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Iguazo Falls


mare s.

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If you are staying at the Sheraton, they can arrange a driver for you, or so I am told. I contacted them about having someone pick us up at the airport and they have arranged it. I have heard they can arrange drivers to take you to the Brazil side of the falls.

Terri

 

But, be aware that a Brazilian visa is still required. You may be asked for it...and you may not. It could be quite sticky if you are caught without one.

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Does anyone know how I can arrange for a private driver/guide, who can show us the Falls and surrounding area on the Argentina side, and then, take us to the Brazilian side?

 

Thanks,

Shelley

 

You don't need a guide to "show" you the falls. Don't waste your money. The paths are very well marked - follow the crowd and use your little maps from the hotel. You will be looking at great scenery. The "adventure" rides for the park are run by one concession http://www.iguazujungle.com/index_ing.html. Any outside guide or TA will merely book them for you. You can buy your own tickets there or on the website. No hassle at all.

 

You do need a driver to take you to Brazil. Do follow the advice above about hiring the driver from the Sheraton and getting your visa.

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MalibuCA: note that on the Argentine side if you stay at the Sheraton, you will walk everywhere with the exception of the train that takes you to the Devils Throat area. The train is included in the admission to the park. The park itself is very easy to navigate but there is a lot of walking. There are 3 trails or circuits and also Isle St. Martin which has a lot of steps and is accessed by boat (free) from the lower circuit. Depending on flight times, I would allow 2 full days for the Argentine side and perhaps 3/4 day for the Brazil side. A driver/guide would be useful if you are not staying in the park. There is good bus and taxi service from Igauzu to the park, however. The Sheraton should be able to help you find someone to take you to the Brazil side. Helicopter flights are only from the Brazil side and well worth the cost especially since you will have your visa for your cruise to Rio.

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Does anyone know how I can arrange for a private driver/guide, who can show us the Falls and surrounding area on the Argentina side, and then, take us to the Brazilian side?

 

Thanks,

Shelley

 

Shelly: We have arranged a tour with www.iguazuwaterfalls.com, contact was Diego and his cel is 877-987-8482, email ecoiguazu@aol.com. After spending a couple nights in Buenos Aires post cruise, we will fly to Iguazu, 2 nites in a hotel, see falls and "third frontier" (view of three countries coming together), travel to the Brazilian side on the third day for that view then fly on to Rio.

 

If we were not going to Rio, I'd have done it all myself, but feel better about having someone else arrange the package.

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We are just back from a pre cruise trip to Buenos Aires and Iguazu.

We had one night (two days) at the falls.

 

We flew up from BA with just hand luggage, having left our main luggage at the Hilton where we were returning for one further night post falls. We landed at 12 mid day and the driver arranged through the Sheraton was waiting for us with a clear name sign,

We checked into the Sheraton and our room was ready.

 

We went straight out to the falls and did Devils Throat first as there were no lines for the train and then did the Upper Trails. All are really well signposted and there was no need for a guide, it is so easy to walk around and unless you want to have every tiny bit of nature explained to you, it is usually easy to spot things of interest anyway.

We were tired from all our walking so we had a light meal and an early night

Our flight next day left at 1830 so we spent the morning walking the upper trail and a driver arranged by the hotel took us over to the Brazil side at noon, came back for us at 1600 and took us to the airport. It all worked very well and we saw a lot.

The Brazilian side is quite commercial compared to the Argentinian side and again no guide is needed. (We did not need visas but it seemed those who did were getting over no problem)

 

We just walked everywhere, did not do some boat trips and have many wonderful memories through hundreds of photos we got - by the way, you get great rainbows and sunset shots from the Argentinian side in the evening. I gather you do not see them on the Brazilian side

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Did you have problems getting over to the Brazil side without a Visa? Did you fly out of Argentina or Brazil? If you fly out of Brazil do you need a Visa?:confused:

 

 

If a visa is required by Brazil for your nationality/passport, you MUST have one to cross to the Brazilian side as there is a formal border post where passports are checked. Its not optional, but is so worth it to explore both sides for very different perspectives of these magnificent falls.

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We are just back from a pre cruise trip to Buenos Aires and Iguazu.

We had one night (two days) at the falls.

 

We flew up from BA with just hand luggage, having left our main luggage at the Hilton where we were returning for one further night post falls. We landed at 12 mid day and the driver arranged through the Sheraton was waiting for us with a clear name sign,

We checked into the Sheraton and our room was ready.

 

We went straight out to the falls and did Devils Throat first as there were no lines for the train and then did the Upper Trails. All are really well signposted and there was no need for a guide, it is so easy to walk around and unless you want to have every tiny bit of nature explained to you, it is usually easy to spot things of interest anyway.

We were tired from all our walking so we had a light meal and an early night

Our flight next day left at 1830 so we spent the morning walking the upper trail and a driver arranged by the hotel took us over to the Brazil side at noon, came back for us at 1600 and took us to the airport. It all worked very well and we saw a lot.

The Brazilian side is quite commercial compared to the Argentinian side and again no guide is needed. (We did not need visas but it seemed those who did were getting over no problem)

 

We just walked everywhere, did not do some boat trips and have many wonderful memories through hundreds of photos we got - by the way, you get great rainbows and sunset shots from the Argentinian side in the evening. I gather you do not see them on the Brazilian side

 

My everlasting memories of my wonderful time at the falls are the rainbows around every corner in the late afternoon, the amazing butterflies and incredible sunsets AND sunrises (which is why a Falls View room at the Sheration is the only place to stay!)

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Did you have problems getting over to the Brazil side without a Visa? Did you fly out of Argentina or Brazil? If you fly out of Brazil do you need a Visa?:confused:

 

We did not require Visas so had no problems. We flew in and out of the Argentinian airport

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Does anyone know how I can arrange for a private driver/guide, who can show us the Falls and surrounding area on the Argentina side, and then, take us to the Brazilian side?

 

Thanks,

Shelley

 

You really dont need a guide. Stay at the Sheraton and you can walk out the back to the head of the trails on the Argentinian side. The Sheraton will also arrange for a car and driver to take you through the Brazilian border to the tourist centre where you can hop on the Brazilian park bus. Your driver will wait for you (for 2-3 hours which is all you need) and take you back to the Sheraton. On the way, he'll stop and let you take photos where Argentina, Brazil and Paraguay all meet.

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It is true that US cits need a visa to enter Brasil; however, I would be tremendously surprised if US cits staying at the Sheraton (on the AR side) couldn't get over to visit the Brasilian side of the falls for a day without a Brasilian visa by utilizing a savvy taxi or tour guide driver and paying the appropriate tip, the exact amount of which can be negotiated ahead of time. Last time I checked a Brasilian visa cost a US cit $140.

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It is true that US cits need a visa to enter Brasil; however, I would be tremendously surprised if US cits staying at the Sheraton (on the AR side) couldn't get over to visit the Brasilian side of the falls for a day without a Brasilian visa by utilizing a savvy taxi or tour guide driver and paying the appropriate tip, the exact amount of which can be negotiated ahead of time. Last time I checked a Brasilian visa cost a US cit $140.

There have been a number of warnings on CC, and elsewhere, of the consequences of being caught without a visa where one is required. If anyone wishes to take the risk...

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There have been a number of warnings on CC, and elsewhere, of the consequences of being caught without a visa where one is required. If anyone wishes to take the risk...

Can you reference these warnings specifically and exactly what are the consequences according to them> it would be helpful to know.

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There are at least five references in this thread, and others elsewhere, that a search will turn up.

 

If anyone wants to visit the Brazillian side of the falls 'without a Brasilian visa by utilizing a savvy taxi or tour guide driver and paying the appropriate tip' (tip=bribe?) then fine. They take the risk of ruining their entire trip and it costing a lot more than the visa would.

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There are at least five references in this thread, and others elsewhere, that a search will turn up.

 

If anyone wants to visit the Brazillian side of the falls 'without a Brasilian visa by utilizing a savvy taxi or tour guide driver and paying the appropriate tip' (tip=bribe?) then fine. They take the risk of ruining their entire trip and it costing a lot more than the visa would.

Sorry, I would have appreciated and still would appreciate more specifics on your advice that the threat of general gloom and doom ( i.e. capture;imprisonment or heavy fine) is accurate. Searching is not that easy (at least for me), but I followed your recommendation to do my own search to substantiate your warning, but I found contrary advice.

1. post 18 on http://boards.cruisecritic.com/showthread.php?p=31794229&highlight=visa+for+iguazu#post31794229

2. post 12 on http://boards.cruisecritic.com/showthread.php?t=1117018&highlight=visa+iguazu

Perhaps someone employed as a professional tour coordinator including one from at the Sheraton Hotel or Hotel de Cataratas on the Brasilian side can give a more definitive answer. If I were headed to Iguazu, I would seek out some more definitive advice.

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Neither of the posts you quote offers contrary advice.

 

The first says 'I think some tours will take you onto the Brazilian side of the falls but without the need for a visa if you stay in the park area near the falls-- do ask in advance (my emphasis).

 

The second says 'All taxi drivers and the hotel tour desk offer to take you to the Brazilian side. They charge more if you do not have a Brazilian visa. They say for "fees", but in all likelihood it is to "tip" the border guards. It's done all the time. Up to you if you want to chance it' (my emphasis).

Post #20 in your first referenced thread says 'Be advised that while some taxi drivers or tour operators will take you across into Brazil without a Visa this practice is always illegal and could result in a large fine or imprisonment. Enforcement by Brazilian authorities in Iguazu fluctuates, ranging from non-existent to very strict. If you choose to take a chance and go across with a driver who probably bribed a border guard, by all means don't have an accident or get arrested' (my emphasis)

 

There would seem to be little point in continuing this dialogue: I don't enter countries illegally, I wouldn't bribe anyone to help me do so, and I wouldn't suggest that others take the risk. If Brazil requires a visa, then a visa should be obtained.

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This topic has been discussed ad infinitum on the Trip Advisor boards. Brazilian law is clear enough: US citizens are required to have a visa to enter Brazil.

 

The Confusion around border crossing at Iguazu is due to intermittent enforcement of the visa requirement for tourists visiting the falls. When I was younger and stupider I went across twice without incident. One time to visit the falls and another time for an evening on the town. I could have gone to Paraguay while I was over there but decided against it. I was turned back on a third attempt to cross. I do not think I will attempt an illegal crossing again, although the hippie-counter culture part of me enjoyed the thrill as much as the falls.

 

I have not verified this, but I have been told by guides that tourists without visas are sometimes arrested and subject to large fines when attempting to leave Brazil.

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Thanks for your advice and clarification! I prefer to fly out of Brazil to Lima and back to the US - most direct flight compared flying out of Argentina with 2 stops! I rather pay the $140 for the convenience of flying out of Brazil and not having to fly back to Buenos Aires or a 3 stop back home! :rolleyes:

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It is true that US cits need a visa to enter Brasil; however, I would be tremendously surprised if US cits staying at the Sheraton (on the AR side) couldn't get over to visit the Brasilian side of the falls for a day without a Brasilian visa by utilizing a savvy taxi or tour guide driver and paying the appropriate tip, the exact amount of which can be negotiated ahead of time. Last time I checked a Brasilian visa cost a US cit $140.

 

Astounding! I dont know of a border crossing on this planet where you can tip your way through and I definitely wouldnt try this at this border!

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Astounding! I dont know of a border crossing on this planet where you can tip your way through and I definitely wouldnt try this at this border!

I agree that you don't know about it, but I hope you will agree that that doesnt prove conclusively it is not still a fairly common practice. I have not read any postings from anyone who has actually suffered as a result of crossing into Brasil on a day tour without a Brasilian visa. Perhaps it no longer is commonplace. That may be true. It was at one time. Tour guides will be in a position to know.

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I do suggest that you have the visa. And do not even think about bride. Would you like any foreigner to visit your country and pay bride to your authorities.

 

And should you have any problem I am sure the “taxi driver” will leave you alone.

 

Shouldn’t you be able to get the visa, stay at the Argentinean side. You will see a lot and have a lot of fun.

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We just returned from Iguazu Falls. We were caught off guard by the cost of bottle water. It is so warm and humid, that you really need to drink plenty of water.

 

Be prepared to pay $4+ for small bottle - $10 1 liter (american, not pesos). Just a heads up.

 

The Falls are not to be missed. We were only on the Argentinian side and the Falls were amazing. We stayed at the Sheradon and spent the day exploring the Falls but so enjoyed sitting on the balcony, looking at the Falls in the evenings after the Falls closed and in the early mornings.

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