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Walking to subway from Brooklyn cruise port


Itsnevertoolate
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I know, many will say I’m crazy, but I am traveling solo and trying to cut costs, so I am planning to travel to and from the Brooklyn cruise port by Subway via the Carroll St station.  I am an able bodied walker, and I’ll have just one rolling suitcase.  I’ve looked at the Google street level maps, and the walk to the port from Carroll St seems completely doable…except for actually entering the port. Where would (should) a pedestrian enter the port?  
I would love to hear from anyone who has actually made this trek on foot! 🙂

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3 hours ago, Itsnevertoolate said:

I know, many will say I’m crazy, but I am traveling solo and trying to cut costs, so I am planning to travel to and from the Brooklyn cruise port by Subway via the Carroll St station. 

The NYC ferry has a stop at the terminal with at most a 4 minute walk to the terminal.

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4 hours ago, meadowlander said:

The NYC ferry has a stop at the terminal with at most a 4 minute walk to the terminal.

Yes this is a good option. I found it wonderful to go buy boat to Wall Street and Brooklyn, made it a bit more special for us.
 

Do buy your tickets online because the lines for the ticket machines can be long. When we approached the ferry we saw a long line and were worried the Ferry would be full. I walked to the front to see what was going on. It took a long time to get a ticket from a machine for some people. As we had bought tickets through the NYC Ferry app we walked to the front and got in as one of the first leaving a lot of people on the quai behind( waiting for the next one)

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27 minutes ago, Itsnevertoolate said:

Thanks for the idea, but I am staying in Flushing, so the ferry is not a good option for me.  I'll be taking the subway from Flushing to Carroll St and walking from there to the port.

Getting from Flushing to lower Manhattan by subway to access the ferry is easier (close to a half hour shorter time)  than getting to Carroll Street - and it saves you the long walk in Brooklyn.

 

Edited by navybankerteacher
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3 hours ago, navybankerteacher said:

Getting from Flushing to lower Manhattan by subway to access the ferry is easier (close to a half hour shorter time)  than getting to Carroll Street - and it saves you the long walk in Brooklyn.

 

hmmm, that's a thought!  I will look at that.  Thanks!

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20 hours ago, Itsnevertoolate said:

I know, many will say I’m crazy, but I am traveling solo and trying to cut costs, so I am planning to travel to and from the Brooklyn cruise port by Subway via the Carroll St station. I am an able bodied walker, and I’ll have just one rolling suitcase. I’ve looked at the Google street level maps, and the walk to the port from Carroll St seems completely doable…except for actually entering the port. Where would (should) a pedestrian enter the port? I would love to hear from anyone who has actually made this trek on foot!

No, you're not crazy. If abled-bodied then there is no problem with your plan. I will note preliminarily that I reside in Flushing and have walked to the Brooklyn Cruise Port.

 

From Flushing you will want to travel on the no. 7 train to Court Square station. Use the escalator to descend from the elevated portion of this station to the below-ground portion, and board a "G" train towards Brooklyn.

 

There are two subway stations that are proximate to the port. One is Carroll Street, and the other is Smith-Ninth Streets. The Smith-Ninth Streets station is slightly closer to the port. However, it is the highest station in the entire subway system, so it can be a bit of an effort descending to the street. On the other hand, the Carroll Street station is immediately below the surface, and less of an effort to reach the street.

 

One of the highlights of Carroll Street is that just east of the station (in the opposite direction from the port) is the Carroll Street bridge, over the Gowanus Canal. Built in 1889, consisting of single wooden-decked lane for one-way eastbound vehicular traffic and two walkways, it is the oldest of only four remaining retractable bridges in the United States and is an official city landmark. If you have the time it is worth a visit. Another highlight is that just west of the station (in the direction of the port) is Lucali, on of the best pizza restaurants in all of New York City. It is on Henry Street, immediately south of Carroll Street.

 

The difficulty with walking from the Carroll Street station is the need to cross the Gowanus Expressway, or alternatively the Brooklyn-Queens Expressway. To cross the Gowanus Expressway, walk west to Henry Street and turn left (southbound). At Coles Street, one block before Hamilton Avenue and the Gowanus Expressway, you will find the entrance to the pedestrian overpass. Not the nicest overpass, weaving through the roadways, but functional. On the other side you'll descend onto Hamilton Avenue, and there turn left off of the ramp. At the corner turn left onto Luquer Street, and walk one block to Columbia Street. At this corner you will find Defonte's, a fabulous place for sandwiches (to go). Turn left onto Columbia Street, then keep to the right onto Dwight Street. Walk two blocks to Verona Street and the corner of Coffey Park. Walk diagonally through the park to the opposite corner, emerging at the intersection of Richards Street and Pioneer Street. It is four blocks further to the port. Note that at Conover Street there will be a fence and a gate through which you will need to pass through to reach the port area.

 

Instead of using the pedestrian overpass of the Gowanus Expressway, you would walk along Union Street, two blocks north of, and parallel to, Carroll Street. Union Street crosses the Brooklyn-Queens Expressway without the need for using a pedestrian overpass. At the end of Union Street turn left onto Van Brunt Street. Walk south on Van Brunt Street to Pioneer Street. Then turn right onto Pioneer Street. It is three blocks further to the port. Note that at Conover Street there will be a fence and a gate through which you will need to pass through to reach the port area.

 

Should you choose to travel via the Smith-Ninth Street station, then after descending to the street turn right onto West Ninth Street and walk to its end. Note that you will need to cross Hamilton Avenue (under the Gowanus Expressway) at grade, which is a busy and unpleasant to do, and you'll need to be certain that on the other side you're continuing to walk on West Ninth Street. At the end of West Ninth Street turn left onto Columbia Street, go one block and turn right at the next traffic signal onto the walkway between the housing project buildings. Cross Dwight Street and continue walking on a path adjacent to Coffey Park, emerging at the intersection of Richards Street and Pioneer Street. It is four blocks further to the port. Note that at Conover Street there will be a fence and a gate through which you will need to pass through to reach the port area.

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3 hours ago, GTJ said:

No, you're not crazy. If abled-bodied then there is no problem with your plan. I will note preliminarily that I reside in Flushing and have walked to the Brooklyn Cruise Port.

 

From Flushing you will want to travel on the no. 7 train to Court Square station. Use the escalator to descend from the elevated portion of this station to the below-ground portion, and board a "G" train towards Brooklyn.

 

There are two subway stations that are proximate to the port. One is Carroll Street, and the other is Smith-Ninth Streets. The Smith-Ninth Streets station is slightly closer to the port. However, it is the highest station in the entire subway system, so it can be a bit of an effort descending to the street. On the other hand, the Carroll Street station is immediately below the surface, and less of an effort to reach the street.

 

One of the highlights of Carroll Street is that just east of the station (in the opposite direction from the port) is the Carroll Street bridge, over the Gowanus Canal. Built in 1889, consisting of single wooden-decked lane for one-way eastbound vehicular traffic and two walkways, it is the oldest of only four remaining retractable bridges in the United States and is an official city landmark. If you have the time it is worth a visit. Another highlight is that just west of the station (in the direction of the port) is Lucali, on of the best pizza restaurants in all of New York City. It is on Henry Street, immediately south of Carroll Street.

 

The difficulty with walking from the Carroll Street station is the need to cross the Gowanus Expressway, or alternatively the Brooklyn-Queens Expressway. To cross the Gowanus Expressway, walk west to Henry Street and turn left (southbound). At Coles Street, one block before Hamilton Avenue and the Gowanus Expressway, you will find the entrance to the pedestrian overpass. Not the nicest overpass, weaving through the roadways, but functional. On the other side you'll descend onto Hamilton Avenue, and there turn left off of the ramp. At the corner turn left onto Luquer Street, and walk one block to Columbia Street. At this corner you will find Defonte's, a fabulous place for sandwiches (to go). Turn left onto Columbia Street, then keep to the right onto Dwight Street. Walk two blocks to Verona Street and the corner of Coffey Park. Walk diagonally through the park to the opposite corner, emerging at the intersection of Richards Street and Pioneer Street. It is four blocks further to the port. Note that at Conover Street there will be a fence and a gate through which you will need to pass through to reach the port area.

 

Instead of using the pedestrian overpass of the Gowanus Expressway, you would walk along Union Street, two blocks north of, and parallel to, Carroll Street. Union Street crosses the Brooklyn-Queens Expressway without the need for using a pedestrian overpass. At the end of Union Street turn left onto Van Brunt Street. Walk south on Van Brunt Street to Pioneer Street. Then turn right onto Pioneer Street. It is three blocks further to the port. Note that at Conover Street there will be a fence and a gate through which you will need to pass through to reach the port area.

 

Should you choose to travel via the Smith-Ninth Street station, then after descending to the street turn right onto West Ninth Street and walk to its end. Note that you will need to cross Hamilton Avenue (under the Gowanus Expressway) at grade, which is a busy and unpleasant to do, and you'll need to be certain that on the other side you're continuing to walk on West Ninth Street. At the end of West Ninth Street turn left onto Columbia Street, go one block and turn right at the next traffic signal onto the walkway between the housing project buildings. Cross Dwight Street and continue walking on a path adjacent to Coffey Park, emerging at the intersection of Richards Street and Pioneer Street. It is four blocks further to the port. Note that at Conover Street there will be a fence and a gate through which you will need to pass through to reach the port area.

Have you REALLY walked to the Brooklyn cruise terminal from where you live in Flushing?  

And, why consider doing any of this, when a shorter subway ride will get you very close to the pier for the ferry which will bring you to within a few yards of the cruise terminal?

Edited by navybankerteacher
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There is also the MTA B61 bus with a free transfer to the subway (Remember just this Sunday bus/subway fare went to $2.90). 

You could take the B61 to Atlantic Ave and Smith Street and walk the two/three blocks to the Bergen St subway stop for the F/G. 

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On 8/18/2023 at 12:04 PM, Itsnevertoolate said:

hmmm, that's a thought!  I will look at that.  Thanks!

 

On 8/18/2023 at 8:57 AM, navybankerteacher said:

Getting from Flushing to lower Manhattan by subway to access the ferry is easier (close to a half hour shorter time)  than getting to Carroll Street - and it saves you the long walk in Brooklyn.

 

I appreciate your help so much, and I've been looking at your suggestion...do you happen to be familiar with the DUMBO/Fulton ferry stop?  It looks like maybe going to this ferry station is closer to Flushing, and this ferry appears on the schedule to go to Red Hook after Fulton St.  

Is there a reason for not going to this ferry station by subway from Flushing and hopping on here to get to the cruise port?  Is this ferry station more difficult to get to from the subway than the Carlears station?

I'm so leery of simply looking online at maps and public transport schedules...they don't always paint an accurate picture.

And now that you have given me this ferry idea, I'm wondering why Rome2Rio and Google maps didn't give me this as a suggestion when I looked up the route!  The ferry is so much more convenient to the cruise port than any other form of transportation!

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5 hours ago, Brighton Line said:

There is also the MTA B61 bus with a free transfer to the subway

That's the route I would most likely take from Flushing. Reasonably convenient and a free transfer in downtown Brooklyn. Total fare from Flushing to Red Hook: $2.90. I don't quite understand the fascination that some people have with ferry, that some would take the subway across the East River into Manhattan and then have to pay an additional $4.00 (total fare: $6.90!) just to come across the same river to Red Hook. Perhaps if there were an integrated fare (i.e., transfers between subway and ferry) it might be justifiable . . . indeed for most travel I generally avoid the ferry--and stay on the subway--precisely because of the lack of free transfers and the extra fare it would required.

 

All that said, however, I do understand the desire to walk. Absent any disability or excessive baggage, it is not only quite reasonable (slightly over one mile) but also the best way to actually see New York City up close.There are far too many people dependent on driving door-to-door everywhere (be it their own automobile or a hired car), and so one has to admire those who buck the lazy trend and affirmatively desire to walk.

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19 minutes ago, Itsnevertoolate said:

 

[D]o you happen to be familiar with the DUMBO/Fulton ferry stop? It looks like maybe going to this ferry station is closer to Flushing, and this ferry appears on the schedule to go to Red Hook after Fulton St. Is there a reason for not going to this ferry station by subway from Flushing and hopping on here to get to the cruise port? Is this ferry station more difficult to get to from the subway than the Corlears station?

The ferry goes nowhere near Flushing. The ferry landing in DUMBO, at Fulton Street, is not useful when coming from Flushing. Nor is the ferry landing at Corlears Hook any more useful. To travel by ferry, at least partly, requires first having to travel by subway to Flushing to some connecting point, then using one or more ferries from the connecting point to Red Hook. Even though the ferry itself is convenient for travel to the port in Red Hook, none of the connecting points are especially convenient (but that would not be a barrier to using the ferry). Using the ferry might take more time and will involve having to pay multiple fares that will more than double your cost.

 

To use a ferry for a portion of the trip from Flushing, you would travel on the no. 7 train from Main Street to Times Square in Manhattan. Then go up two levels to the downtown platform for the nos. 2 and 3 trains. Travel on either train to the Wall Street station. On the surface walk five blocks crosstown towards the East River, to South Street, then turn right and walk one block downtown to Pier 11. This is where you would board a southbound South Brooklyn ferry, destined for Bay Ridge. Note that you would need to pay an additional $4.00 for a ferry ticket.

 

41 minutes ago, Itsnevertoolate said:

I'm so leery of simply looking online at maps and public transport schedules...they don't always paint an accurate picture. * * * I'm wondering why Rome2Rio and Google maps didn't give me this as a suggestion when I looked up the route!

I can understand a general reluctance to rely upon at least some online maps and schedules. I will note, however, that the resources provided by the New York City Transit Authority for its buses and subways are rather good. Those provided by NYC Ferry are not quite as good. Google Maps did not provide the suggestion to use the ferry because for the particular time you selected for travel from Flushing to Red Hook the route including a ferry may have taken longer than the route including a bus.

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1 hour ago, Itsnevertoolate said:

 

I appreciate your help so much, and I've been looking at your suggestion...do you happen to be familiar with the DUMBO/Fulton ferry stop?  It looks like maybe going to this ferry station is closer to Flushing, and this ferry appears on the schedule to go to Red Hook after Fulton St.  

Is there a reason for not going to this ferry station by subway from Flushing and hopping on here to get to the cruise port?  Is this ferry station more difficult to get to from the subway than the Carlears station?

I'm so leery of simply looking online at maps and public transport schedules...they don't always paint an accurate picture.

And now that you have given me this ferry idea, I'm wondering why Rome2Rio and Google maps didn't give me this as a suggestion when I looked up the route!  The ferry is so much more convenient to the cruise port than any other form of transportation!

I think you are referring to the Dumbo ferry landing on the Brooklyn side of the river - not helpful to you.
 

My suggestion is to take the #7 subway from Flushing to Times Square in Manhattan , then change to Seventh Avenue IRT #2 train (quite well marked) to Wall Street station - which is perhaps a five minute walk to Pier 11 (straight east on Wall Street) for the ferry to Red Hook - which is right next to the Brooklyn Cruise Terminal. Total time on subway will be just  over an hour- add perhaps no more than an hour for the walk to Pier 11, the wait for the ferry, the crossing, the couple of minutes from the Red Hook landing to the cruise terminal.  
 

If your boarding time is 1:00 PM, start out from Flushing at 11:00 AM.

 

Don’t ask about my thoughts about getting around New York by bus - of course, it can be done, but…

 

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3 hours ago, navybankerteacher said:

I think you are referring to the Dumbo ferry landing on the Brooklyn side of the river - not helpful to you.
 

My suggestion is to take the #7 subway from Flushing to Times Square in Manhattan , then change to Seventh Avenue IRT #2 train (quite well marked) to Wall Street station - which is perhaps a five minute walk to Pier 11 (straight east on Wall Street) for the ferry to Red Hook - which is right next to the Brooklyn Cruise Terminal. Total time on subway will be just  over an hour- add perhaps no more than an hour for the walk to Pier 11, the wait for the ferry, the crossing, the couple of minutes from the Red Hook landing to the cruise terminal.  
 

If your boarding time is 1:00 PM, start out from Flushing at 11:00 AM.

 

Don’t ask about my thoughts about getting around New York by bus - of course, it can be done, but…

 

Thank you for your help!  This plan sounds the easiest to me - and very doable with a suitcase. 😊 

Now for the plan to get from Red Hook to JFK after the cruise … I’m thinking ferry, subway, tram.  Before I’m done, I will have utilized every form of public transport, lol!  Thanks again!

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52 minutes ago, Itsnevertoolate said:

Thank you for your help!  This plan sounds the easiest to me - and very doable with a suitcase. 😊 

Now for the plan to get from Red Hook to JFK after the cruise … I’m thinking ferry, subway, tram.  Before I’m done, I will have utilized every form of public transport, lol!  Thanks again!

Take the ferry back to Pier 11 in lower Manhattan, then the #2 train from Wall Street station (where you got off on you way to the cruise terminal) just one stop to Fulton Street, where you change to the A train to Howard Beach where you can change to the JFK AirTrain which stops at all terminals.  
 

p.s. How come you are flying in to LGA and out from JFK?

Edited by navybankerteacher
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32 minutes ago, navybankerteacher said:

Take the ferry back to Pier 11 in lower Manhattan, then the #2 train from Wall Street station (where you got off on you way to the cruise terminal) just one stop to Fulton Street, where you change to the A train to Howard Beach where you can change to the JFK AirTrain which stops at all terminals.  
 

p.s. How come you are flying in to LGA and out from JFK?

To get to Howard Beach, you need the A Train headed to Far Rickaway.

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19 hours ago, Itsnevertoolate said:

Now for the plan to get from Red Hook to JFK after the cruise … I’m thinking ferry, subway, tram.  Before I’m done, I will have utilized every form of public transport, lol!

From Red Hook the immediate goal is to get onto the "A" train. There are at least four ways of doing this.

 

1. Walk to the Carroll Street (or Smith-Ninth Streets) station. Ride the "F" train to Jay Street-MetroTech station, or the "G" train to Hoyt-Schermerhorn station, whichever train arrives first. At either of these stations you will find the "A" train. Fare is $2.90, with free transfer to "A" train.

 

2. Walk to the bus stop on Van Brunt Street at Pioneer Street, and ride the B61 bus to its last stop, on Smith Street between Livingston Street and Fulton Street. Walk one block north (Smith Street changes its name to Jay Street) to Willoughby Street, where you will find the Jay Street-MetroTech station and the "A" train. Fare is $2.90, with free transfer to "A" train if using MetroCard or credit card (if paying cash on bus, additional $2.90 fare payable for "A" train).

 

3. Walk to the adjacent Red Hook ferry landing, and ride the ferry to DUMBO/Fulton Ferry. Then walk about four blocks along Old Fulton Street to Middagh Street (Old Fulton Street changes its name to Cadman Plaza West). On the far side of Middagh Street you will find the High Street-Brooklyn Bridge station and the "A" train. Fare is $4.00 for ferry, plus an additional $2.90 payable for "A" train).

 

4. Walk to the adjacent Red Hook ferry landing, and ride the ferry to Pier 11. Then walk five blocks north along South Street to Fulton Street ("South Street Seaport"), and six blocks crosstown to William Streets. These are all short blocks. There you will find the Fulton Street station and the "A" train. Fare is $4.00 for ferry, plus an additional $2.90 payable for "A" train).

 

Once you find the "A" train, board a train destined for "Far Rockaway-Mott Avenue." Alight at the Howard Beach-JFK station. There you will find the JFK AirTrain service to all terminals. Fare is $8.25 for AirTrain, payable with MetroCard only (additional $1.00 fee to purchase MetroCard).

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3 hours ago, GTJ said:

From Red Hook the immediate goal is to get onto the "A" train. There are at least four ways of doing this.

 

1. Walk to the Carroll Street (or Smith-Ninth Streets) station. Ride the "F" train to Jay Street-MetroTech station, or the "G" train to Hoyt-Schermerhorn station, whichever train arrives first. At either of these stations you will find the "A" train. Fare is $2.90, with free transfer to "A" train.

 

2. Walk to the bus stop on Van Brunt Street at Pioneer Street, and ride the B61 bus to its last stop, on Smith Street between Livingston Street and Fulton Street. Walk one block north (Smith Street changes its name to Jay Street) to Willoughby Street, where you will find the Jay Street-MetroTech station and the "A" train. Fare is $2.90, with free transfer to "A" train if using MetroCard or credit card (if paying cash on bus, additional $2.90 fare payable for "A" train).

 

3. Walk to the adjacent Red Hook ferry landing, and ride the ferry to DUMBO/Fulton Ferry. Then walk about four blocks along Old Fulton Street to Middagh Street (Old Fulton Street changes its name to Cadman Plaza West). On the far side of Middagh Street you will find the High Street-Brooklyn Bridge station and the "A" train. Fare is $4.00 for ferry, plus an additional $2.90 payable for "A" train).

 

4. Walk to the adjacent Red Hook ferry landing, and ride the ferry to Pier 11. Then walk five blocks north along South Street to Fulton Street ("South Street Seaport"), and six blocks crosstown to William Streets. These are all short blocks. There you will find the Fulton Street station and the "A" train. Fare is $4.00 for ferry, plus an additional $2.90 payable for "A" train).

 

Once you find the "A" train, board a train destined for "Far Rockaway-Mott Avenue." Alight at the Howard Beach-JFK station. There you will find the JFK AirTrain service to all terminals. Fare is $8.25 for AirTrain, payable with MetroCard only (additional $1.00 fee to purchase MetroCard).

All this make sense -- if you think long walks in Brooklyn or lower Manhattan are the best way to end a cruise vacation -otherwise, why not look for the easiest way to get to where you want to go?

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On 8/21/2023 at 7:55 PM, navybankerteacher said:

Take the ferry back to Pier 11 in lower Manhattan, then the #2 train from Wall Street station (where you got off on you way to the cruise terminal) just one stop to Fulton Street, where you change to the A train to Howard Beach where you can change to the JFK AirTrain which stops at all terminals.  
 

p.s. How come you are flying in to LGA and out from JFK?

Frequent flier miles...one way tickets were less miles!  When I tell you I am doing this trip on the cheap, I am NOT kidding!  🙂  My flights and my hotel in Flushing were free - that is how I am justifying the 100% upcharge for solo travelling to my husband, lol!  (He has a golf tournament and can't come with me.)

Thank you SO much for sharing all of your knowledge!

Edited by Itsnevertoolate
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