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Misconceptions


shipgeeks
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A novice cruiser mentioned to me that she felt obliged to order a drink in any lounge she went into.  She loves music and dancing, but hesitated to sit, or to barhop, without buying more drinks.  Not true!  No obligation at all.  Typically, if a server offers and you decline, he will place a little paper napkin on your table; this is a signal to other servers that you have been asked.

She also said she was told by another passenger that everyone must vacate the ship in every port, and that no food of any kind is available while in a port.  Also not true in the least (although some food venues, usually main dining room, will not be open for lunch).

Have you come across other misconceptions?

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The major misconception I have encountered (and fully researched for accuracy in most cases) is the belief that “premium/luxury” cruises are more expensive than “mass market” ones.

 

While it’s true that the published cabin fares for similar itineraries/dates between the various industry segments may be significantly different, the true cost comparison should be based on the “net daily rate.”

 

The “net daily rate” is the total of all required and optionally desired trip cost items (not just the cruise fare) divided by the number of days in your cruise vacation. And for folks who fly to embarkation, enjoy soda plus alcohol and specialty restaurants, use internet and do excursions (plus other stuff), having some or all of it included in your base cabin fare is quite different than being nickel-dimed for everything on a mass market ship. 
 

And then, there’s what you don’t get on premium/luxury ships: thousands of passengers, smoky casinos, amusement parks on floating apartment houses, pesky photographers, incessant announcements, phony art auctions, lines for everything, lecturers who are salesmen rather than teachers……

 

So, next time you’re planning a cruise, particularly an intercontinental one where airfare is a necessary consideration, base your comparison of cruise lines on the complete “net daily rate.”

 

 

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We have several couple friends that have never been on a cruise and always say they never will because:

 

1) You have to line up for everything...  Perhaps it is our preferred cruise line - Viking - but I have never lined up for anything on Viking.  Yes, you might walk into the restaurant and wait 2 minutes to be seated but that is every restaurant on land too!

 

2) Only old people go on cruises.  Yes, there is a demographic that probably enjoys cruising more than others because they are retired and have the money to travel, but that does not mean you are on a floating seniors home.  We see all age groups on our cruises.

 

3) Cruise ships are too structured and you have to follow a schedule.  Well, yes, you are only in port for so many hours, or potentially overnight, but you don't have to do anything that the ship offers.  You can do your own thing and often we do.  Or, you can stay on board and enjoy the almost empty ship because everyone else is off in port.

 

And I totally agree with the above from Flatbush Flyer and shipgeeks

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4 hours ago, CDNPolar said:

We have several couple friends that have never been on a cruise and always say they never will because:

I find it interesting when people who have no direct experience on a given subject also are the experts on that subject to support a distorted view that they have on that subject.  Happens all too frequently....

 

Ignorance is bliss, I guess.  

Edited by leaveitallbehind
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Flatbush Flyer, You have reminded me of one I used to hear from colleagues:  "I wish I could afford to cruise like you do.  We can only do our Ocean City vacations." 

Condo $$

Drive two or more cars, or rent a large car, in order to take all the beach furniture and other stuff $$

Brunch at Denny's $

Burgers and ice creams $

Dinner at Olive Garden $$

Movie $

Water park rides $$

Parking $

Groceries for the condo $

And so on......

 

 

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Biggest misconception is that cruising is not gay friendly.  As a gay couple, we have been  on a variety of cruise ships over the last 30 years ( we cruise probably twice a year).  Never had any problems with anyone.  Almost every ship we  have been on has had some sort of LGBT meet up.  If they didn't, it was really easy to find "Fellow Travelers" and just meet up for drinks on our own.

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2 hours ago, leaveitallbehind said:

I find it interesting when people who have no direct experience on a given subject also are the experts on that subject to support a distorted view that they have on that subject.

It's called the Dunning–Kruger effect.

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On 12/2/2023 at 2:49 PM, Flatbush Flyer said:

The major misconception I have encountered (and fully researched for accuracy in most cases) is the belief that “premium/luxury” cruises are more expensive than “mass market” ones.

 

While it’s true that the published cabin fares for similar itineraries/dates between the various industry segments may be significantly different, the true cost comparison should be based on the “net daily rate.”

 

The “net daily rate” is the total of all required and optionally desired trip cost items (not just the cruise fare) divided by the number of days in your cruise vacation. And for folks who fly to embarkation, enjoy soda plus alcohol and specialty restaurants, use internet and do excursions (plus other stuff), having some or all of it included in your base cabin fare is quite different than being nickel-dimed for everything on a mass market ship. 
 

And then, there’s what you don’t get on premium/luxury ships: thousands of passengers, smoky casinos, amusement parks on floating apartment houses, pesky photographers, incessant announcements, phony art auctions, lines for everything, lecturers who are salesmen rather than teachers……

 

So, next time you’re planning a cruise, particularly an intercontinental one where airfare is a necessary consideration, base your comparison of cruise lines on the complete “net daily rate.”

 

 

Why focus on "net daily rate"? Just focus on the overall total. I don't really care what I'm paying each day, I'm more concerned with what is coming out of my pocket. By comparing all of the costs (i.e. the things that I know that I'm going to be purchasing) I have found that more upscale lines are indeed a possibility for us, so one day we might book one. (And many don't mind the things that you do so the smoky casinos and crowds aren't something to avoid.)

 

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1 hour ago, sparks1093 said:

Why focus on "net daily rate"? Just focus on the overall total. I don't really care what I'm paying each day, I'm more concerned with what is coming out of my pocket. By comparing all of the costs (i.e. the things that I know that I'm going to be purchasing) I have found that more upscale lines are indeed a possibility for us, so one day we might book one. (And many don't mind the things that you do so the smoky casinos and crowds aren't something to avoid.)

 

Too late to edit, but if one is comparing cruises of varying lengths then knowing the net daily rate would certainly have a purpose, since it gives a more accurate unit price. Focusing on the overall total is only good if one is comparing cruises of the same length.

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3 hours ago, sparks1093 said:

Why focus on "net daily rate"? Just focus on the overall total. I don't really care what I'm paying each day, I'm more concerned with what is coming out of my pocket. By comparing all of the costs (i.e. the things that I know that I'm going to be purchasing) I have found that more upscale lines are indeed a possibility for us, so one day we might book one. (And many don't mind the things that you do so the smoky casinos and crowds aren't something to avoid.)

 

You may want to rethink “net daily rate,” which is far more accurate than “bottom line” in comparing different cruise companies and their products. If you don’t fully understand this, do a test comparison of two similar cruises with one being one day longer than the other.

As for smoky casinos and crowds, “many” DO mind them and end up unhappily surprised if they didn’t do their comprehensive research beforehand. 

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I think a good number of new cruisers come in thinking the ticket price is the TOTAL PRICE.  That is, they aren't aware that drinks, excursions, etc. will add to their bill.  Hopefully they realize this before they cruise.  

 

We've been trying to get my father-in-law to try cruising, but he won't because he's convinced "there's nothing to do", and I'll be stuck on the ship all week. 

 

Some people who aren't new just don't read /don't inform themselves about details.  Example:  I saw a travel blogger on You Tube who was complaining that "no one told him" the Dog House and Mexican place on Wonder were no-charge ... likewise, he didn't know that Johnny Rockets serves free breakfast on Oasis class ships.  This information is in the Compass.  I could understand a newbie not knowing, but someone who claims to be a travel blogger?  

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2 hours ago, Flatbush Flyer said:

You may want to rethink “net daily rate,” which is far more accurate than “bottom line” in comparing different cruise companies and their products. If you don’t fully understand this, do a test comparison of two similar cruises with one being one day longer than the other.

As for smoky casinos and crowds, “many” DO mind them and end up unhappily surprised if they didn’t do their comprehensive research beforehand. 

If they didn't do their research then I don't feel bad for them. In my subsequent post I did point out that the net daily rate does come in handy in comparing cruises of different lengths. But if each cruise being looked at is the same length all I'm concerned about is the total (after factoring in what one cruise lines includes in the fare, of course). 

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On 12/3/2023 at 8:46 AM, 9tee2Sea said:

Biggest misconception is that cruising is not gay friendly.  As a gay couple, we have been  on a variety of cruise ships over the last 30 years ( we cruise probably twice a year).  Never had any problems with anyone.  Almost every ship we  have been on has had some sort of LGBT meet up.  If they didn't, it was really easy to find "Fellow Travelers" and just meet up for drinks on our own.

 

Biggest misconception?  I've never heard this before. Glad to hear it isn't true.  

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7 hours ago, sparks1093 said:

Why focus on "net daily rate"? Just focus on the overall total. I don't really care what I'm paying each day, I'm more concerned with what is coming out of my pocket. By comparing all of the costs (i.e. the things that I know that I'm going to be purchasing) I have found that more upscale lines are indeed a possibility for us, so one day we might book one. (And many don't mind the things that you do so the smoky casinos and crowds aren't something to avoid.)

 

 

I look at the all-in daily cost as a good comparison between cruises.   Over the years, we have kind of developed an informal rule for what would be considered attractive pricing based on the per day cost.   Unlike you, using an apples-to-apples comparison I have yet to find a premium/luxury fare that is even close for the cabin categories we use.  That never ending claim is a big misconception in my mind.  

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26 minutes ago, ldubs said:

 

I look at the all-in daily cost as a good comparison between cruises.   Over the years, we have kind of developed an informal rule for what would be considered attractive pricing based on the per day cost.   Unlike you, using an apples-to-apples comparison I have yet to find a premium/luxury fare that is even close for the cabin categories we use.  That never ending claim is a big misconception in my mind.  

To clarify, I said that I found a more upscale line, not a premium/luxury line. Think Princess or Celebrity, not Oceania or Seaborne. 

Edited by sparks1093
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18 minutes ago, sparks1093 said:

To clarify, I said that I found a more upscale line, not a premium/luxury line. Think Princess or Celebrity, not Oceania or Seaborne. 

 

Sorry, I need to pay more attention!  

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56 minutes ago, sparks1093 said:

To clarify, I said that I found a more upscale line, not a premium/luxury line. Think Princess or Celebrity, not Oceania or Seaborne. 

Others, however, have made comparisons in a similar manner to the more premium/luxury lines such as those you reference. I'm not sure those comparisons would be apples to apples, however, as they provide a different cruising experience.

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1 hour ago, leaveitallbehind said:

Others, however, have made comparisons in a similar manner to the more premium/luxury lines such as those you reference. I'm not sure those comparisons would be apples to apples, however, as they provide a different cruising experience.

Some does depend on what one values but one can certainly compare cruises leaving from a particular port on a given itinerary for a specified number of days or nights and then decide if the difference in price is worth it or not. 

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51 minutes ago, sparks1093 said:

Some does depend on what one values but one can certainly compare cruises leaving from a particular port on a given itinerary for a specified number of days or nights and then decide if the difference in price is worth it or not. 

Agree - that would provide a one for one comparison and value measure. 

 

I think I was saying that there have been others who have (at least to my interpretation) suggested that when you consider all things included with the premium line v all the extra money spent for specialty restaurants, beverages, excursions, an in some cases airfare, that the premium lines compare favorably to the mass market lines.  Perhaps they do in value, but I'm not sure they do in total cost. (Daily value or otherwise). 

 

But to be fair I have not put together a spreadsheet comparison, so this is just my presumptive opinion.

Edited by leaveitallbehind
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I have a work colleague that is envious of our Viking Ocean and River cruises.  She says that she always wanted to try Viking but they are SO MUCH MORE EXPENSIVE than the larger ships that she sails on.

 

I finally said... ok.  Please do this for me.  You see Viking advertised at $6000.00pp and your cruise is $4,500.00pp.

 

Go on your cruise, but when you come back, please have a list of everything else that you paid for while on the cruise.  WiFi, drinks, shore excursions, port fees, - anything else.  

 

When she got back we looked at everything that she spent, and essentially we came out even.  She just assumed that Viking was going to charge her for everything that she was used to paying for on the larger lines, because she never investigated far enough to understand that Viking was including everything that she was paying extra for.

 

There is a belief (and I disclaimer that this may not be accurate) that many of the larger lines only cover their base cost of running the ship with cabin sales, and the profit comes from the add on sales once you are on the ship.

 

We have been looking at larger ships and different lines from Viking but in the evaluation process, it is very hard to understand what you have to pay for once you get on the ship.  They don't really share that on their web sites.

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12 hours ago, leaveitallbehind said:

Agree - that would provide a one for one comparison and value measure. 

 

I think I was saying that there have been others who have (at least to my interpretation) suggested that when you consider all things included with the premium line v all the extra money spent for specialty restaurants, beverages, excursions, an in some cases airfare, that the premium lines compare favorably to the mass market lines.  Perhaps they do in value, but I'm not sure they do in total cost. (Daily value or otherwise). 

 

But to be fair I have not put together a spreadsheet comparison, so this is just my presumptive opinion.

I read it the same way that you do, but the main take away is that someone may be able to afford more of a cruise than they realize if they take the time to total it all up. A lot depends on one's starting point. If one is only sailing in interior cabins on one of the main stream lines they most likely won't be able to make the jump to Oceania, but they very well could "move up the food chain" and be able to sail on Princess or Celebrity. If, however, someone is sailing in suites on a mainstream line and paying a premium for a "ship within a ship" experience then they just might be able to make the change to Oceania once all of the things are totaled. It also depends on what one is paying for on their current line. If they aren't buying the drink package then getting an included package isn't going to do much for them. If they never eat in a specialty restaurant having those options available won't mean much for them (for example, we've eaten in specialty restaurants twice in twelve cruises). As @CDNPolar points out it can be difficult finding out what one has to pay for with a new cruise line and that too needs to be factored in, somehow. Of course if one is perfectly happy with their cruise line this is an exercise they don't need to participate in. But for those who want to try different lines it does open the door to possibilities that they might not have realized were there.

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Here's one I heard after a cruise:

"I never knew if there was anything to do. They never made any announcements.  The cruise was pretty boring."

Me: Read the daily paper and/or app that lists all the activities, meal opening times, going ashore times, etc.  Some of us even pack a highlighter, and mark things we don't want to miss.  

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53 minutes ago, shipgeeks said:

Here's one I heard after a cruise:

"I never knew if there was anything to do. They never made any announcements.  The cruise was pretty boring."

Me: Read the daily paper and/or app that lists all the activities, meal opening times, going ashore times, etc.  Some of us even pack a highlighter, and mark things we don't want to miss.  

On some cruise lines one of the biggest complaints is constant activities announcements!

 

They must have been asleep or just not paying attention to anything.  To add to your information sources is the stateroom TV, typically with a scrolling agenda of events on one channel and another dedicated to ship activities hosted by the cruise director and staff.

 

 

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On 12/2/2023 at 1:05 PM, shipgeeks said:

A novice cruiser mentioned to me that she felt obliged to order a drink in any lounge she went into.  She loves music and dancing, but hesitated to sit, or to barhop, without buying more drinks.  Not true!  No obligation at all.  Typically, if a server offers and you decline, he will place a little paper napkin on your table; this is a signal to other servers that you have been asked.

She also said she was told by another passenger that everyone must vacate the ship in every port, and that no food of any kind is available while in a port.  Also not true in the least (although some food venues, usually main dining room, will not be open for lunch).

Have you come across other misconceptions?

I think the person who said everyone must vacate the ship and no food on the ship while in port was being malicious. 
 

We have looked at Oceania but we don’t drink alcohol and wonder if it would be worth it to us.

Edited by KBS1607
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