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Melbourne: NY Times Tips, Ideas, Insights?


TLCOhio
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From the New York Times Travel Section coming this weekend, they will have this headline: 36 HOURS Melbourne with these highlights: “Melbourne, long seen as Australia’s second city, is runner-up no more after officially edging past Sydney in population for the first time in more than a century. But if Sydney is the extroverted showboat full of grand gestures (opera house! beaches!), arts- and food-loving Melbourne plays it cool. Visitors will discover odd and wonderful surprises, sometimes hidden in the laneways (what Aussies call alleys), including spaces like a church caretaker’s cottage turned cocktail bar or a limestone art gallery tucked amid rustling gum trees.”

 

This detailed profile features a number of restaurants and bars, attractions, museums and live music, shopping, where to stay and getting around options and potentials.  

 

Here some added details that hit me as interesting background:  "Melbourne’s city center was a ghost town at night, until a relaxation of liquor licensing in the 1990s brought new life to the laneways.  Flinders Lane was the center of Melbourne’s rag trade, as its textile industry was known, until production moved offshore starting in the 1960s. Today, it’s home to a number of gorgeous shops and restaurants.  On weekends, Chinatown’s sidewalks are a crawl of families out for yum cha (what Australians call dim sum, from the Cantonese for “drink tea”). Melbourne’s Chinatown is the Southern Hemisphere’s oldest, established in the 1850s during the Victorian gold rush, when tens of thousands of Chinese immigrants came seeking their fortune.  Lygon Street, in Carlton, is Melbourne’s original Little Italy, where postwar migrants installed some of the city’s first espresso machines and imported Italian goods."

 

Reactions, corrections, likes and dislikes about this reporting by Tacey Rychter, an editor for NY Times’s Travel section who lived in Melbourne for nearly 30 years and travels there regularly.

 

Did not realize that Melbourne has passed Sydney in population.  Right?

 

Full story at:

https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2023/11/30/travel/things-to-do-melbourne-australia.html

 

THANKS!  Enjoy!  Terry in Ohio   

 

Sydney to NZ/Auckland Adventure, live/blog 2014 sampling/details with many exciting visuals and key highlights.  On page 23, post #571, see a complete index for all of the pictures, postings.  Now at 246,637 views.

https://boards.cruisecritic.com/topic/1896175-solstice-live-australianzhawaii-many-pix’s-jan-20-feb-3/

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59 minutes ago, Ozwoody said:

Um not sure Melbourne has, last I heard was it was catching up, but still some 300000 or so short.🤔

 

I did hear it had.  Maybe because so many Sydney people have shifted to Qld.  My new neighbours, who paid Sydney prices, come from Sydney,

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Just now, MMDown Under said:

I did hear it had.  Maybe because so many Sydney people have shifted to Qld.  My new neighbours, who paid Sydney prices, come from Sydney,

I'm spending four nights in Melbourne CBD after my cruise. I used to stay at the CWA in Toorak.  What a beautiful street full of very posh houses. Close to tram and bus.  You could walk along the river in to the tennis/CBD. I love Melbourne's Australia Day festivities. 

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11 minutes ago, MMDown Under said:

I did hear it had.  Maybe because so many Sydney people have shifted to Qld.  My new neighbours, who paid Sydney prices, come from Sydney,

You could be right, there's a few of the beggers moved into our neck of the Brisbane woods.

Maybe if it keeps up Brisbane will overtake them.

Oh GOD FORBID😟

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The population of both cities depends on what publication you read or website you look at and how the population is determined. 

 

Melbourne Overtakes Sydney in Population

 

Melbourne Population  5.11 million

Sydney Population       5.28 million

 

Melb Population 2   5,235,407

Syd Population 2    5,120,894

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8 hours ago, possum52 said:

The population of both cities depends on what publication you read or website you look at and how the population is determined. 

 

Melbourne Overtakes Sydney in Population

 

Melbourne Population  5.11 million

Sydney Population       5.28 million

 

Melb Population 2   5,235,407

Syd Population 2    5,120,894

Whichever way you count it, the way Albo is going, it'll be neck and neck for years.

Might be time for a sea or tree change.

 

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21 hours ago, possum52 said:

The population of both cities depends on what publication you read or website you look at and how the population is determined.

Melbourne Overtakes Sydney in Population

Melbourne Population  5.11 million

Sydney Population       5.28 million

Melb Population 2   5,235,407

Syd Population 2    5,120,894

 

Appreciate ALL of these good and interesting follow-ups, including about the different ways to look at and measure population. Metro versus city??   Keep it coming with this excellent sharing. 

 

For that NY Times profile on Melbourne, below is the interesting visual used to open and illustrate this article:

image.thumb.png.d1def54d5ab898da5e7df00aa5728c65.png

 

THANKS!  Enjoy!  Terry in Ohio

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5 minutes ago, TLCOhio said:

 

Appreciate ALL of these good and interesting follow-ups, including about the different ways to look at and measure population. Metro versus city??   Keep it coming with this excellent sharing. 

 

For that NY Times profile on Melbourne, below is the interesting visual used to open and illustrate this article:

image.thumb.png.d1def54d5ab898da5e7df00aa5728c65.png

 

THANKS!  Enjoy!  Terry in Ohio

Thanks Terry, all the websites included the metro areas so I'm not sure why the differences. The photo is interesting, the CBD (central business district) on the right and the newer area of Southbank on the left. This area was originally industrial and part of South Melbourne. In the 1990s, an urban renewal program of more densely populated apartment and office buildings was started. Along the river, Crown Casino and its associated hotels was built. This complex also includes shops and many restaurants and other entertainment venues as well as the casino. This started the opening up and revamping of the area to the west of the casino using the Yarra River banks for further restaurants, bars, entertainment venues, an exhibition centre and theatres plus shopping, hotels and apartment complexes. 

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This is what I found.

 Melbourne has overtaken Sydney to become Australia's largest city by population — thanks to a technicality. The borders of the city, which is the capital of the state of Victoria, have been redrawn to include the district of Melton, allowing Melbourne to leapfrog Sydney, 

 

However Sydney Greater Capital city is still around 270,000 larger than Melbourne Greater Capital city.

 

 

Capital City Populations, June 2022 Greater Capital City Significant Urban Area
Sydney 5,297,089 4,892,217
Melbourne 5,031,195 4,929,201
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The article says Aussies call Yum Cha, dim sum.  Pretty sure we call it yum cha.  I know we do in Sydney. Also, the article says Aussies call laneways,  alleys.  In Melbourne CBD, they are referred to as laneways - certainly all the tourism articles I read promoting Melbourne call them laneways.

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21 minutes ago, aussielozzie18 said:

The article says Aussies call Yum Cha, dim sum.  Pretty sure we call it yum cha.  I know we do in Sydney. Also, the article says Aussies call laneways,  alleys.  In Melbourne CBD, they are referred to as laneways - certainly all the tourism articles I read promoting Melbourne call them laneways.

Actually, you have misread the article. It says that Aussies call it Yum Cha (that we (Americans) call Dim Sum) similarly we Aussies say Laneways that Americans call Alleys

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8 minutes ago, yarramar said:

Actually, you have misread the article. It says that Aussies call it Yum Cha (that we (Americans) call Dim Sum) similarly we Aussies say Laneways that Americans call Alleys

I was referring to what Terry from Ohio posted in quotes from the article.

 

On 12/1/2023 at 8:55 AM, TLCOhio said:

From the New York Times Visitors will discover odd and wonderful surprises, sometimes hidden in the laneways (what Aussies call alleys)

 

 On weekends, Chinatown’s sidewalks are a crawl of families out for yum cha (what Australians call dim sum, from the Cantonese for “drink tea”). 

 

Reactions, corrections, likes and dislikes about this reporting by Tacey Rychter, an editor for NY Times’s Travel section who lived in Melbourne for nearly 30 years and travels there regularly.

 

 

 

Full story at:

https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2023/11/30/travel/things-to-do-melbourne-australia.html

 

THANKS!  Enjoy!  Terry in Ohio   

 

Sydney to NZ/Auckland Adventure, live/blog 2014 sampling/details with many exciting visuals and key highlights.  On page 23, post #571, see a complete index for all of the pictures, postings.  Now at 246,637 views.

https://boards.cruisecritic.com/topic/1896175-solstice-live-australianzhawaii-many-pix’s-jan-20-feb-3/

 

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33 minutes ago, aussielozzie18 said:

I was referring to what Terry from Ohio posted in quotes from the article.

 

 

  1. Again misread. -"in the laneways (What Aussies call alleys)" This means that an Aussie calls an alley a laneway. Similarly an Aussie calls dim sum, "Yum Cha"

 

I actually thought the same when I read it, but thought "that can't be right"and then reread it and it makes sense

Edited by yarramar
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