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Celebrity Dress Code Discussion Thread


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We no longer take carry clothes for formal evenings.

 

We very much appreciate the Celebrity provides excellent alternative dining venues for those of us who wish to remain casual on formal evenings. So we steer clear of the MDR on formal nights.

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Hi Everyone,

In an effort to create an improved experience regarding Dress Codes, we are trying out a new feature, by creating a "Sticky" thread. This New thread is to be used for all discussions regarding Celebrity's Dress Code policy.

We have established this thread, as the "go to" thread for all discussions pertaining to Celebrity Cruise Line's Dress Code policies. This thread is intended to make it easier for all Cruise Critic members to discuss current policies and any future changes. This is in lieu of having multiple simultaneous threads containing various discussions. We will combine all new posts and threads to this thread. Please follow our lead and post your questions and comments about Celebrity's Dress Code policies on this thread.

If you have any questions, you are welcome to email us.

Thank you to all for participating in our community !

Sincerely,

Host Andy

Host Walt

Here is the current Celebrity policy (as of October 12, 2014):

------------------------

What to Pack

 

So what do you pack? You'll need three types of clothing-casual or day wear, clothes for sightseeing (this clothing also needs to take into account what excursions you have planned) and evening wear. When you're on the ship or in a port of call, stylish resort wear is fine for everyone. If you're traveling in a warmer climate, this includes walking shorts and polo shirts, swimsuits and cover-ups, lightweight slacks or skirts and a light sweater. For cooler climates, you'll want casual clothing that can be layered. Don't forget to pack a raincoat or umbrella, and perhaps a waterproof hat and gloves. On any Celebrity Cruise it's smart to bring comfortable, rubber-soled shoes, hat, sunglasses and sunscreen. And, remember to pack your prescription medications and other personal care items you'll need.

Evening Attire

Evenings aboard Celebrity include two types of dress: "Smart Casual and Above" and "Formal."

 

"Smart Casual and Above"

 

Ladies: Skirt or pants (no holes, rips or tears) with a sweater or blouse.

 

Gentlemen: Pants (no holes, rips or tears) with a sports shirt or sweater. Shirts must have sleeves.

 

"Formal" attire:

 

Ladies: Cocktail dress, gown, or a dressy pantsuit.

 

Gentlemen: Tuxedo, suit or dinner jacket with slacks.

 

Note: T-shirts, swimsuits, robes, bare feet, tank tops, baseball caps and pool wear are not allowed in the main restaurant or specialty restaurant at any time. Shorts and flip-flops are not allowed in the evening hours. The dress code will be enforced at all restaurants. And guests are asked to follow the "Smart Casual and Above" dress code in the Celebrity Theater for all evening performances.

 

The daily program, delivered to your stateroom and available at the Guest Relations Desk, will be your guide to the appropriate attire each evening. A casual dress code applies at all times onboard Celebrity Xpedition®.

-------------------------

 

Has there been a recent change in dress code from formal to chic?? If so, what would be chic?

Edited by rjuray
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The dress code is out of step with the times. Celebrity seems to want to attract a younger crowd. A more formal dress code won't "cut it" with the millenials.

 

On future cruises,we will go to the specialty restaurants to avoid dressing up. In our opinions,the food on formal night is no big deal. In fact,we ate at the buffet for dinner on 3 occasions on the Eclipse last winter and enjoyed it immensely and we will do it again.

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Celebrity may want to attract more Millennials but when I cruise - they are very much in the minority and the age and % of cruisers go up from there. I am the mother of 2 Millennials and 1 that missed it by 2 yrs and none of them would chose Celebrity over another line that REALLY caters to a younger crowd with the music and activities that come with that -- well unless I book and pay. :cool:

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The dress code is out of step with the times. Celebrity seems to want to attract a younger crowd. A more formal dress code won't "cut it" with the millenials.

 

On future cruises,we will go to the specialty restaurants to avoid dressing up. In our opinions,the food on formal night is no big deal. In fact,we ate at the buffet for dinner on 3 occasions on the Eclipse last winter and enjoyed it immensely and we will do it again.

 

No sensible cruise line is the slightest interested in pleasing Millenials. That demographic is not where cruisers come from. They are competing for the successful people now on their late 30's and up. Rap music, twerking and elimination of culture isn't in the cards yet! The premium cruise lines know they would lose most of their loyal cruisers and revenue if pleasing Millenials were a factor.

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We are both in our early sixties. We travel frequently-five months out of the past twelve. Celebrity is at the top of the list of cruise lines that we prefer.

 

After a career of suits for work the very last thing that DW or I want to do is dress up for a formal night in the MDR. Besides, these MDR formal evenings are certainly not what they were 5, 10, or 15 years ago. Cannot say that the menus are anything to write home about either on those nights. So we simply dine elsewhere on those nights.

 

I suspect that there are more people like us. More vacation time, a travel budget predisposed to augmenting land travel with cruises.

 

Like it or not there is always a generational change coming. We are fine with it...in fact we look forward to it. Who wants to stay in the same old rut? Change is good and we embrace it.

 

I suspect that Celebrity, and a few other cruise lines want to position themselves to where 'the puck is going' not where 'the puck has been'. It is how they remain competitive and profitable.

Edited by iancal
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We are both in our early sixties. We travel frequently-five months out of the past twelve. Celebrity is at the top of the list of cruise lines that we prefer.

 

After a career of suits for work the very last thing that DW or I want to do is dress up for a formal night in the MDR. Besides, these MDR formal evenings are certainly not what they were 5, 10, or 15 years ago. Cannot say that the menus are anything to write home about either on those nights. So we simply dine elsewhere on those nights.

 

I suspect that there are more people like us. More vacation time, a travel budget predisposed to augmenting land travel with cruises.

 

Like it or not there is always a generational change coming. We are fine with it...in fact we look forward to it. Who wants to stay in the same old rut? Change is good and we embrace it.

 

I suspect that Celebrity, and a few other cruise lines want to position themselves to where 'the puck is going' not where 'the puck has been'. It is how they remain competitive and profitable.

 

Couldn't agree more. We travel 5-6 months a year and frequently incorporate a cruise with other travels. The idea that we would drag formal wear 10000 miles (and then have it sit in suitcases for weeks at a time) to "enjoy" a couple of formal nights isn't in the cards. And if Celebrity has visions of positioning upscale then the code will need to be modified. Many of the true premium and luxury lines learned that long ago.

 

 

Sent from my KFTHWI using Forums mobile app

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It's not younger cruisers that oppose dressing for formal nights but the recently retired. Which is probably why they keep quoting Dylan ('The times they are a changin'). Really? :rolleyes: We get dressed up to go out at night (dinner, theater, club) so we'd do that on a ship as well. :cool: Realistically, most people no longer "live" in jeans.

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It's not younger cruisers that oppose dressing for formal nights but the recently retired. Which is probably why they keep quoting Dylan ('The times they are a changin'). Really? :rolleyes:

Haha! Glad I'm not the only one who's noticed that! ;) "Hey, relax the dress code because we don't want to get dressed up - Oops, I mean because THEY don't want to get dressed up - those young professionals that you should be trying to attract!"

We get dressed up to go out at night (dinner, theater, club) so we'd do that on a ship as well. :cool: Realistically, most people no longer "live" in jeans.

That's us too - and that's not going to change in a few years when we retire. Having said that, I have no problem with those who don't desire to dress and simply pick a different venue on formal nights. It's the "I'm not getting dressed up but I WILL eat in the MDR on formal night" crowd that I can't stand - but that crowd mainly exists on CC, not so much when on board the ship.

 

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-N910A using Tapatalk

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Where we live many people live in jeans.

 

I certainly do now that we are retired...except when we travel to warmer climes and shorts become the order of the day.

 

Not everyone lives in New York.

Edited by iancal
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Where we live many people live in jeans.

 

I certainly do now that we are retired...except when we travel to warmer climes and shorts become the order of the day.

 

Not everyone lives in New York.

So where do you live that everyone lives in jeans? We don't live in New York, but we don't dress like Hillbillies, either. When we dine out at a higher end rest. We either wear a suit & tie or at least a sport jacket & nice shirt. when dining at a high end rest. you're expected to dress the part. Those who don't, should stick to Applebee's type places.

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Alberta, Canada.

 

I did not say everyone, I said many.

Yeah, you folks are a pretty casual bunch. We met about 30 from there a few years ago(the Eclipse) & dressing up didn't seem their style. Usually saw them in the buffet.

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Just because it is not unusual where we live for people to wear jeans to high end restaurants does not meet that we are a bunch of hillbillies.

 

There are jeans and there are jeans. If your perception of jeans is dirty, ripped, ill fitting dungarees then I would suggest that the perception is a little jaded....not to mention a tad out of date.

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Just because it is not unusual where we live for people to wear jeans to high end restaurants does not meet that we are a bunch of hillbillies.

 

There are jeans and there are jeans. If your perception of jeans is dirty, ripped, ill fitting dungarees then I would suggest that the perception is a little jaded....not to mention a tad out of date.

I'm in LA Cal (Lala land to some) where blue jeans (nice ones, not ripped or holely jeans) are everywhere from Denny's to the fanciest of fancy restaurants. About the only time folks wear business suits are lawyers in court, usually with no tie and shirts not tucked in, and job interviews. We dined at Lawry's Prime Rib two weeks ago in Beverly Hills and the majority were casual, even a few "B list" people that we recognized. The maitre d' was the only fully "suit and tie" person in the place.

 

Based on my personal observation only, that seems to be the basic standard in all of California.

 

New York City, Washington DC and Chicago are the exceptions where matching suits and ties are de rigeur.

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Just because it is not unusual where we live for people to wear jeans to high end restaurants does not meet that we are a bunch of hillbillies.

 

There are jeans and there are jeans. If your perception of jeans is dirty, ripped, ill fitting dungarees then I would suggest that the perception is a little jaded....not to mention a tad out of date.

You make it appear that everyone dresses up in NYC. I've been there enough to say it's far from that. You'll see the fancier dressed along Madison Ave. where the heavy duty shopping is. Other than that, a lot of people were dressed surprisingly slovenly.

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We are both in our early sixties. We travel frequently-five months out of the past twelve. Celebrity is at the top of the list of cruise lines that we prefer.

 

After a career of suits for work the very last thing that DW or I want to do is dress up for a formal night in the MDR. Besides, these MDR formal evenings are certainly not what they were 5, 10, or 15 years ago. Cannot say that the menus are anything to write home about either on those nights. So we simply dine elsewhere on those nights.

 

I suspect that there are more people like us. More vacation time, a travel budget predisposed to augmenting land travel with cruises.

 

Like it or not there is always a generational change coming. We are fine with it...in fact we look forward to it. Who wants to stay in the same old rut? Change is good and we embrace it.

 

I suspect that Celebrity, and a few other cruise lines want to position themselves to where 'the puck is going' not where 'the puck has been'. It is how they remain competitive and profitable.

 

Excellent post.

 

We are both professionals in the financial industry. My desire to wear formal attire while on vacation is less than zero. But...we still dress for dinner. We always look nice. Some people on this thread have a tendency to think that if you're not dressing formal you're slovenly and that all jeans belong in the garden which is ridiculous. On a Celebrity presidents cruise a couple of years ago most pics of the president were him in jeans. And he looked good!

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I think men who wear suits and ties to work tend to prefer a sports jacket or sweater on the weekend. Even friends of ours who were known to dress more formally, are now casual

 

In our city (which some find sophisticated!) I find that the more upscale restaurants are frequented by the young. And they are casual chic. When we do go to one of these restaurants, we notice that there are very few seniors!

 

However, when we go to a neighbourhood restaurant, it is filled with seniors!

 

Some of the posters here love to dress up. They seem to be campaigning for the status quo dresscode. But the truth is that more and more pax are preferring smart casual. That is not to say sloppy. It can be very attractive.

 

I don't recall ever seeing anyone in shorts in the MDR at dinnertime. As a matter of fact, the few times we have had dinner upstairs, I was frankly surprised to see some in shorts because I find it too cold in the evening and I always take a cover-up.

Edited by Can'tstopcruising
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I'm in LA Cal (Lala land to some) where blue jeans (nice ones, not ripped or holely jeans) are everywhere from Denny's to the fanciest of fancy restaurants. About the only time folks wear business suits are lawyers in court, usually with no tie and shirts not tucked in, and job interviews. We dined at Lawry's Prime Rib two weeks ago in Beverly Hills and the majority were casual, even a few "B list" people that we recognized. The maitre d' was the only fully "suit and tie" person in the place.

 

Based on my personal observation only, that seems to be the basic standard in all of California.

 

New York City, Washington DC and Chicago are the exceptions where matching suits and ties are de rigeur.

 

It's much the same here in Australia. Suits and ties are in the minority even in the best of restaurants. Smart casual is pretty standard everywhere although weird, arbitrary dress codes occasionally pop up even in downmarket establishments. My nephew was complaining on Facebook recently about being denied entry into an RSL club (about as downmarket as you can get) because he was wearing ripped "designer" jeans, but people in shorts, sandals and t-shirts were allowed in.

 

Who can ever understand these bizarre dress code things?

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I'm in LA Cal (Lala land to some) where blue jeans (nice ones, not ripped or holely jeans) are everywhere from Denny's to the fanciest of fancy restaurants. About the only time folks wear business suits are lawyers in court, usually with no tie and shirts not tucked in, and job interviews. We dined at Lawry's Prime Rib two weeks ago in Beverly Hills and the majority were casual, even a few "B list" people that we recognized. The maitre d' was the only fully "suit and tie" person in the place.

 

Based on my personal observation only, that seems to be the basic standard in all of California.

 

New York City, Washington DC and Chicago are the exceptions where matching suits and ties are de rigeur.

 

Walt is right and it's not only California, how many have we seen on cruises with kilts, Texans have come on line on this board and said boots, dungarees, and Cowbow hats are formal. The only group giving us a standard is Celebrity cruise line, they have already changed with the times, just follow their standards.

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I think men who wear suits and ties to work tend to prefer a sports jacket or sweater on the weekend. Even friends of ours who were known to dress more formally' date=' are now casual

 

In our city (which some find sophisticated!) I find that the more upscale restaurants are frequented by the young. And they are casual chic. When we do go to one of these restaurants, we notice that there are very few seniors!

 

However, when we go to a neighbourhood restaurant, it is filled with seniors!

 

Some of the posters here love to dress up. They seem to be campaigning for the status quo dresscode. But the truth is that more and more pax are preferring smart casual. That is not to say sloppy. It can be very attractive.

 

I don't recall ever seeing anyone in shorts in the MDR at dinnertime. As a matter of fact, the few times we have had dinner upstairs, I was frankly surprised to see some in shorts because I find it too cold in the evening and I always take a cover-up.[/quote']

 

I have seen shorts but only on the first night and on other nights on those who I know did not get their luggage.

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I am currently on the Silhouette and I am convinced from several comments that the Miami office will soon announce a change to formal night dress code to Formal (or Jackets) optional in the MDR on formal nights as it is in the speciality dining locations.

I did not want to start another thread on this subject, but just thought I would post it. They have not announced it, but the sense is that it will be announced soon.

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I am currently on the Silhouette and I am convinced from several comments that the Miami office will soon announce a change to formal night dress code to Formal (or Jackets) optional in the MDR on formal nights as it is in the speciality dining locations.

....

 

Isn't that the Dress Code in the MDR at all other times anyway? As far as I'm aware if you want to wear your tux at breakfast you can do.

 

If it is to change isn't "suggested" a more likely next step rather than "optional"?

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