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Tipping in Oz and NZ......


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Generally speaking, tipping is not common -- but, having said that, more and more travelers DO leave some sort of a tip, just as they do at home.

 

I found that tips are appreciated as a gesture of being pleased with the service. I seriously doubt that anyone is going to chase after you, shouting "come back, come back!!"

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Can anyone advise me on this in regards to dining? I have no idea whether tipping is the norm or is considered somewhat of an insult....

Thanks in advance, Lynda

 

Tipping is not the norm in Australia/NZ, therefore we never tip. Our waiters do not rely on tips for their wages.

 

Unfortunately, the practice is creeping in, with tip bowls on counters etc.

 

However, it is not considered an insult, if you wish to tip.

 

You willl receive excellent friendly service, whether you tip or not!

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Generally speaking, tipping is not common -- but, having said that, more and more travelers DO leave some sort of a tip, just as they do at home.

 

I found that tips are appreciated as a gesture of being pleased with the service. I seriously doubt that anyone is going to chase after you, shouting "come back, come back!!"[/quote]

 

Your comment made me smile. We didn't realise that some footpath Skycaps were independent to the airline, where you didn't tip, until we heard loudly, as we walked away, "THANK YOU, THANK YOU VERY MUCH". As we didn't want our luggage to end up in China, we asked the airline check-in clerk, who said the usual "tipping is discretionary", but explained the difference in Skycaps. We went back and tipped and never used a Skycap again. :)

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Can anyone advise me on this in regards to dining? I have no idea whether tipping is the norm or is considered somewhat of an insult....

Thanks in advance, Lynda

Kia ora Lynda, Tipping in New Zealand is not customary nor expected and in most cases considered 'offensive'.

Unfortunately over the years, it has become more a demand in certain areas within the Tourism Industry. Don't feel obliged to 'tip', in New Zealand the minimum wage of $12.50 NZD/hour is statutory as opposed to the US, and besides should you feel compelled to 'tip', 'offer', 'donate' something, ask the facility/activity for a recommended 'charity' you can contribute to instead? Amongst Indigenous operators/facilities it is considered very offensive to accept 'tips'. The only experience in Australia, I can recall was in Cairns at a Resort and the response I received was not good when I tried to 'tip' ... hope this helps!

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However, it is not considered an insult, if you wish to tip.

 

You willl receive excellent friendly service, whether you tip or not!

 

I should clarify that the above comment was made in relation to restaurants, where there is a line on the bill, which allows for a tipping amount.

 

It could be considered an insult if you offered a tip to a person, except for those in the tourism industry, used to overseas visitors.

 

I love the way our taxi drivers offer the small change back from a taxi fare (after putting all our luggage in the boot and taking it out and putting it on the footpath).

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Can anyone advise me on this in regards to dining? I have no idea whether tipping is the norm or is considered somewhat of an insult....

Thanks in advance, Lynda

 

As several people have said, tipping is becoming more common in the tourism industry. However, it is not part of the norm for our cultures (both Australia and NZ) and there is no need for it to become so.

 

Unlike the US,people in Oz and NZ are paid a good minimum wage and are not dependent on tips for their income, so there is no need to tip.

 

You will see that many restaurants add a "service charge" to the bill, which is said to be instead of a tip (but sometimes I suspect that management takes that too).

 

Apart from that, the only time we tip is when rounding up a taxi fare - telling the driver to keep the change.

 

Please don't tip indiscriminately, as we don't want tipping to become part of our culture. However, if you have received service "over and above" what you expected, tip by all means, but a "Thank you" and a smile would still be considered sufficient.

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As several people have said, tipping is becoming more common in the tourism industry. However, it is not part of the norm for our cultures (both Australia and NZ) and there is no need for it to become so.

 

Unlike the US,people in Oz and NZ are paid a good minimum wage and are not dependent on tips for their income, so there is no need to tip.

 

You will see that many restaurants add a "service charge" to the bill, which is said to be instead of a tip (but sometimes I suspect that management takes that too).

 

Apart from that, the only time we tip is when rounding up a taxi fare - telling the driver to keep the change.

 

 

 

Please don't tip indiscriminately, as we don't want tipping to become part of our culture. However, if you have received service "over and above" what you expected, tip by all means, but a "Thank you" and a smile would still be considered sufficient.

 

Kia ora Celle ... I agree with your response ... 'a smile or a friendly Thank you' is priceless! and in New Zealand, we were always known for our hospitality and kindness toward visitors, whether it be in a restaurant/tour activity/facility AS, from what I have personally experienced, the same applies in Australia. The 'tipping' matter is considered by many in NZ a 'NOT Downunderish thing' - if there is such a word. I certainly don't wish to see this become part of our culture.

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We just returned from our first trip to Oz. Tipping is so engrained here in the States that I actually felt guilty at first to not leave a tip! It was a bit difficult discerning when a tip might be appreciated, a tip was purely discretionary, and when it would actually offend.

 

The only tip we ever left was on a tour in SYD. They had a very discrete tip jar on the bus, and they were quite good so I didn't mind tipping. I was prepared to tip on other tours, fortunately some Aussies on the tours were dropped off first and I didn't see a tip exchange hands. Our very first evening in Oz (Melbourne), the waiter actually said "Please don't leave a tip, it will be pocketed by the owner". Must have been some bad blood between owner and employees. This was at an internationally known restaurant.

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. Our very first evening in Oz (Melbourne), the waiter actually said "Please don't leave a tip, it will be pocketed by the owner". Must have been some bad blood between owner and employees. This was at an internationally known restaurant.

 

That is probably what caused the bad blood - nasty way to operate.

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I see tipping a fair bit in Sydney. Most restaurants have tipping bowls and many locals do, there's provision for tips on dockets, a few restaurants automatically impose extra surcharges to groups in lieu of tips, taxi drivers frequently expect a tip, or just round up themselves.

 

That said, none need to rely on tips unlike in the US so you can go with an open conscience without tipping.

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Thank you all for your responses. As Kenish said, it does feel strange NOT to tip....I'm originally from England and when I go back it's a hard habit to break!! We are so looking forward to spending time, albeit way to short a time, in OZ and NZ..........smiling and a hearty "thank you" will work just fine for us!

Thanks again, Lynda

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I was in Australia for 2 months. Went to many restaurants, took tours, took taxis, etc. The only time that I saw anyone tip was on a tour where a group of people from Wisconsin who were traveling as a group give the guide an envelope. the rest of us (Americans, Brits, Australians) did not give the guides a tip.

 

That is one of the many wonderful things about Australia. Don't ruin it.

 

DON

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What you have to remember here in Australia you pay more for food than what you would in the States. You probably think our food is cheap because of the exchange rate.

 

Us Aussies aren't used to tipping, and we like that we don't have to tip, mind you at times it wouldn't be such a bad thing, as you may get better service. But overall most eatery places give good service.

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What you have to remember here in Australia you pay more for food than what you would in the States. You probably think our food is cheap because of the exchange rate.

 

Us Aussies aren't used to tipping, and we like that we don't have to tip, mind you at times it wouldn't be such a bad thing, as you may get better service. But overall most eatery places give good service.

 

I would have to agree with our 'Ozzie' brothers across the 'ditch' ... tipping is quite okay in those countries where it is part and parcel of the culture, but 'down under' a lot of people are still trying to come to terms with this, and opinion is more against than for. After saying that, I am not implying that it is wrong in those places its accepted.

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Guest xywolap

Service costs are included in your charge here and "tips are not expected".

 

Waiters and the like hovering around sweating on a tip is akin to begging and that is not an atmosphere we like nor would like to see encouraged here. A pleasant and sincere thank you for the service and quality given is all that is expected.

 

I wish cruises here (Aust) would just include the staff wages in the fare so all the hoo-haa over tipping and begging could be put aside so we could just enjoy the holiday with a minimum of fuss.

 

If you feel inclined to leave a trail of money everywhere you visit please do so but it is not expected.

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  • 2 weeks later...
Generally speaking, tipping is not common -- but, having said that, more and more travelers DO leave some sort of a tip, just as they do at home.

 

I found that tips are appreciated as a gesture of being pleased with the service. I seriously doubt that anyone is going to chase after you, shouting "come back, come back!!"

 

Actually they might because they think you have left your money behind.

 

Tips are not common.

 

In some cases people are not allowed to take money or gifts from customers.

 

If you feel bad about not tipping, do as others have suggested and give them a smile and a thank you. Tell them how good it was, and why and tell them you are going to tell all your friends about it and come on here and tell the rest of the world :D

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Actually they might because they think you have left your money behind.

 

Tips are not common.

 

I would say tips are fairly common in restaurants and taxis, and the evidence of that can be seen in tip jars and space on bills. I've had taxi drivers compulsorily add tips on on more than one occasion. In hotels they're common enough, although that doesn't mean everyone leaves them. Nobody's going to look at you oddly for leaving a tip.

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I would say tips are fairly common in restaurants and taxis, and the evidence of that can be seen in tip jars and space on bills. I've had taxi drivers compulsorily add tips on on more than one occasion. In hotels they're common enough, although that doesn't mean everyone leaves them. Nobody's going to look at you oddly for leaving a tip.

 

We travel frequently throughout Australia and tips are definitely not common.

 

However, I agree Sydney is different, being a big city, with lots of international tourists.

 

But, even there, I never tip, because I would hate to see the custom grow in Australia.

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Actually, on the subject of tips. I hate it when a customer gives me a tip. I usually tell them a thank you and smile is enough. We have a charity collection container on the counter top and I put the tip into the jar and tell them thank you from the charity.

 

They are usually pleased with that.

 

Please don't tip, just treat the person like a human and that is tip enough.

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Actually' date=' on the subject of tips. I hate it when a customer gives me a tip. I usually tell them a thank you and smile is enough. We have a charity collection container on the counter top and I put the tip into the jar and tell them thank you from the charity.[/quote']Wonderful! Good on you!
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Actually' date=' on the subject of tips. I hate it when a customer gives me a tip. I usually tell them a thank you and smile is enough. We have a charity collection container on the counter top and I put the tip into the jar and tell them thank you from the charity.

 

They are usually pleased with that.

 

Please don't tip, just treat the person like a human and that is tip enough.[/quote']

 

Well done, Eileen.

 

If I have small change from a purchase, I'm happy to put it in the charity collection container, if there is one there.

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  • 2 weeks later...

I traveled for 2 months in Australia - with my wife and on tours. The only time I ever saw anyone tip was on a tour with a bunch of people from Madison, WI. The rest of us including Brits and Australians did not tip.

 

It is great going to a country where people do not always have their hands out. Don't ruin it.

 

DON

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  • 5 weeks later...

Another vote for the "Please don't tip whilst in Australia".

 

Obviously if you tip it wouldn't be knocked back, but it is not expected unless you have received exemplary service. I have worked as a waitress and rarely got tips, that was fine. I also preferred it that way - I knew what I was getting paid per hour ( a much better wage than in the US ) and I knew that I would get paid that even if I wasn't the world's best waitress (we're all new once aren't we, and whilst we are learning we make mistakes)

 

So please don't tip unless it is truly called for. Not just for doing what they were already paid to do.

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