Jump to content

Recommended Posts

So what is up with Brazil? I recently booked an Amazon River cruise, but canceled when I discovered the draconian visa requirements placed upon US citizens to obtain a simple tourist visa. Sure, I was aware that they charge a fee that is directly in response to the fee the US charges to obtain a visa and was willing to pay it, but it goes further than that. They want letters of explanation why you want a visa to Brazil, passport photos, copies of drivers licenses, copies of "paid" airline or cruise tickets, and to top it off Chicago, Atlanta and Miami Consulates require financial bank records, one months for Chicago and Atlanta and three months for Miami. Then to top all this, Miami Consulate has added a more punitive requirement that beginning August 1, 2013, all applicants must appear in person. Exact quote from the Miami Consulate web site:

 

 

VISA APPLICATIONS BY MAIL OR THIRD PARTY ARE NO LONGER ACCEPTED

Beginning on August 1st 2013, based on the principle of reciprocity in diplomatic and consular relations, the Visa Department of the Consulate General of Brazil in Miami will no longer accept visa applications sent by mail or by a third party. All applicants must come to the Consulate to apply in person, with the only exception of minors, whose parents will be interviewed instead. All envelopes that arrive at the Consulate with the date of postage after July 31st will be returned.

The Consulate General of Brazil in Miami is located at 80 SW 8th Street 26th floor and office hours for visa applications are from Monday through Friday from 10am to 12pm.

 

Because obtaining a visa requires a minimum of two visits to the Consulate, one to apply and then another to retrieve your passport and visa (if approved) I find this most troubling. Maybe not much of a problem if you reside in Miami, but what if you live in Tallahaasee or worse, Puerto Rico (Which also falls under the Miami Consulates jurisdiction)?

 

The picture I get from this is that Brazil does not desire US tourists and have made it as difficult as possible for US citizens to obtain a visa. They don't have to knock me on the head with a hammer, I get it and will never, ever visit Brazil, neither now nor in the future.:mad:

Link to post
Share on other sites

The key phrase from the website is

Beginning on August 1st 2013, based on the principle of reciprocity in diplomatic and consular relations,

 

It sounds like Brazil instituted this because of the requirements for their citizens who want to get a visa to the US. Requirements for Brazilian citizens to get US Visa Note that Brazilian citizens are required to schedule 2 different interviews. The country of Brazil covers a larger area than the lower 48 and there are only 4 locations in Brazil where people can have the interviews.

 

If you are unhappy about it, you should contact your congressman/woman to get the requirements changed.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Poster Boulders is correct about the Draconian measures the US requires of Brazilians seeking a visa. Many must travel thousands of miles on an expensive overnight journey to reach a US Consulate and jump through hoops (paperwork-wise) held up by brusque-to-the-point-of-rude employee-representatives of the US government. (Been there-seen that. Embarassing at the very least to be a US citizen observer.)

Brazil would rather have these requirements made more reasonable for all (passport holders of both countries) than worry about a scant few tourist dollars.

Lots of places to visit in the world and no time for all, but not seeing the Amazon is your great loss. Perhaps when the US government changes its requirements, you can reschedule.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Did not realize this was a case of following suit with regard to US policy. Still, is this policy relegated just to Brazil or apply to other South American citizens as well? If not, then there still seems to me to be a problem with US-Brazil relations? I do know that from my research Brazil is the only country in South America with these requirements. IMHO, if this situation stands it will hurt the attendance at the Olympic games next year? Could be a major loss of revenue for them.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Did not realize this was a case of following suit with regard to US policy. Still, is this policy relegated just to Brazil or apply to other South American citizens as well? If not, then there still seems to me to be a problem with US-Brazil relations? I do know that from my research Brazil is the only country in South America with these requirements. IMHO, if this situation stands it will hurt the attendance at the Olympic games next year? Could be a major loss of revenue for them.

 

The policy applies to all countries in South America. Many South American countries now charge a reciprocity fee, charging citizens of the US the same amount for a tourist visa as citizens of their country are charged to visit our country.

 

You are right though, Brazil seems to be the only country in the region to take it a step further by requiring US citizens to pay the same fees and go through the same visa application process as Brazileros wishing to visit the USA. I imagine this is because Brazil's economy, by far the largest in South America and larger than France, Italy or Great Britain, means they are less dependent on tourist dollars from the US than other countries in the area.

Link to post
Share on other sites
The policy applies to all countries in South America. Many South American countries now charge a reciprocity fee, charging citizens of the US the same amount for a tourist visa as citizens of their country are charged to visit our country.

 

You are right though, Brazil seems to be the only country in the region to take it a step further by requiring US citizens to pay the same fees and go through the same visa application process as Brazileros wishing to visit the USA. I imagine this is because Brazil's economy, by far the largest in South America and larger than France, Italy or Great Britain, means they are less dependent on tourist dollars from the US than other countries in the area.

 

I don't know the requirements of other South American country's in detail, but Brazil appears to be the only one requiring US citizens to obtain an advance Visa. None of the other South American country's visited by cruise ships indicate a visa requirement in the cruise itineraries except ones that include Brazil. I don't know, perhaps the others make exceptions for cruise passengers? In addition, Brazil does not have to worry about terrorists trying to gain entry to their country as does the US, thus more likely the reason it is a little more difficult to enter the US?

 

You are also correct that Brazil has a fairly thriving economy that is not tourist based, so they probably could care less about US tourism. I also doubt that many Brazilians ever travel to the US as tourists and spend much money in the USA. Regardless, the appearance that US tourists are not desired in Brazil leaves me with the attitude that I will not spend any of my money there and does not change my position with regard to cruising there, sorry to say.

Link to post
Share on other sites

You are wrong. Here in Orlando the theme parks and shopping malls are teeming with well heeled Brasileiros spending money every winter. They definitely have a positive impact on our economy. I think their recent measures are a clever ploy to leverage a new, less cumbersome reciprocity agreement between the US and Brasil. They hope that North Americans will pressure their congressmen to finally rescind visa requirements to that both countries may freely travel. There have been talks for years about doing this, but lawmakers had little incentive until now. Brasil does have terrorist concerns, it is just not covered by US news agencies. Hopefully this requirement will end soon.

 

BTW I am traveling there in two weeks with my newly purchased visa. I can't wait! Oba Oba!!!

Link to post
Share on other sites
You are wrong. Here in Orlando the theme parks and shopping malls are teeming with well heeled Brasileiros spending money every winter. They definitely have a positive impact on our economy. I think their recent measures are a clever ploy to leverage a new, less cumbersome reciprocity agreement between the US and Brasil. They hope that North Americans will pressure their congressmen to finally rescind visa requirements to that both countries may freely travel. There have been talks for years about doing this, but lawmakers had little incentive until now. Brasil does have terrorist concerns, it is just not covered by US news agencies. Hopefully this requirement will end soon.

 

BTW I am traveling there in two weeks with my newly purchased visa. I can't wait! Oba Oba!!!

 

Well I hope you are right, I hope that whatever the diplomatic problems are they can get them worked out. Then maybe I will be able to take that Amazon cruise that I was looking forward to.

Link to post
Share on other sites

You can use a visa service to get the visa.

 

Brazil is spectacular.

 

We've visited Brazil several times and most recently on cruised the Amazon River earlier this year.

 

I would not let this change of policy stop me from going.

 

Keith

Link to post
Share on other sites
I don't know the requirements of other South American country's in detail, but Brazil appears to be the only one requiring US citizens to obtain an advance Visa. None of the other South American country's visited by cruise ships indicate a visa requirement in the cruise itineraries except ones that include Brazil. I don't know, perhaps the others make exceptions for cruise passengers? In addition, Brazil does not have to worry about terrorists trying to gain entry to their country as does the US, thus more likely the reason it is a little more difficult to enter the US?

 

You are also correct that Brazil has a fairly thriving economy that is not tourist based, so they probably could care less about US tourism. I also doubt that many Brazilians ever travel to the US as tourists and spend much money in the USA. Regardless, the appearance that US tourists are not desired in Brazil leaves me with the attitude that I will not spend any of my money there and does not change my position with regard to cruising there, sorry to say.

 

You are right that Brazil requires a Visa while other countries do not. Other countries do, however, charge an entry fee in the amount the US charges their citizens to visit our country. Same principle, just taken a step or two further by Brazil.

 

re: terrorism....Hezbollah has been active for years in the tri-border area of Brazil, Paraguay and Argentina. They carried out two bombings of Jewish sites in Buenos Aires in the early 90's and still operate training camps in the region.

Link to post
Share on other sites
....more likely the reason it is a little more difficult to enter the US?

 

The US is SO paranoid about Brazilians overstaying their visa once granted that it makes some Draconian decisions, which most US citizens remain unaware of. Perhaps if you had a better understanding of what happens to Brazilians, you would not frame the question in the manner in which you did.

 

For example, a Brazilian couple of my acquaintance, living in the US with legal permanent residence Green Card), have two adult children living in the US, and two in Brazil, one son in medical school, with a solid and comfortably lucrative career path in front of him in Brazil. (The father is now elderly and has had one open heart surgery and is in frail health.) The medical student was granted a tourist visa and visited his parents several times, returning on time to Brazil, just as required. When his visa expired and he applied for a new one, he was refused. He is no longer allowed to come to visit his parents, even in an emergency.

 

Let me ask this: How would you feel if this happened to you? Similar situations occur daily for Brazilians applying for visas to the U.S., perhaps simply to take the kids to Disney and spend money in the U.S.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I want to note that getting a Brazil Visa is so much better than just a couple of years ago.

 

Used to be that you had to obtain it no earlier than 90 days prior to entry otherwise it would expire and if you did it right it would last for five years. Now it is good for 10 years and you don't have that requirement to enter within 90 days. You can enter anytime during the validity of the visa.

 

Keith

Link to post
Share on other sites
The US is SO paranoid about Brazilians overstaying their visa once granted that it makes some Draconian decisions, which most US citizens remain unaware of. Perhaps if you had a better understanding of what happens to Brazilians, you would not frame the question in the manner in which you did.

 

 

 

Let me ask this: How would you feel if this happened to you? Similar situations occur daily for Brazilians applying for visas to the U.S., perhaps simply to take the kids to Disney and spend money in the U.S.

 

Meanwhile, Washington is debating the best way to allow 11 million folks who didn't bother to apply for a visa before coming to the US to stay on permanently. Go figure.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Meanwhile, Washington is debating the best way to allow 11 million folks who didn't bother to apply for a visa before coming to the US to stay on permanently. Go figure.

 

Well, as far as many Brazilians go, yes, they are here overstaying visas that were perhaps poor decisions to grant, on the part of those very same people who can be overly reactionary now in the other direction. Both types of decisions have often been badly thought-out to say the least, IMO. Supposedly they are trying to get to only 5% refusals in this manner (????????) which makes no sense to me.

 

But now that they (speaking about Brazilians, not any other countries' nationals) are established in the U.S., how would you propose to give them incentive to leave? Many who came because of the booming U.S. economy have already returned to Brazil because of the bad U.S. economy over the past few years, or because of homesickness, and in their place we have well-off Brazilian tourists on shopping sprees in Miami and tours of NYC. Many of the rest are employed (mostly self-employed, so no employing firm to penalize - and now paying taxes) and have established lives, property and U.S. citizen children (many of whom know only U.S. culture and the English language). Is it more fiscally responsible to find a way for them to stay legally and continue to contribute to the economy or spend billions on gestapo chasing families down to deport--and perhaps to raise "deportation orphans" who have rights as citizens? Should U.S. citizens use the model of WW2 Naz_i (not able/allowed to even write the word on this forum) "helpers" and turn in illegals? Finding some way for people to stay seems the only reasoned and reasonable course of action, IMHO.

Edited by VidaNaPraia
Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, to say the least I have definitely learned a bit about the workings of things between the US and Brazil from this forum. However, I still refuse to submit to what I consider to be unnecessary or punitive actions in order obtain the Visa, thus I stand on my convictions and will not waiver. Therefore Brazil will not be on my destination list until things change, if ever.

 

And, don't even get me started on the immigration thing..................:rolleyes:

Link to post
Share on other sites
Well, to say the least I have definitely learned a bit about the workings of things between the US and Brazil from this forum. However, I still refuse to submit to what I consider to be unnecessary or punitive actions in order obtain the Visa, thus I stand on my convictions and will not waiver. Therefore Brazil will not be on my destination list until things change, if ever.

 

And, don't even get me started on the immigration thing..................:rolleyes:

 

 

Well, glad you seem to have learned some things.

But clearly, "Do Unto Others..." does not appear to be one of them.

You will miss out on one of the most interesting and beautiful destinations in the world.

-----------

"The immigration thing" vis-a-vis Brazilians is a moral dillema that is pretty much as I stated: no effective way to keep folks from staying on permanently anyway, without turning ourselves into a Naz_i/Chinese/Stalinist type state with neighbors informing on one another and children being torn from their mothers' bosoms.

 

On that note, here's a little entertainment for you, maybe a little more to learn:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d9mbn3o1LZ0

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deportee_(Plane_Wreck_at_Los_Gatos))

 

Best wishes for a good vacation, wherever you end up. :-)

Edited by VidaNaPraia
Link to post
Share on other sites

I would not pass up my beloved Brasil for anything. It's worth the price to see minhas cariocas :) . I look forward to seeing old friends, and making new ones. In the future I hope to see the Amazon, Iguaçu falls, and the Nordeste. Rio first, then the rest of it.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Frankly, I was OK with going thru the process to obtain a Brazil Visa until I became aware of the more stringent requirements placed on the process by the Miami Consulate. I asked myself, why. Why has the Miami Consulate placed these additional burdens on us, like 3 months financial records, etc. when apparently none of the other consulates in the US are making this requirement. Then of course I discovered the "must appear in person" requirement, again (far as I have determined) once again only a requirement of the Miami office. That was when I began to reconsider my trip to Brazil because unfortunately I live within the Miami district.

 

As to Brazil parroting the requirements of the US and the US concern for Brazilians overstaying their visas in the US, this is probably a genuine problem. On the other hand, how many US tourists do you think overstay their Brazil visa? And more to the point, how many passengers on a Holland America Amazon Explorer cruise do you think jump ship in Brazil, I would venture to guess, zero?

Link to post
Share on other sites

We have learned over the years that the requirements vary by country but also based on events. Like us, they have their concerns and the rules are not just based on HAL passengers but for all people in a geography. You should be able to use a visa service. Save yourself the headache and do that.

 

Keith

Link to post
Share on other sites
... the more stringent requirements placed on the process by the Miami Consulate. I asked myself, why. Why has the Miami Consulate placed these additional burdens on us, like 3 months financial records, etc. when apparently none of the other consulates in the US are making this requirement.

Here's an anecdote for ya:

Ever go to a notary public in the U.S.? Pretty much the same process everywhere.

Go to a "cartorio", the equivalent in Brazil, and every one has slightly different requirements. And every employee may tell you a different story.

The cartorio is where you get married in Brazil. Imagine trying to get a straight answer about which documents they want (when all the ones from the U.S. for the U.S. partner have to be stamped as not-forgeries at the Brazilian Consulate in the U.S. and then translated in Brazil, so you have to be sure exactly what's needed or lose months in waiting time).

A frequent poster on one forum refers to it as Brazilian burro-cracy.

 

 

... I discovered the "must appear in person" requirement, again (far as I have determined) once again only a requirement of the Miami office.

Actually, I consider it sort of a priviledge to be allowed to go in person (and be able to ask whatever I need to and get any confusions that might have arisen out of the way face to face, in the Brazilian manner), instead of having to do the process by mail, but I do live quite near my Consulate with jurisdiction.

 

As to Brazil parroting the requirements of the US and the US concern for Brazilians overstaying their visas in the US, this is probably a genuine problem. On the other hand, how many US tourists do you think overstay their Brazil visa?

Enough so that I can quote you the exact fine (per day and maximum) for an overstay off the top of my head from the number of times someone has asked "What do I do now?" on the various Brazil travel forums. ;-) And also the amount of time you have to stay out of Brazil after overstaying your maximum prazo.

 

And more to the point, how many passengers on a Holland America Amazon Explorer cruise do you think jump ship in Brazil, I would venture to guess, zero?

But yes, most of them are younger people with more than 6 months of time free to stay in Brazil or involved with a Brazilian "significant other" and trying to figure out how to stay in Brazil with that partner.

Do realize, though, that the Consulate is not issuing Holland American visas, but simply visas for all Americans.

 

And again, do enjoy the vacation location you choose in the end.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I also doubt that many Brazilians ever travel to the US as tourists and spend much money in the USA.

 

Yes, they do and they shop. Miami and Orlando are popular destinations. A while ago, the Orlando Sentinel reported that Brazilians have asked to make getting a visa for the US less cumbersome.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Just received my Brazilian Visa.

The process was fairly easy.:D:D:D

Went on-line and filled out the application: https://scedv.serpro.gov.br/frscedv/index.jsp

After completing the application, I scheduled my appointment to drop off the appl and my passport. You need to print the completed one page form to attach your photo and signature. NOTE: The page containing this form would NOT open using Microsoft Windows Explorer. I downloaded Google Chrome and opened the page and printed the form with no problems.

You need to print/notate your application number. If going in person, I suggest printing your appointment time.

I was able to have my passport and visa returned by mail - United States Post Office Express Mail ONLY – No FedEX, UPS, etc. USPS only. You need to leave a self-addressed, pre-paid express mail envelope.

The $160 visa fee must also be paid by United States Post Office Money Order ONLY. I went to the post office and got the money order and a prepaid United States Post Office Express flat rate envelope. The PO accepted my debit card for payment.

You need a recent photo, I was able to get mine at Costco:

PHOTOGRAPH SPECIFICATIONS:

- The picture must be taken against an off-white plain background.

- The applicant’s face and shoulders must be centralized on the camera and he or she must be looking into the camera.

- No reflections, shadows or glares are accepted in the picture.

- The length from the bottom of chin to the top of the head must be between 31 and 36mm (millimeters) in height.

- The facial expression must be neutral.

- The eyes must be open and clearly visible.

- Glasses should not reflect any light. Neither sunglasses nor colorful frames are acceptable (no sunglasses or colored lens accepted).

- No head covering, excepting the ones used for religious reasons as long as they still enable the perfect visibility of the applicant’s face.

See this link for examples https://scedv.serpro.gov.br/frscedv/orientacoes/ICAO200811EN.pdf

My appointment was last Thursday, went to the consulate, dropped off the paper work, and received my passport and visa today – less than a week later.

For those Consulates that will accept the application by mail, the process is similar, you just have to pay an additional $20 fee (Which is well worth the convenience, and much less expensive than a trip to the City)

The requirement for a utility bill is simply to verify that you live in that Consulate’s jurisdiction.

The bank statement is to verify that you have sufficient funds to support yourself in the event you extend your stay.

Each Consulate may have slightly different requirements; just make sure that you carefully read the requirements for your jurisdiction

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • Forum Jump
    • Categories
      • Thank You for 25 Years - Click for Fun Stuff!
      • Forum Assistance
      • ANNOUNCEMENT: Crystal Cruises - New! Luxury Bahamas Escapes
      • ICYM Our Cruise Critic Live Special Event: Explore the Remote World with Hurtigruten!
      • New Cruisers
      • Cruise Lines “A – O”
      • Cruise Lines “P – Z”
      • River Cruising
      • ROLL CALLS
      • Digital Photography & Cruise Technology
      • Special Interest Cruising
      • Cruise Discussion Topics
      • UK Cruising
      • Australia & New Zealand Cruisers
      • Canadian Cruisers
      • North American Homeports
      • Ports of Call
      • Cruise Conversations
×
×
  • Create New...