instruments are structured but I always assumed it was some sort of self-insurance backed by the company only instead of actual insurance. There is a long story in today's Washington Post about how the cruise line handled the crisis. The few hundred comments after the story accurately reflect the overwhelming sentiment that no U.S. taxpayer money should go to bail out these foreign-owned companies. I think the only one who has lined up behind that idea is Trump, mainly because of his friendship with several of the major players.
  6. Realistically, they're talking about end of April for this to peak in North America, but that doesn't mean the restrictions will be over. Recommendation currently is no gatherings over 50 people for 8 weeks, which is the second week of May. I'm guessing it's going to be a very slow crawl back to "normal" unless the virus peters out sooner than expected. Even then, there will not be vaccines for it until next year, so the fear all summer will be what happens in the fall & beyond. The Spanish Flu in 1918 came roaring back at the end of August with its highest death toll in October - November timeframe. Authorities are going to do everything in their power to keep that from happening. The cruise lines are going to have to prove that it's not an issue on their ships before governments are going to allow them to sail with a broader audience. I can very easily see them keeping this restriction in place for a few months if not into next year.
  7. Yes, of course. I should have used "enacted" instead of "adopted." The point being that the Carnival companies had not yet announced they were enacting this whereas RCCL and NCL ones had. I think the 30 days was based on what was happening at the end of last week when most companies were shuttering stuff until the end of March or the first week of April. The CDC has now upped their number to 8 weeks. You'll start hearing about more and more businesses being closed until mid May. Announcements are already starting.
  8. You don't think it's important that people exposed to this virus should be told about that exposure?
  9. bEwAbG

    Stress

    All of these things are contracts. At the end of the day, the business is going to adhere to the terms you agreed to, especially in situations like this, where saving the business is more important to them in the short term. Never book nonrefundable anything unless you're ok with losing the cost altogether.
  10. This was a proposal by the cruise line's lobbying arm. RCCL brands adopted it. NCL adopted it. CCL brands had not yet said one way or the other when they announced a cessation of operations for 30 days. This was all very fast moving but it looks like the industry was willing to adopt this restriction industry-wide in order to keep ships sailing. Now that they have a little breathing room, you can bet it's still under discussion, especially if it's a requirement by the government to allow cruises to resume.
  11. That the executive suite at X is staying mum about known COVID-19 cases on their ships is particularly appalling. If they cannot be upfront about that, of all things, why would you ever trust them with anything?
  12. I would cancel anything and everything you can if it's without penalty. You have a few more weeks to see how things progress but I wouldn't leave it to the last minute. Best case would be that your cruise happens and you could rebook, probably for a lower cost. However, I seriously doubt that any trip before July is going to happen. Realistically, they're talking about end of April for this to peak in North America, but that doesn't mean the restrictions will be over. Recommendation currently is no gatherings over 50 people for 8 weeks, which is the second week of May. Will everything be up and running just 3 weeks later? I'm guessing it's going to be a very slow crawl back to "normal" unless the virus peters out sooner than expected. Even then, there will not be vaccines for it until next year, so the fear all summer will be what happens in the fall & beyond. The Spanish Flu in 1918 came roaring back at the end of August with its highest death toll in October - November timeframe.
  13. The cruise lines had all the info they needed to voluntarily make the call a week before they did. I agree it was irresponsible for them to send any more ships out, especially knowing what was about to happen with the shutdown.
  14. The uproar that would be caused by providing bailouts to foreign corporations would be immense, so I don't know why they would take this administration's word for it. More likely that they were told to do a voluntary action for a few weeks or face being shut out of the country altogether.
  15. Some of you need a reality check. Health authorities have wide latitude to work under expanded powers to curtail normal activity. The cruise industry was basically told "come up with some solutions to keep the government from having to shut you down" and this was their proposal. They will be the ones on the hook for future quarantines. The last thing they want is for people in the highest risk groups to end up there. It's not about if you'd be fine sailing on a ship but what has the potential to happen should the whole ship need to be quarantined. Knowing that those who fit a certain profile have the greatest risk of running into extreme trouble should they be exposed (this is based on current science), they're limiting the population of who is eligible to be on a cruise right now. You might have a case to argue for age discrimination if this was their permanent policy, though that of course would depend on the circumstances at hand, too. In the midst of a health crisis, all bets are off.
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