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chengkp75

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About chengkp75

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    Maine or at sea
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    Former cruise ship Chief Engineer

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  1. chengkp75

    Smoking is such a nuisance on cruise ships

    Again, while not promoting smoking, don't go there about safety. I know of no case where smoking on a ship's balcony ever caused a fire. And before you trot out the Star Princess, the investigation stated that the "likely" cause was a cigarette, "since no definitive cause could be found", and they could not replicate a cigarette igniting a Princess towel under controlled environment, despite their best efforts. Especially since the balconies have been fitted with either sprinklers or low combustible materials, the balconies are just as safe as any designated smoking area.
  2. chengkp75

    Smoking is such a nuisance on cruise ships

    Uh, you do realize that SouthWest is smoke free due to federal regulations? So, while Muse may have been ahead of time, there is a regulatory aspect to airlines and smoking that doesn't exist with cruise ships.
  3. chengkp75

    Tender Unloading Accident on Maasdam

    There would be less pitching motion, but there may well be more slamming noise and shuddering if speed is not matched to wave period, and there can be more "green water" and spray on the promenade deck. It looks to me like there are no forward facing balconies, so they may have anticipated more green water in that area.
  4. chengkp75

    Tender Unloading Accident on Maasdam

    The inverted bow is a way to increase the waterline length and hence the best hull speed of the ship (and further a reduction in fuel consumption), but it does reduce the reserve buoyancy of the bow, so that the ship will slice into seas more than a conventional bow would rise up a wave.
  5. chengkp75

    Tender Unloading Accident on Maasdam

    No, the sheep carriers are even uglier. I think the top heavy look is due to the perspective of the photo, I don't think it is in any way more radical in design (height for length or beam) than any other newer ship. I would love to see their engineering plant layout that has to compensate for that 90 ton monstrosity hanging off one side. Hope they've studied wind heel scenarios with that for sufficient ballast/fuel/potable water movement to counteract the moment arm of that thing.
  6. chengkp75

    Smoking is such a nuisance on cruise ships

    Actually, in addition to private residences, and private autos, the act allows smoking in hotel rooms and 25% of outdoor seating areas of restaurants and bars. For those who think that the economic model that caused the Carnival non-smoking ship to fail (and one of the reasons was their inability to get crew to sail the ship), just remember that 37+ million Americans, better than 1 in 10 still smokes. I am not advocating smoking, I don't care about it, but I also don't see where there is any incentive for a non-US flag ship to comply with US laws or US mores about smoking, considering that 20%, or twice the US numbers, of the world population smoke (over 1 billion people), and countries where crew are from are some of the highest percentage of smokers in the world: Indonesia at 40%, Philippines at 43%, Pakistan at 41%, Romania at 37%. Nearly all of Southeast Asia and Eastern Europe are at the 40% range.
  7. Once again, Walker doesn't add facts that interfere with his agenda. He fails to mention that the MCL 2006 (Maritime Labor Convention), which has been in force since 2013, guarantees a minimum wage for all seafarers. Also, that article only references Carnival as having a published list of gratuity status. In my time at NCL, there was no such list, but just the contrary, where if a person had removed or reduced the DSC, then the steward and/or wait staff were questioned about their level of service.
  8. chengkp75

    Tender Unloading Accident on Maasdam

    It is, to my understanding, static when it reaches a level. I was going with your suggestion of "If it could move fast enough to stay level with a tender, it may be possible solution to safer tendering." But, that would add another whole level to the complexity of the device, and make it that much more prone to breakdown.
  9. chengkp75

    Tender Unloading Accident on Maasdam

    I've had my doubts about the platform on the Edge from day one. In order to move with a tender, it would have to float, and have about the same mass as the tender so that the response to waves would be identical to keep relative motion between the boat and platform at zero. Then, you would have to have all the people from or for the tender on the platform at one time, or you would have the same situation with relative motion between the platform and the ship. So, the platform would need to move with the boat to get everyone on/off the boat, then lock in place to get everyone from the platform to the ship. As for larger tender platforms, you must understand that the size of an opening in a ship's hull is limited by the watertight zones the ship is divided into (no opening can bridge more than one compartment), so this why tender platforms are the size they are. The tender platforms I've worked with all have handrails, either rigid or rope/chain, and the only open area is the space where you cross to the boat. The only way to prevent someone who falls while crossing from going overboard would be a ramp from the ship to the boat, and this would in some combination of boat to platform relative elevation cause the end of this ramp to be raised off the deck, again causing a hazard to mobility challenged (and even those not challenged). I suppose you could rig a net under the transfer point, much like ships do for their gangways, but this would have to be rigged and unrigged each time a boat reaches the tender platform, and would significantly slow down tendering, and present a risk to the crew rigging it. The most serious threat of someone while transiting to a tender is not falling in the water, it is being caught between the boat and the platform while they move relative to each other, and the danger of crushing injury. Tendering is an inherently risky operation, and I think the ships and crews do their best to mitigate the risk as best as possible.
  10. chengkp75

    Smoking is such a nuisance on cruise ships

    Of course there is a larger problem as you say. I've worked on offshore drilling vessels where gas detectors are integral to safety onboard. These required renewal constantly due to the corrosive nature of the maritime environment. If there were sufficiently robust smoke detectors for fire detection on outdoors ship's areas, SOLAS would have required them years ago.
  11. chengkp75

    Smoking is such a nuisance on cruise ships

    Has your empirical evidence been conducted on travel or tourist industry, and with a subject base that is not solely US? Are you saying that 93% of cruisers would approve of non-smoking, and thereby increase revenue? I don't think even 93% of the US is in favor of banning smoking, let alone an international clientele.
  12. chengkp75

    Smoking is such a nuisance on cruise ships

    So, still no sensor that operates in wind. Actually, I have googled cigarette smoke sensor. Humidity and temperature are basically irrelevant (though most of them do not recommend use in high humidity areas), but wind will move any smoke away from the sensors. Nearly every one recommends locations where drafts and winds do not move smoke away from the sensor. Also, to get a detection level to detect a single cigarette, you would likely get false alarms from the ship's exhaust.
  13. chengkp75

    Tender Unloading Accident on Maasdam

    So, in addition to taking up space in the hull for a dock area for amphibious vessels, you would add carrying amphibious tenders, since these would no longer be dual purposed as lifeboats. Or, if you look at LSD's (Dock Landing Ships) like the Anchorage class and earlier types that actually launched landing craft (small boats) rather than amphibious tractors, you would have the space for the hydraulics to open/close the stern door, and the ballast capability to sink the ship 6 feet or fill the dock space with water prior to opening the door. Given the very small amount of hull below the water above today's azipods, a well deck for small boats does not seem either economically or physically possible.
  14. chengkp75

    Smoking is such a nuisance on cruise ships

    And do these air pollution montors work while moving, and in high winds? Can they detect a single cigarette smoke in a windy condition? Most of these monitor particulate smoke, which would not normally be able to be collected from a detector on the overhead of a balcony. Please give an example of a sensor that would work in a ship's balcony environment that could detect a single cigarette, as I'm genuinely interested to see if the technology is present.
  15. chengkp75

    Smoking is such a nuisance on cruise ships

    Exactly how do you have a smoke detector for an outside space, especially one that is subject to possibly 20 knots of relative wind? Can you give an example of an outdoor smoke detector?
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